Date   

Re: eBird report of Mississippi Kite from last night in Eagle (Ada Co)

Jon Barnett
 

Hi Jay!  I looked at that earlier when it popped up – with only a brief sighting and no binocs, it sure sounded like a Cooper’s Hawk to me… for whatever it’s worth…

 

Since I’m sending an email anyway, might as well share a recent photo from my Bird Gallery FB site; I took an unexpected last-minute trip to Colombia, and this Green-and-Black Fruiteater surprised me on a trail.

What a beautiful bird when seen up close! 

 

Everyone have a marvelous June…best, Jonathan

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Jay Carlisle via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 12:56 PM
To: IBLE
Subject: [IBLE] eBird report of Mississippi Kite from last night in Eagle (Ada Co)

 

For those not receiving eBird rarity alerts, here's an intriguing report ... and he's right that late spring is the right time for "spring overshoot" vagrancy in this species.  In my experience, out of range kites in spring tend to be here 1 minute, and gone the next (or pretty soon anyway :-) but if anyone's in the area, could be worth a look.

 

Jay

 

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: ebird-alert@... <ebird-alert@...>

To: "carlislejay@..." <carlislejay@...>

Sent: Tuesday, June 1, 2021, 1:15:39 AM MDT

Subject: [eBird Alert] Idaho Rare Bird Alert <hourly>

 

*** Species Summary:

 

Mississippi Kite (1 Ada)

 

---------------------------------------------

Thank you for subscribing to the <hourly> Idaho Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Idaho.  View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35737

NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

 

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

 

Mississippi Kite (Ictinia mississippiensis) (1)

- Reported May 31, 2021 19:30 by Kurt Radamaker

- Reid Merrill Park, Ada, Idaho

- Comments: "Sub adult.

 

My wife and I are avid birders visiting family in star Idaho from Scottsdale AZ for Memorial weekend. While eating dinner at coynes restaurant near reid merrill park, we had an unmistakable view of a miki. Size of white tailed kite, long tapered wings with dark primaries, dark underwing, chest, breast and belly marked with horizontal reddish streaks, longish dark tail. Not overall black and white as in white-tailed kite. The sighting was brief and without binoculars, but the bird was fairly close 25ft? It flew low over the tree tops.

 

With a lack of photos and the poor circumstances of this sighting, I certainly don't expect this sighting to go anywhere. The purpose of even putting this sighting in ebird is to alert Idaho birders of the possibility. I hope someone can go and check for it.

 

I have seen many miki and late may is an excellent time of year for one in Idaho!

 

I suspect if the bird is still around, it would be around the river and greenbelt.

 

Ps we spent a day at dangerfield jack looking for Cassia Crossbill without success &#x1f612;"

 

***********

 

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Idaho Rare Bird Alert

 

Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:

 

eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/

 


eBird report of Mississippi Kite from last night in Eagle (Ada Co)

Jay Carlisle
 

For those not receiving eBird rarity alerts, here's an intriguing report ... and he's right that late spring is the right time for "spring overshoot" vagrancy in this species.  In my experience, out of range kites in spring tend to be here 1 minute, and gone the next (or pretty soon anyway :-) but if anyone's in the area, could be worth a look.

Jay

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: ebird-alert@... <ebird-alert@...>
To: "carlislejay@..." <carlislejay@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 1, 2021, 1:15:39 AM MDT
Subject: [eBird Alert] Idaho Rare Bird Alert <hourly>

*** Species Summary:

Mississippi Kite (1 Ada)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <hourly> Idaho Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Idaho.  View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35737
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Mississippi Kite (Ictinia mississippiensis) (1)
- Reported May 31, 2021 19:30 by Kurt Radamaker
- Reid Merrill Park, Ada, Idaho
- Comments: "Sub adult.

My wife and I are avid birders visiting family in star Idaho from Scottsdale AZ for Memorial weekend. While eating dinner at coynes restaurant near reid merrill park, we had an unmistakable view of a miki. Size of white tailed kite, long tapered wings with dark primaries, dark underwing, chest, breast and belly marked with horizontal reddish streaks, longish dark tail. Not overall black and white as in white-tailed kite. The sighting was brief and without binoculars, but the bird was fairly close 25ft? It flew low over the tree tops.

With a lack of photos and the poor circumstances of this sighting, I certainly don't expect this sighting to go anywhere. The purpose of even putting this sighting in ebird is to alert Idaho birders of the possibility. I hope someone can go and check for it.

I have seen many miki and late may is an excellent time of year for one in Idaho!

I suspect if the bird is still around, it would be around the river and greenbelt.

