Date   

Re: Unknown sp.

Cliff Weisse
 

There may have been Horned Larks there today but the birds in your photos from yesterday are not Horned Larks. Thick based bills, pot bellied look, and pale bar on wing coverts are on consistent with Horned Lark. I think Zeke has it right, they are Rosy Finches but I'm not going to attempt to identify them to species.

Cliff


On 1/9/21 11:20 AM, M Gregory wrote:
I figured it out by going back out there this morning. The birds are Horned Larks and they are feeding on farmland that has been tilled straight across the road from where I photographed them yesterday. The backlighting was strong yesterday and again today, making photography difficult.
Alan Gregory

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 6:47 PM M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association


--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association
-- 
Cliff and Lisa Weisse
Island Park, Idaho
cliffandlisa@...


Re: Unknown sp.

M Gregory
 

I figured it out by going back out there this morning. The birds are Horned Larks and they are feeding on farmland that has been tilled straight across the road from where I photographed them yesterday. The backlighting was strong yesterday and again today, making photography difficult.
Alan Gregory


On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 6:47 PM M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association



Re: Unknown sp.

Ken Miracle
 

There has been a mixed flock that winters in the Hammer Flats area and roosts in the black cliffs near Lucky Peak State Park Discovery Unit.

My brother-in-law lives on the lower end of East Fork I have heard about the flocks up at Triumph but have not encountered them.

Thanks for the info.

That flock of Rosy-finches that swirled around me when I was out chukar hunting with some friends was exciting. My friends had a pretty good day with their shotguns on chukars but I bagged more birds with my camera :-)

On Jan 9, 2021, at 6:39 AM, scottywarbler via groups.io <scottywarbler@...> wrote:

Looks like there are a few Grey-crowned mixed in. I see a few in the upper picture. Rosy’s are winter residents at a few locations here in The Wood River valley, specifically up at the old mining town of Triumph northeast of Hailey; and up in Elkhorn village area. I’ve spent a lot of time up there in the winter watching them. Often times we only see them flying around  in flocks and have to try and distinguish the two species against bright winter overcast skies. Grey-crowned’s are lighter on the belly than Black’s. You can see some rose coloration on the flanks of a few of the birds at extreme magnification in the photos. The wing bars also show some of that coloration as well. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 11:35 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

Zeke …. You could very well be correct … fat head and stubby bill and some appear to have a lighter crown and lighter under the wing than I would expect with a Blackbird flock. On the Rosy-finches I shot in flight in 2019 in better light I see the wing bars that could be mistaken for red-winged epaulets in the darker images.

The lighting and exposure on Alan’s images could be making them look darker/blacker than they are.

Louisa and most others on IBLE are far more experienced birders than I am and I am not a Gray-crowned and Black Rosy-finch expert at all.

What makes you think Black Rosy-finch and not Gray-crowned or a mixed flock? It is hard for me to see all the ID marks I read about for them from the dark photos. The only Black Rosy-finches that I had photographed before the ones below were sitting not flying and I had to get some of the IBO biologists to help me sort out the Black from the Gray-crowned. And of course there are plummage variations in adults and with immature birds … just to drive me nuts :-)

Here is a large, what I Id’d as a mixed flock, with more Gray-crowned than Black. I photographed these in better light on 11-7-2019 near Succor Creek in Oregon and near the Idaho Border.

<_KMM2701.jpg>

<_KMM2720.jpg>


On Jan 8, 2021, at 10:26 PM, scottywarbler via groups.io <scottywarbler@...> wrote:

These are Rosy-finches not blackbirds. Looks like Black Rosy-finch. Note that those are not epaulets but wingbars. Also “fat-headed and stubby billed. Rosy’s move down out of the high country above timberline in large flocks like this in the winter. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:36 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

I just opened the images up on my 27 inch iMac and expanded zoomed in even closer. It appears to me that I can see the epaulets or Red-winged Blackbirds.

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Re: Unknown sp.

scottywarbler
 

Looks like there are a few Grey-crowned mixed in. I see a few in the upper picture. Rosy’s are winter residents at a few locations here in The Wood River valley, specifically up at the old mining town of Triumph northeast of Hailey; and up in Elkhorn village area. I’ve spent a lot of time up there in the winter watching them. Often times we only see them flying around  in flocks and have to try and distinguish the two species against bright winter overcast skies. Grey-crowned’s are lighter on the belly than Black’s. You can see some rose coloration on the flanks of a few of the birds at extreme magnification in the photos. The wing bars also show some of that coloration as well. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 11:35 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

Zeke …. You could very well be correct … fat head and stubby bill and some appear to have a lighter crown and lighter under the wing than I would expect with a Blackbird flock. On the Rosy-finches I shot in flight in 2019 in better light I see the wing bars that could be mistaken for red-winged epaulets in the darker images.