Ps we spent a day at dangerfield jack looking for Cassia Crossbill without success &#x1f612;"

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Idaho Rare Bird Alert

Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:

eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


Re: Jason Talbot re: Orchard Gulch Trailhead

Scott Tuthill
 

Jason -- thanks for the note back. It makes sense now and I figured something like this was going on. The bottom mile of Orchard Gulch is riparian (at least the first 3/4 mile) then you start climbing up into the sage and bitterbrush hillsides. (BTW -- I had a singing Willow Flycatcher there about 1/2 mile up the trail from the trailhead -- surprised the heck out of me.) I have never gone beyond a mile in but I understand the trail connects with Five Mile and continues to the Ridge Road about 3 miles or so from the trailhead. By the time you get up that high you are back in the fir and pine zone. It sounds like the majority of your time, mileage, and list was on the trail after the first mile. I am going to have to go back up and spend a full day doing the whole trail like you did. That area is really a fun place to bird.

I vaguely have heard about and understand the eBird elevation filter issue. I know the intent is correct even if I always have to put in notes on various species like "not rare here". Maybe when there are more lists and data and eBird refines their processes it will smooth out. But, in the big scheme of things its not a big deal. I spend the winters outside of Tucson, Pima County. The counties in Arizona are huge with even more varied terrain than Ada County. The eBird reviewers for the county worked with eBird and have the county broken up into 20 or 30 different sub areas. (I know I have heard the number, I just don't remember it.) It was a pilot, first of a kind, project with eBird. Folk lore has it that after it was done eBird said - "we aren't really ready to do this sort of thing".

Thanks again for the reply. Hope to run into you out in the field.

Scott Tuthill


Re: Jason Talbot re: Orchard Gulch Trailhead

Jason Talbot
 

Good grief, time for me to go to bed. I got into more than I intended. The main habitats in the area above the elevation threshold are riparian, sage, hence the Brewers Sparrows, and coniferous.

There are also clusters of Cottonwoods in the riparian area that have produced some Red-eyed Vireos. Some bitter brush mixed in with sage has also produced some Blue-gray Gnatcatchers and Bushtits.

Within a 3 mile hike you can hit all these habitats with a great variety of species. It’s a fun area to bird. Plus I’ve seen two Bears on two different occasions as a bonus!

May God bless and help us sustain the freedoms of this nation! Thanks to all the Veterans who have served our country! Today was a good and humbling day as I’ve thought about your sacrifice.

Good night! 


On Monday, May 31, 2021, 09:25:45 PM MDT, Jason Talbot via groups.io <jason.talbot1@...> wrote:


I take back one comment. I guess I am dealing with two different habitats within the 5 mile rule on two different trail names, not to mention the road. Riparian and deciduous. You’d most likely not see a Pileated Woodpecker in the riparian section of Orchard Gulch but you might get lucky and hear one.

Jason

On Monday, May 31, 2021, 09:13:12 PM MDT, Jason Talbot <jason.talbot1@...> wrote:


Hello,

For those unaware of this area, it is in the upper Boise foothills and highest elevation in Ada County. It is down the ridge a few miles from Intermountain Bird Observatory where Boise State has a banding station for owls, raptors and songbirds. 

We get a variety of birds in a few miles of upper elevation along the ridge not seen anywhere else in the county. Pileated Woodpecker for example. Species also vary by season. For example, if I remember correctly, Yellow Warbler flags (rare) earlier in spring at higher elevations when they’re in the valley but don’t get flagged currently. 

Anyway, I continued up the trail onto upper Five Mile Gulch (not road) to the summit and across the summit on the road for a little ways. I hiked up the Orchard Gulch Trail a mile or so before I started my checklist for reasons I won’t go into. I normally start my list at the trailhead. The birds you mentioned were all above tree line.

There’s an elevation filter in eBird between Five Mile and Orchard Gulch Trails as you drive up Shaw Mountain Road. Therefore, I include Upper Five Mile Gulch Trail on my Orchard Gulch list when I continue past where they intersect because of elevation change. If not, it flags many birds as rare because of the higher elevation if I were to include them on my Five Mile Gulch Trail list; which starts below the elevation threshold whereas Orchard Gulch Trail starts above the elevation threshold.

I wish the higher elevation filter were a little less sensitive but it will get dialed in eventually with enough birders reporting in that area. I’ve learned to be patient after going through some frustration because I see the wisdom in creating the elevation filter.

For example, I consistently see Black-headed Grosbeaks, Brewer’s Sparrow and swallows at the higher elevations to name a few. There are still some riparian areas above the elevation threshold as well so you’ll see a Catbird and lower elevation birds every once in a while. Chats are regulars at Orchard Gulch that get flagged.