The lighting and exposure on Alan’s images could be making them look darker/blacker than they are.

Louisa and most others on IBLE are far more experienced birders than I am and I am not a Gray-crowned and Black Rosy-finch expert at all.

What makes you think Black Rosy-finch and not Gray-crowned or a mixed flock? It is hard for me to see all the ID marks I read about for them from the dark photos. The only Black Rosy-finches that I had photographed before the ones below were sitting not flying and I had to get some of the IBO biologists to help me sort out the Black from the Gray-crowned. And of course there are plummage variations in adults and with immature birds … just to drive me nuts :-)

Here is a large, what I Id’d as a mixed flock, with more Gray-crowned than Black. I photographed these in better light on 11-7-2019 near Succor Creek in Oregon and near the Idaho Border.

<_KMM2701.jpg>

<_KMM2720.jpg>


On Jan 8, 2021, at 10:26 PM, scottywarbler via groups.io <scottywarbler@...> wrote:

These are Rosy-finches not blackbirds. Looks like Black Rosy-finch. Note that those are not epaulets but wingbars. Also “fat-headed and stubby billed. Rosy’s move down out of the high country above timberline in large flocks like this in the winter. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:36 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

I just opened the images up on my 27 inch iMac and expanded zoomed in even closer. It appears to me that I can see the epaulets or Red-winged Blackbirds.

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Re: Unknown sp.

Ken Miracle
 

Zeke …. You could very well be correct … fat head and stubby bill and some appear to have a lighter crown and lighter under the wing than I would expect with a Blackbird flock. On the Rosy-finches I shot in flight in 2019 in better light I see the wing bars that could be mistaken for red-winged epaulets in the darker images.

The lighting and exposure on Alan’s images could be making them look darker/blacker than they are.

Louisa and most others on IBLE are far more experienced birders than I am and I am not a Gray-crowned and Black Rosy-finch expert at all.

What makes you think Black Rosy-finch and not Gray-crowned or a mixed flock? It is hard for me to see all the ID marks I read about for them from the dark photos. The only Black Rosy-finches that I had photographed before the ones below were sitting not flying and I had to get some of the IBO biologists to help me sort out the Black from the Gray-crowned. And of course there are plummage variations in adults and with immature birds … just to drive me nuts :-)

Here is a large, what I Id’d as a mixed flock, with more Gray-crowned than Black. I photographed these in better light on 11-7-2019 near Succor Creek in Oregon and near the Idaho Border.




On Jan 8, 2021, at 10:26 PM, scottywarbler via groups.io <scottywarbler@...> wrote:

These are Rosy-finches not blackbirds. Looks like Black Rosy-finch. Note that those are not epaulets but wingbars. Also “fat-headed and stubby billed. Rosy’s move down out of the high country above timberline in large flocks like this in the winter. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:36 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

I just opened the images up on my 27 inch iMac and expanded zoomed in even closer. It appears to me that I can see the epaulets or Red-winged Blackbirds.

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Re: Unknown sp.

scottywarbler
 

These are Rosy-finches not blackbirds. Looks like Black Rosy-finch. Note that those are not epaulets but wingbars. Also “fat-headed and stubby billed. Rosy’s move down out of the high country above timberline in large flocks like this in the winter. 

Zeke Watkins
208-731-1471
Instagram : @idahobirder

Not all those who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkien 

Without the animals, Man would die of a great loneliness of the Spirit - Chief Seattle

An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is a source of not only great curiosity but great fulfillment - Sir David Attenborough 

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:36 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

I just opened the images up on my 27 inch iMac and expanded zoomed in even closer. It appears to me that I can see the epaulets or Red-winged Blackbirds.

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Re: Unknown sp.

Ken Miracle
 

I just opened the images up on my 27 inch iMac and expanded zoomed in even closer. It appears to me that I can see the epaulets or Red-winged Blackbirds.

On Jan 8, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Re: Unknown sp.

Louisa Evers
 

Looks like at least some of them are red-winged blackbirds.  Could be a mixed flock of several species of blackbirds.  In the second photo, I think I’m seeing the red epaulets on some of the birds. 

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 18:48 M Gregory <alanclarkg@...> wrote:
Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association


--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...


Unknown sp.