I’d hate to see an Ada County checklist without an elevation filter that would include Cassin’s Finch as a year round option in the valley when they’re typically seen a few weeks in the spring and fall with a few exceptions yet they’re year round up top. There are several birds that fit this category. It creates a lot more identification mistakes in eBird from new birders.

Good, bad or indifferent, that’s what I decided to do since it’s similar habitat. I’m open to suggestions. I normally keep those details in the comments section but I didn’t this time. That would have helped in this situation and perhaps make this a nonissue.

The other options were create 2 checklists (not) but I’m under the 5 mile rule in the same habitat or create another hotspot which I would be opposed to. 

I liked the way I did it but I should have added comments on how I hiked it.

I think this makes for a good discussion on a couple of topics if others have thoughts.

Jason 

On Monday, May 31, 2021, 10:40:01 AM MDT, Scott Tuthill <satuthill@...> wrote:


Jason -- I believe you monitor this forum so I hope to contact you this way. I saw your eBird list of May 28 from Orchard Gulch Trailhead. I was there the same day a couple hours after you as well as yesterday. Your list has many birds on it I totally missed and I am interested in how you bird that area to see them. Some birds that stand out were: Hairy and Pileated Woodpecker, Clark's Nutcracker, the nuthatches, Brown Creeper, and Dark-eyed Juncos.  I walked up the trail itself and never came across any of these birds. Did you walk up the road from the trailhead to the summit? Any thoughts would be appreciated. You can reach me here or at satuthill at gmail dot com. Thanks in advance.

Scott Tuthill


Re: Jason Talbot re: Orchard Gulch Trailhead

Jason Talbot
 

I take back one comment. I guess I am dealing with two different habitats within the 5 mile rule on two different trail names, not to mention the road. Riparian and deciduous. You’d most likely not see a Pileated Woodpecker in the riparian section of Orchard Gulch but you might get lucky and hear one.

Jason

On Monday, May 31, 2021, 09:13:12 PM MDT, Jason Talbot <jason.talbot1@...> wrote:


Hello,

For those unaware of this area, it is in the upper Boise foothills and highest elevation in Ada County. It is down the ridge a few miles from Intermountain Bird Observatory where Boise State has a banding station for owls, raptors and songbirds. 

We get a variety of birds in a few miles of upper elevation along the ridge not seen anywhere else in the county. Pileated Woodpecker for example. Species also vary by season. For example, if I remember correctly, Yellow Warbler flags (rare) earlier in spring at higher elevations when they’re in the valley but don’t get flagged currently. 

Anyway, I continued up the trail onto upper Five Mile Gulch (not road) to the summit and across the summit on the road for a little ways. I hiked up the Orchard Gulch Trail a mile or so before I started my checklist for reasons I won’t go into. I normally start my list at the trailhead. The birds you mentioned were all above tree line.

There’s an elevation filter in eBird between Five Mile and Orchard Gulch Trails as you drive up Shaw Mountain Road. Therefore, I include Upper Five Mile Gulch Trail on my Orchard Gulch list when I continue past where they intersect because of elevation change. If not, it flags many birds as rare because of the higher elevation if I were to include them on my Five Mile Gulch Trail list; which starts below the elevation threshold whereas Orchard Gulch Trail starts above the elevation threshold.

I wish the higher elevation filter were a little less sensitive but it will get dialed in eventually with enough birders reporting in that area. I’ve learned to be patient after going through some frustration because I see the wisdom in creating the elevation filter.

For example, I consistently see Black-headed Grosbeaks, Brewer’s Sparrow and swallows at the higher elevations to name a few. There are still some riparian areas above the elevation threshold as well so you’ll see a Catbird and lower elevation birds every once in a while. Chats are regulars at Orchard Gulch that get flagged.

I’d hate to see an Ada County checklist without an elevation filter that would include Cassin’s Finch as a year round option in the valley when they’re typically seen a few weeks in the spring and fall with a few exceptions yet they’re year round up top. There are several birds that fit this category. It creates a lot more identification mistakes in eBird from new birders.

Good, bad or indifferent, that’s what I decided to do since it’s similar habitat. I’m open to suggestions. I normally keep those details in the comments section but I didn’t this time. That would have helped in this situation and perhaps make this a nonissue.

The other options were create 2 checklists (not) but I’m under the 5 mile rule in the same habitat or create another hotspot which I would be opposed to. 

I liked the way I did it but I should have added comments on how I hiked it.

I think this makes for a good discussion on a couple of topics if others have thoughts.