M Gregory
 

Anyone have an idea of what species these birds are? I photographed the flock over sage flats a mile or so from Old Highway 30 in Elmore County this afternoon. When I think of songbirds flocking in winter, I think of House Sparrows. No human activity in this area. Just sagebrush
Alan in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association



Covid - birding

Christoph Randler
 

Happy New Year
Dear Birders,

Hope you all are fine; we are doing a short study how COVID-19 has changed birding. Please help us and answer a few questions, that take some minutes. You can also forward the link to others.
 
https://www.soscisurvey.de/birdwatchers/
 
The study is in several languages and we would be happy for your participation. The study is hosted by the University of Tübingen, and run by a team of people, also being birders.
Stay healthy and good birding,
Christoph

Christoph Randler eBirdprofile: https://ebird.org/profile/NTM0NTM1/world


Re: Great gray owl is still at Montour

Leanne Lloyd-Fairey
 

Well, I thought I attached the image. I'll try again with it pasted in.


Re: Great gray owl is still at Montour

Leanne Lloyd-Fairey
 

I have found the Crossley ID Guide for Raptors to be a great resource. The format is too big to be considered a field guide, but I like to compare photos taken in the field with the photos in the book. 

I've attached a poorly scanned image from the spread on Bald Eagles in flight -- adult, subadult, and immature.

Leanne Lloyd-Fairey
Emmett, ID


Re: Great gray owl is still at Montour

Tom & Susan Soniville
 

Thanks to all of you for the education. I had no idea there was such a thing as wing pits. I wondered about the smaller raptor being a red tail, but it seemed too white underneath. I may just go back to small, medium and large for classifying raptors.

Tom Soniville


-------- Original message --------
From: "Ken Miracle via groups.io" <chukar28@...>
Date: 1/6/21 6:36 PM (GMT-07:00)
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour

Good pointer on ID of the Bald Eagle.

I never even looked at the hawk … your correct … dark pataglia and there is actually a belly band all that point to a Red-tailed Hawk.

On Jan 6, 2021, at 5:33 PM, Dave & Brenda Pace <dbpace@q.com> wrote:

Tom,
 
Some very knowledgeable raptor ID people shared with me many years ago that if there is any white in the birds wing pits it is an immature Bald Eagle.  Immature goldens can have white out on their wings but never in their wing pits.  In your second photo with the smaller raptor coming in inline and behind the eagle you can see the white wing pits very well.  
 
On a side note the other bird looks more like a Red-Tail to me than a harrier with the dark leading edges on his wings and the belly band.
 
Seems like the white wing pits cue isn’t well known so I thought I would share what I had learned.
 
Dave Pace
Idaho Falls, ID
 
From: Tom & Susan Soniville
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2021 10:04 AM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour
 
Thanks to some kind guidance from an IBLEer, we were able to see the Great Gray yesterday. It was a great treat. If you are out that way, don’t miss all the other raptors in the area. We saw a Kestrel, a Sharp-Shinned hawk, multiple Red Tails, at least one Harrier, and what I believe is an immature Golden Eagle. A Harrier and the eagle were involved in some aerial jousting. I would appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Golden or a Bald. We also saw an adult Bald between Sweet and Ola. 
 
Combine that with great weather and some kind people and was a wonderful day.
 
Tom Soniville
West Bench Boise
 
From: IBLE@groups.io <IBLE@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Miracle via groups.io
Sent: Monday, January 04, 2021 8:01 AM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour
 
:-) a number of us were there Saturday afternoon and did not find it … how dare those birds have wings and move around and hide from us.
 
 


On Jan 4, 2021, at 7:41 AM, John Shortis via groups.io <john_shortis@...> wrote:
 
...and was still there yesterday (Sunday) PM.
 
John Shortis
 
On Friday, January 1, 2021, 06:48:29 PM MST, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote: 
 
 
At least one great gray remains in the vicinity of the Montour Road-Main Street intersection<LE4_2309.jpg>


-- 
Louisa Evers
<LE4_2309.jpg>
 
Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5
 


-- 
Tom Soniville
Boise. North End 

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


--
Tom Soniville
Boise. North End


Re: Great gray owl is still at Montour

Ken Miracle
 

Good pointer on ID of the Bald Eagle.

I never even looked at the hawk … your correct … dark pataglia and there is actually a belly band all that point to a Red-tailed Hawk.

On Jan 6, 2021, at 5:33 PM, Dave & Brenda Pace <dbpace@q.com> wrote:

Tom,
 
Some very knowledgeable raptor ID people shared with me many years ago that if there is any white in the birds wing pits it is an immature Bald Eagle.  Immature goldens can have white out on their wings but never in their wing pits.  In your second photo with the smaller raptor coming in inline and behind the eagle you can see the white wing pits very well.  
 
On a side note the other bird looks more like a Red-Tail to me than a harrier with the dark leading edges on his wings and the belly band.
 
Seems like the white wing pits cue isn’t well known so I thought I would share what I had learned.
 
Dave Pace
Idaho Falls, ID
 
From: Tom & Susan Soniville
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2021 10:04 AM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour
 
Thanks to some kind guidance from an IBLEer, we were able to see the Great Gray yesterday. It was a great treat. If you are out that way, don’t miss all the other raptors in the area. We saw a Kestrel, a Sharp-Shinned hawk, multiple Red Tails, at least one Harrier, and what I believe is an immature Golden Eagle. A Harrier and the eagle were involved in some aerial jousting. I would appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Golden or a Bald. We also saw an adult Bald between Sweet and Ola. 
 
Combine that with great weather and some kind people and was a wonderful day.
 
Tom Soniville
West Bench Boise
 
From: IBLE@groups.io <IBLE@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Miracle via groups.io
Sent: Monday, January 04, 2021 8:01 AM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour
 
:-) a number of us were there Saturday afternoon and did not find it … how dare those birds have wings and move around and hide from us.
 
 


On Jan 4, 2021, at 7:41 AM, John Shortis via groups.io <john_shortis@...> wrote:
 
...and was still there yesterday (Sunday) PM.
 
John Shortis
 
On Friday, January 1, 2021, 06:48:29 PM MST, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote: 
 
 
At least one great gray remains in the vicinity of the Montour Road-Main Street intersection<LE4_2309.jpg>


-- 
Louisa Evers
<LE4_2309.jpg>
 
Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5
 


-- 
Tom Soniville
Boise. North End 

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Re: Great gray owl is still at Montour

Dave & Brenda Pace
 

Tom,
 
Some very knowledgeable raptor ID people shared with me many years ago that if there is any white in the birds wing pits it is an immature Bald Eagle.  Immature goldens can have white out on their wings but never in their wing pits.  In your second photo with the smaller raptor coming in inline and behind the eagle you can see the white wing pits very well. 
 
On a side note the other bird looks more like a Red-Tail to me than a harrier with the dark leading edges on his wings and the belly band.
 
Seems like the white wing pits cue isn’t well known so I thought I would share what I had learned.
 
Dave Pace
Idaho Falls, ID
 

From: Tom & Susan Soniville
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2021 10:04 AM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour
 

Thanks to some kind guidance from an IBLEer, we were able to see the Great Gray yesterday. It was a great treat. If you are out that way, don’t miss all the other raptors in the area. We saw a Kestrel, a Sharp-Shinned hawk, multiple Red Tails, at least one Harrier, and what I believe is an immature Golden Eagle. A Harrier and the eagle were involved in some aerial jousting. I would appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Golden or a Bald. We also saw an adult Bald between Sweet and Ola.

 

Combine that with great weather and some kind people and was a wonderful day.

 

Tom Soniville

West Bench Boise

 

From: IBLE@groups.io <IBLE@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Miracle via groups.io
Sent: Monday, January 04, 2021 8:01 AM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour

 

:-) a number of us were there Saturday afternoon and did not find it … how dare those birds have wings and move around and hide from us.

 

 



On Jan 4, 2021, at 7:41 AM, John Shortis via groups.io <john_shortis@...> wrote:

 

...and was still there yesterday (Sunday) PM.

 

John Shortis

 

On Friday, January 1, 2021, 06:48:29 PM MST, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

 

 

At least one great gray remains in the vicinity of the Montour Road-Main Street intersection<LE4_2309.jpg>


--

Louisa Evers

elouisa603@...

<LE4_2309.jpg>

 

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5

 


--
Tom Soniville
Boise. North End


Kestrel

M Gregory
 


I watched an American Kestrel catch prey yesterday along Old Highway 30, Elmore County. Here are pics of the raptor eating atop a utility pole and another shot of the gird after its meal.
Alan Gregory

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association



Re: Great gray owl is still at Montour

Tom & Susan Soniville
 

Ken,

 

Thanks for the pictures, I had not known about the wing patches from other pictures I looked at.

 

Tom

 

From: IBLE@groups.io <IBLE@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Miracle via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2021 10:26 AM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour

 

With that much white on the wings and tail at this time of year I would think it is an immature Bald Eagle. There is a good side by side in the air here.

 

 

On Jan 6, 2021, at 10:04 AM, Tom & Susan Soniville <tomnsueid@...> wrote:

 

Thanks to some kind guidance from an IBLEer, we were able to see the Great Gray yesterday. It was a great treat. If you are out that way, don’t miss all the other raptors in the area. We saw a Kestrel, a Sharp-Shinned hawk, multiple Red Tails, at least one Harrier, and what I believe is an immature Golden Eagle. A Harrier and the eagle were involved in some aerial jousting. I would appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Golden or a Bald. We also saw an adult Bald between Sweet and Ola. 