Jason 

On Monday, May 31, 2021, 10:40:01 AM MDT, Scott Tuthill <satuthill@...> wrote:


Jason -- I believe you monitor this forum so I hope to contact you this way. I saw your eBird list of May 28 from Orchard Gulch Trailhead. I was there the same day a couple hours after you as well as yesterday. Your list has many birds on it I totally missed and I am interested in how you bird that area to see them. Some birds that stand out were: Hairy and Pileated Woodpecker, Clark's Nutcracker, the nuthatches, Brown Creeper, and Dark-eyed Juncos.  I walked up the trail itself and never came across any of these birds. Did you walk up the road from the trailhead to the summit? Any thoughts would be appreciated. You can reach me here or at satuthill at gmail dot com. Thanks in advance.

Scott Tuthill


Re: Jason Talbot re: Orchard Gulch Trailhead

Jason Talbot
 

Hello,

For those unaware of this area, it is in the upper Boise foothills and highest elevation in Ada County. It is down the ridge a few miles from Intermountain Bird Observatory where Boise State has a banding station for owls, raptors and songbirds. 

We get a variety of birds in a few miles of upper elevation along the ridge not seen anywhere else in the county. Pileated Woodpecker for example. Species also vary by season. For example, if I remember correctly, Yellow Warbler flags (rare) earlier in spring at higher elevations when they’re in the valley but don’t get flagged currently. 

Anyway, I continued up the trail onto upper Five Mile Gulch (not road) to the summit and across the summit on the road for a little ways. I hiked up the Orchard Gulch Trail a mile or so before I started my checklist for reasons I won’t go into. I normally start my list at the trailhead. The birds you mentioned were all above tree line.

There’s an elevation filter in eBird between Five Mile and Orchard Gulch Trails as you drive up Shaw Mountain Road. Therefore, I include Upper Five Mile Gulch Trail on my Orchard Gulch list when I continue past where they intersect because of elevation change. If not, it flags many birds as rare because of the higher elevation if I were to include them on my Five Mile Gulch Trail list; which starts below the elevation threshold whereas Orchard Gulch Trail starts above the elevation threshold.

I wish the higher elevation filter were a little less sensitive but it will get dialed in eventually with enough birders reporting in that area. I’ve learned to be patient after going through some frustration because I see the wisdom in creating the elevation filter.

For example, I consistently see Black-headed Grosbeaks, Brewer’s Sparrow and swallows at the higher elevations to name a few. There are still some riparian areas above the elevation threshold as well so you’ll see a Catbird and lower elevation birds every once in a while. Chats are regulars at Orchard Gulch that get flagged.

I’d hate to see an Ada County checklist without an elevation filter that would include Cassin’s Finch as a year round option in the valley when they’re typically seen a few weeks in the spring and fall with a few exceptions yet they’re year round up top. There are several birds that fit this category. It creates a lot more identification mistakes in eBird from new birders.

Good, bad or indifferent, that’s what I decided to do since it’s similar habitat. I’m open to suggestions. I normally keep those details in the comments section but I didn’t this time. That would have helped in this situation and perhaps make this a nonissue.

The other options were create 2 checklists (not) but I’m under the 5 mile rule in the same habitat or create another hotspot which I would be opposed to. 

I liked the way I did it but I should have added comments on how I hiked it.

I think this makes for a good discussion on a couple of topics if others have thoughts.

Jason 

On Monday, May 31, 2021, 10:40:01 AM MDT, Scott Tuthill <satuthill@...> wrote:


Jason -- I believe you monitor this forum so I hope to contact you this way. I saw your eBird list of May 28 from Orchard Gulch Trailhead. I was there the same day a couple hours after you as well as yesterday. Your list has many birds on it I totally missed and I am interested in how you bird that area to see them. Some birds that stand out were: Hairy and Pileated Woodpecker, Clark's Nutcracker, the nuthatches, Brown Creeper, and Dark-eyed Juncos.  I walked up the trail itself and never came across any of these birds. Did you walk up the road from the trailhead to the summit? Any thoughts would be appreciated. You can reach me here or at satuthill at gmail dot com. Thanks in advance.

Scott Tuthill


Jason Talbot re: Orchard Gulch Trailhead

Scott Tuthill
 

Jason -- I believe you monitor this forum so I hope to contact you this way. I saw your eBird list of May 28 from Orchard Gulch Trailhead. I was there the same day a couple hours after you as well as yesterday. Your list has many birds on it I totally missed and I am interested in how you bird that area to see them. Some birds that stand out were: Hairy and Pileated Woodpecker, Clark's Nutcracker, the nuthatches, Brown Creeper, and Dark-eyed Juncos.  I walked up the trail itself and never came across any of these birds. Did you walk up the road from the trailhead to the summit? Any thoughts would be appreciated. You can reach me here or at satuthill at gmail dot com. Thanks in advance.

Scott Tuthill


Re: N Catbird

lcarrigan_55
 

Appreciate the responses. Given your response, Bill, was hoping some House Wrens would show today, but no luck. However, don't give up hope on the BH-RB Grosbeak hybrid, the first that appeared on our place sev yrs ago was a hybrid, just like Sibley's. 

Hadn't seen the RB Grosbeak since last WK, but appeared briefly at feeder this AM. Also, Bullock's Oriole & W Tanager. Added the orange slice/grape jelly feeder today.

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: N Catbird

cheryl huizinga
 

I’ll add to the “House Wrens -  Where Are They Question”.  I have seen/heard several at Deer Flat Refuge in Nampa and when birding out and about in SW Idaho, but we have had them nesting in our yard for several years but not this year.  And I’m not seeing/hearing as many as in past.

Cheryl in Caldwell

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Elizabeth Medes
Sent: Saturday, May 29, 2021 6:12 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: Re: [IBLE] N Catbird

 

Odd... I'm hearing house wrens nearly every day except in our backyard, where they set up housekeeping last year in a super deluxe bungalow hand-made and painted by a friend in Boise.  I'll just have to be patient.  Catbirds are in Montour WMA; chats, lazulis, and yellow warblers all in their quarters, nearby kestrels have fledged, saw female western tanagers this a.m. on Shalerock Rd, near Black Canyon Res.  Surprise Dusky flycatcher at Emmett Wastewater Treatment Plant this afternoon.

 

And that's the Gem County minute,

 

Liz Medes

 

On Sat, May 29, 2021 at 3:52 PM lcarrigan_55 via groups.io <lcarrigan_55=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

New arrival today is a N Catbird. Plenty of BH Grosbeaks, Lazuli Buntings & Yellow Warblers here. Finally saw a W Tanager yest AM. Curiously absent are House Wrens. Have seen a total of 2, this spring, over 3 wk apart. Usually, by now, already building their nests. And know where at least 4 should be nesting. Zero around for past 10 days. Do have a robin nesting under eave of garage at bend in gutter downspout. And have seen a Wild Turkey with 2 young fluff balls trotting beneath her. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot

 


Re: N Catbird

Elizabeth Medes
 

Odd... I'm hearing house wrens nearly every day except in our backyard, where they set up housekeeping last year in a super deluxe bungalow hand-made and painted by a friend in Boise.  I'll just have to be patient.  Catbirds are in Montour WMA; chats, lazulis, and yellow warblers all in their quarters, nearby kestrels have fledged, saw female western tanagers this a.m. on Shalerock Rd, near Black Canyon Res.  Surprise Dusky flycatcher at Emmett Wastewater Treatment Plant this afternoon.

And that's the Gem County minute,

Liz Medes

On Sat, May 29, 2021 at 3:52 PM lcarrigan_55 via groups.io <lcarrigan_55=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
New arrival today is a N Catbird. Plenty of BH Grosbeaks, Lazuli Buntings & Yellow Warblers here. Finally saw a W Tanager yest AM. Curiously absent are House Wrens. Have seen a total of 2, this spring, over 3 wk apart. Usually, by now, already building their nests. And know where at least 4 should be nesting. Zero around for past 10 days. Do have a robin nesting under eave of garage at bend in gutter downspout. And have seen a Wild Turkey with 2 young fluff balls trotting beneath her. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: N Catbird

Bill Moore
 

Our house wrens showed up en masse yesterday. I saw at least five at one time and they seem to be staking out usual sites around the house, in the woods and at the barn. Interesting thing was one of the first had a faulty, unusual song. When the gang appeared the faulty song stopped and everyone is now singing familiar refrain. You’d think it would have heard right song in winter range. They are a full month later than last year.

We’ve got hummers hitting feeders, but at a rate that’s about a third the rate over the last several years. They showed up on time however. I wonder if bird disease is reducing their numbers. I see no evidence of sick or slower birds however.

Lots of Lazuli and BH Grosbeaks and Cassins are still hanging out as are SIskens. My latest project is trying to turn some of the BH into BH/Rosebreasted hybrids per Sibley. As usual Evenings fled when BH appeared. Turkeys encourage dogs to want to get up and chase them out back at about 5:45 AM most mornings.