 

Combine that with great weather and some kind people and was a wonderful day.

 

Tom Soniville

West Bench Boise

 

From: IBLE@groups.io <IBLE@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Miracle via groups.io
Sent: Monday, January 04, 2021 8:01 AM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour

 

:-) a number of us were there Saturday afternoon and did not find it … how dare those birds have wings and move around and hide from us.

 

 




On Jan 4, 2021, at 7:41 AM, John Shortis via groups.io <john_shortis@...> wrote:

 

...and was still there yesterday (Sunday) PM.

 

John Shortis

 

On Friday, January 1, 2021, 06:48:29 PM MST, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

 

 

At least one great gray remains in the vicinity of the Montour Road-Main Street intersection<LE4_2309.jpg>


-- 

Louisa Evers

<LE4_2309.jpg>

 

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5

 


-- 
Tom Soniville
Boise. North End
<DSC_1256.jpg><DSC_1237.jpg>

 

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5

 


--
Tom Soniville
Boise. North End


Re: Great gray owl is still at Montour

Ken Miracle
 

With that much white on the wings and tail at this time of year I would think it is an immature Bald Eagle. There is a good side by side in the air here.


On Jan 6, 2021, at 10:04 AM, Tom & Susan Soniville <tomnsueid@...> wrote:

Thanks to some kind guidance from an IBLEer, we were able to see the Great Gray yesterday. It was a great treat. If you are out that way, don’t miss all the other raptors in the area. We saw a Kestrel, a Sharp-Shinned hawk, multiple Red Tails, at least one Harrier, and what I believe is an immature Golden Eagle. A Harrier and the eagle were involved in some aerial jousting. I would appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Golden or a Bald. We also saw an adult Bald between Sweet and Ola. 
 
Combine that with great weather and some kind people and was a wonderful day.
 
Tom Soniville
West Bench Boise
 
From: IBLE@groups.io <IBLE@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Miracle via groups.io
Sent: Monday, January 04, 2021 8:01 AM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour
 
:-) a number of us were there Saturday afternoon and did not find it … how dare those birds have wings and move around and hide from us.
 
 


On Jan 4, 2021, at 7:41 AM, John Shortis via groups.io <john_shortis@...> wrote:
 
...and was still there yesterday (Sunday) PM.
 
John Shortis
 
On Friday, January 1, 2021, 06:48:29 PM MST, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:
 
 
At least one great gray remains in the vicinity of the Montour Road-Main Street intersection<LE4_2309.jpg>


-- 
Louisa Evers
<LE4_2309.jpg>
 
Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5
 


-- 
Tom Soniville
Boise. North End<DSC_1256.jpg><DSC_1237.jpg>

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Re: Great gray owl is still at Montour

Tom & Susan Soniville
 

Thanks to some kind guidance from an IBLEer, we were able to see the Great Gray yesterday. It was a great treat. If you are out that way, don’t miss all the other raptors in the area. We saw a Kestrel, a Sharp-Shinned hawk, multiple Red Tails, at least one Harrier, and what I believe is an immature Golden Eagle. A Harrier and the eagle were involved in some aerial jousting. I would appreciate any feedback on whether this is a Golden or a Bald. We also saw an adult Bald between Sweet and Ola.

 

Combine that with great weather and some kind people and was a wonderful day.

 

Tom Soniville

West Bench Boise

 

From: IBLE@groups.io <IBLE@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Miracle via groups.io
Sent: Monday, January 04, 2021 8:01 AM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Great gray owl is still at Montour

 

:-) a number of us were there Saturday afternoon and did not find it … how dare those birds have wings and move around and hide from us.

 

 



On Jan 4, 2021, at 7:41 AM, John Shortis via groups.io <john_shortis@...> wrote:

 

...and was still there yesterday (Sunday) PM.

 

John Shortis

 

On Friday, January 1, 2021, 06:48:29 PM MST, Louisa Evers <elouisa603@...> wrote:

 

 

At least one great gray remains in the vicinity of the Montour Road-Main Street intersection<LE4_2309.jpg>


--

Louisa Evers

elouisa603@...

<LE4_2309.jpg>

 

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5

 


--
Tom Soniville
Boise. North End


Re: Northern Mockingbird, Eagle Island State Park, Ada Co.

Marty Marzinelli
 

I found the NOMO today that was previously seen by others.  It was late afternoon ~4:45pm, and it was located in the Russian Olive trees west of the old slaughter house.

Cheers,
Marty Marzinelli

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