Bill Moore
Hoot Owl
Inkom

On May 29, 2021, at 4:11 PM, lcarrigan_55 via groups.io <lcarrigan_55@...> wrote:

Sorry, meant Gray Catbird! Had Northern on my mind, as had been talking to another birder about N Goshawk sightings this past winter. 

Brian Carrigan


Re: N Catbird

lcarrigan_55
 

Sorry, meant Gray Catbird! Had Northern on my mind, as had been talking to another birder about N Goshawk sightings this past winter. 

Brian Carrigan


N Catbird

lcarrigan_55
 

New arrival today is a N Catbird. Plenty of BH Grosbeaks, Lazuli Buntings & Yellow Warblers here. Finally saw a W Tanager yest AM. Curiously absent are House Wrens. Have seen a total of 2, this spring, over 3 wk apart. Usually, by now, already building their nests. And know where at least 4 should be nesting. Zero around for past 10 days. Do have a robin nesting under eave of garage at bend in gutter downspout. And have seen a Wild Turkey with 2 young fluff balls trotting beneath her. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: Jack,s creek

Cliff Weisse
 

Merlin is wrong. If nothing else the wing tips are too dark for Glaucous. The iris appears pale so I'd be thinking Ring-billed but it's hard to tell from this one photo...

Cliff


On 5/27/21 9:23 PM, Robert Kiernan wrote:
26  27th camped Wednesday night.        Terns. Comm   .blk. Caspian   foresters. 15  20 Ibis flying  50 pelicans doz. Corms. W.w.peewee bull. Oriole yellow warb.song sparrow. Marsh wren snipe osprey west & Clark's grebe. Gadwall.  Gulls California  ring bill. Merlin says this one glaucous  also willow fly cat. 
-- 
Cliff and Lisa Weisse
Island Park, Idaho
cliffandlisa@...


Jack,s creek

Robert Kiernan
 

26  27th camped Wednesday night.        Terns. Comm   .blk. Caspian   foresters. 15  20 Ibis flying  50 pelicans doz. Corms. W.w.peewee bull. Oriole yellow warb.song sparrow. Marsh wren snipe osprey west & Clark's grebe. Gadwall.  Gulls California  ring bill. Merlin says this one glaucous  also willow fly cat. 


Re: Tame Red Crossbill's

Balaeniceps rex <41onesweetworld@...>
 

Forgot to attach a photo of the sick HOFI. 💔

Gina in Emmett.

The bluebird carries the sky on his back”~Henry David Thoreau



On May 25, 2021, at 1:00 PM, Balaeniceps rex via groups.io <41onesweetworld@...> wrote:

Yesterday I had three sick female species of HOFI, PISI, and HOSP. The HOFI had labored breathing, sleepy eyes, and food stuck at the corner of her mouth. All three exhibited no fear as I walked towards them and knew right away they were sick. I had just disinfected and washed the feeders that day and had them out to air dry. I put up clean ones stored in the shed but took them down as soon as I noticed the sick birds. I will disinfect them and also drain and disinfect all water features today. 

It makes me so sad to see them suffer.

I’m in Emmett. 

Sincerely,

Gina

“The bluebird carries the sky on his back”~Henry David Thoreau



On May 25, 2021, at 11:27 AM, Heidi Ware Carlisle <heidithebirdnerd@...> wrote:


Not to be a Debbie Downer, but quite often these "tame" birds, especially those in the finch family, are actually sick. There is an outbreak of Salmonellosis this year among siskins, finches, and crossbills. It seems to have subsided in some areas but not all. Last week in Idaho City I visited a feeder setup and saw a number of infected Cassin's Finches, so it is still going around.

You can tell infected birds because they will be slow to fly away, not-wary of people, may have fluffed up feathers and look "fatter" compared to other individuals of the same species. The birds often sit on the feeder and eat voraciously until the late stages of the disease. 
They may also be more "blinky" or sleepy, and may be unable to fly or have weak flight. Up close if the disease is severe you will hear clicking or scratchy labored breathing.

In this case it certainly sounds like you have sick birds. It is important to take your feeder down and bleach it with a 10% bleach solution. Leave the feeders down for at least two weeks to allow sick birds to disperse. When hanging feeders back up, be sure to watch frequently for sick birds and remove the feeders again if sick birds reappear. Even if no sick birds are spotted, continue to bleach your feeders with a 10% bleach solution at least once a week.
The sickness is spread through droppings so be sure to remove any dropping accumulations by raking the ground, and remove any accumulated seed on the ground. Bird baths and flat platform feeders also accumulate droppings and should be removed.

Of note, just because you have sick birds on your feeders doesn't mean it's your fault. Even if you have the cleanest feeder around, if even one of your neighbors has a poorly cleaned feeder, the disease will continue to spread. All we can do is remove our feeders when we spot sick birds, and help spread the word to others in the area to take their feeders down too.

Here's a link to the IDFG Salmonella updates. The headline says southern Idaho but this outbreak has been seen throughout Idaho and many other western states. https://idfg.idaho.gov/press/southern-idaho-residents-encouraged-temporarily-remove-bird-feeders-due-suspected-outbreak

Heidi 
Intermountain Bird Observatory

On Tue, May 25, 2021 at 11:12 AM Dave & Brenda Pace <dbpace@q.com> wrote:
We have had a flock of about 10 Red Crossbill's hitting our feeders for the last week.  Yesterday I decided the feeders were getting a little low so went out to the garage and got the seed bucket and started walking into the front yard.  Most all the birds flushed but not the Crossbill's feeding on the feeder.  I slowly walked right up to 4 of them.  One of them was on a metal branch on the feeder stand without access to any seeds so I slowly took a scoop of the seeds and raised it up to the Crossbill and he just sat there and ate out of the scoop until my arm got tired.  I am amazed that wild birds could be so approachable.

I was curious if anyone else had experienced anything like this with them before and if that was a common trait they exhibit.

Thanks
Dave Pace
Idaho Falls, ID (Westside)


Re: Tame Red Crossbill's

Balaeniceps rex <41onesweetworld@...>
 

Yesterday I had three sick female species of HOFI, PISI, and HOSP. The HOFI had labored breathing, sleepy eyes, and food stuck at the corner of her mouth. All three exhibited no fear as I walked towards them and knew right away they were sick. I had just disinfected and washed the feeders that day and had them out to air dry. I put up clean ones stored in the shed but took them down as soon as I noticed the sick birds. I will disinfect them and also drain and disinfect all water features today. 

It makes me so sad to see them suffer.

I’m in Emmett. 

Sincerely,

Gina

“The bluebird carries the sky on his back”~Henry David Thoreau



On May 25, 2021, at 11:27 AM, Heidi Ware Carlisle <heidithebirdnerd@...> wrote:


Not to be a Debbie Downer, but quite often these "tame" birds, especially those in the finch family, are actually sick. There is an outbreak of Salmonellosis this year among siskins, finches, and crossbills. It seems to have subsided in some areas but not all. Last week in Idaho City I visited a feeder setup and saw a number of infected Cassin's Finches, so it is still going around.

You can tell infected birds because they will be slow to fly away, not-wary of people, may have fluffed up feathers and look "fatter" compared to other individuals of the same species. The birds often sit on the feeder and eat voraciously until the late stages of the disease. 
They may also be more "blinky" or sleepy, and may be unable to fly or have weak flight. Up close if the disease is severe you will hear clicking or scratchy labored breathing.

In this case it certainly sounds like you have sick birds. It is important to take your feeder down and bleach it with a 10% bleach solution. Leave the feeders down for at least two weeks to allow sick birds to disperse. When hanging feeders back up, be sure to watch frequently for sick birds and remove the feeders again if sick birds reappear. Even if no sick birds are spotted, continue to bleach your feeders with a 10% bleach solution at least once a week.
The sickness is spread through droppings so be sure to remove any dropping accumulations by raking the ground, and remove any accumulated seed on the ground. Bird baths and flat platform feeders also accumulate droppings and should be removed.

Of note, just because you have sick birds on your feeders doesn't mean it's your fault. Even if you have the cleanest feeder around, if even one of your neighbors has a poorly cleaned feeder, the disease will continue to spread. All we can do is remove our feeders when we spot sick birds, and help spread the word to others in the area to take their feeders down too.

Here's a link to the IDFG Salmonella updates. The headline says southern Idaho but this outbreak has been seen throughout Idaho and many other western states. https://idfg.idaho.gov/press/southern-idaho-residents-encouraged-temporarily-remove-bird-feeders-due-suspected-outbreak

Heidi 
Intermountain Bird Observatory

On Tue, May 25, 2021 at 11:12 AM Dave & Brenda Pace <dbpace@q.com> wrote:
We have had a flock of about 10 Red Crossbill's hitting our feeders for the last week.  Yesterday I decided the feeders were getting a little low so went out to the garage and got the seed bucket and started walking into the front yard.  Most all the birds flushed but not the Crossbill's feeding on the feeder.  I slowly walked right up to 4 of them.  One of them was on a metal branch on the feeder stand without access to any seeds so I slowly took a scoop of the seeds and raised it up to the Crossbill and he just sat there and ate out of the scoop until my arm got tired.  I am amazed that wild birds could be so approachable.

I was curious if anyone else had experienced anything like this with them before and if that was a common trait they exhibit.

Thanks
Dave Pace
Idaho Falls, ID (Westside)


Re: Tame Red Crossbill's

Heidi Ware Carlisle
 

Not to be a Debbie Downer, but quite often these "tame" birds, especially those in the finch family, are actually sick. There is an outbreak of Salmonellosis this year among siskins, finches, and crossbills. It seems to have subsided in some areas but not all. Last week in Idaho City I visited a feeder setup and saw a number of infected Cassin's Finches, so it is still going around.

You can tell infected birds because they will be slow to fly away, not-wary of people, may have fluffed up feathers and look "fatter" compared to other individuals of the same species. The birds often sit on the feeder and eat voraciously until the late stages of the disease. 
They may also be more "blinky" or sleepy, and may be unable to fly or have weak flight. Up close if the disease is severe you will hear clicking or scratchy labored breathing.

In this case it certainly sounds like you have sick birds. It is important to take your feeder down and bleach it with a 10% bleach solution. Leave the feeders down for at least two weeks to allow sick birds to disperse. When hanging feeders back up, be sure to watch frequently for sick birds and remove the feeders again if sick birds reappear. Even if no sick birds are spotted, continue to bleach your feeders with a 10% bleach solution at least once a week.
The sickness is spread through droppings so be sure to remove any dropping accumulations by raking the ground, and remove any accumulated seed on the ground. Bird baths and flat platform feeders also accumulate droppings and should be removed.

Of note, just because you have sick birds on your feeders doesn't mean it's your fault. Even if you have the cleanest feeder around, if even one of your neighbors has a poorly cleaned feeder, the disease will continue to spread. All we can do is remove our feeders when we spot sick birds, and help spread the word to others in the area to take their feeders down too.

Here's a link to the IDFG Salmonella updates. The headline says southern Idaho but this outbreak has been seen throughout Idaho and many other western states. https://idfg.idaho.gov/press/southern-idaho-residents-encouraged-temporarily-remove-bird-feeders-due-suspected-outbreak

Heidi 
Intermountain Bird Observatory

On Tue, May 25, 2021 at 11:12 AM Dave & Brenda Pace <dbpace@q.com> wrote:
We have had a flock of about 10 Red Crossbill's hitting our feeders for the last week.  Yesterday I decided the feeders were getting a little low so went out to the garage and got the seed bucket and started walking into the front yard.  Most all the birds flushed but not the Crossbill's feeding on the feeder.  I slowly walked right up to 4 of them.  One of them was on a metal branch on the feeder stand without access to any seeds so I slowly took a scoop of the seeds and raised it up to the Crossbill and he just sat there and ate out of the scoop until my arm got tired.  I am amazed that wild birds could be so approachable.

I was curious if anyone else had experienced anything like this with them before and if that was a common trait they exhibit.

Thanks
Dave Pace
Idaho Falls, ID (Westside)


Tame Red Crossbill's

Dave & Brenda Pace
 

We have had a flock of about 10 Red Crossbill's hitting our feeders for the last week.  Yesterday I decided the feeders were getting a little low so went out to the garage and got the seed bucket and started walking into the front yard.  Most all the birds flushed but not the Crossbill's feeding on the feeder.  I slowly walked right up to 4 of them.  One of them was on a metal branch on the feeder stand without access to any seeds so I slowly took a scoop of the seeds and raised it up to the Crossbill and he just sat there and ate out of the scoop until my arm got tired.  I am amazed that wild birds could be so approachable.

I was curious if anyone else had experienced anything like this with them before and if that was a common trait they exhibit.

Thanks
Dave Pace
Idaho Falls, ID (Westside)


2 New Arrivals

lcarrigan_55
 

Have found a Swainson's Thrush & an Empid that wasn't calling & most likely, for here, was a Dusky Flycatcher, but was wagging tail "downward" which Sibley's indicates would be a Gray. Unfortunately, wasn't calling. Rounded head, grayish overall with no olive or yellowish & indistinct upper wing bar. Was flycatching just above our coldwater, spring channel that leads to the Snake River & lined with sandbar willows & narrowleaf cottonwoods. Mainly staying at about a 4-5' level. 

No sighting of the RB Grosbeak today, but plenty of BH Grosbeaks, Lazuli Buntings & House Finches. A pair of Black-chinned Hummingbirds is hitting the nectar feeder. Believe the female is nest-building in the blue spruce on west side of house. One, lone Pine Siskin to the thistle feeder yesterday evening, but the large numbers are gone. Yellow Warblers are numerous. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot

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