Date   

Re: a reminder about owl nesting season and giving owls space

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


Jay, excellent note and a very important reminder.  

Inspired me to revisit the BOW species accounts (Birds of the World, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY) of owls that have been documented in Idaho, mainly to refresh my understanding of their breeding seasons, e.g., species-specific dates for the onset of pair-bonding, nest site inspection and selection, etc.  I took a few notes and compared them with eBird bar charts for Idaho (migrant owls in particular), and although these are just "rough draft notes" I thought I'd share them with birders on IBLE (see attached). 

Just for fun, on a snowy day in River City,  
Larry
 


From: "Jay Carlisle via groups.io" <carlislejay@...>
To: "IBLE" <ible@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 10:45:43 AM
Subject: [IBLE] a reminder about owl nesting season and giving owls space

Lots of you know this already but this is an especially sensitive time of year for nesting owls.  With all bird species I'm familiar with (i.e., I've studied their nesting ecology and/or read scientific literature), they are much more likely to abandon a nesting attempt early in the nesting cycle - i.e., during courtship, nest-building, and early incubation.  And, since many owls begin nesting quite early (as early as January for Great Horned and a month or 2 later for some others), the next couple months are the time when most owls will feel most vulnerable or stressed.

 

For owl species that nest in shorter trees/shrubs (i.e., willows) and/or in smaller thickets of vegetation surrounded by open country, they have less room to hide and are more likely to flush when approached by a human or predator.  If they do flush, I imagine it's likely much more stressful than for a forest owl flushing from one tree to the next.  Importantly, flushing can expose them to diurnal predators, including ravens.  Even if they aren't being flushed each time, for owls are nesting in a popular birding area there's potential for repeated visits (by different birders or the same person/people returning to a favorite birding site) to cause a much higher cumulative stress load than a site than only receives an occasional visitor - and this could lead to a failed or abandoned nesting attempt.

 

I say all this to suggest that people be careful/deliberate in approaching known or suspected nesting sites.  Any isolated clumps of willows or other shrubs/trees could be suitable nesting habitat.  I'm including a couple pictures that Heidi has from fieldwork around the state that show potential nesting habitat.  And, for fun, a picture of a fledgling Saw-whet I found during some surveys many years ago in a riparian draw many miles away from conifer forest (this was June and after fledging so a less stressful time for this bird & its parents - but I still backed away quickly to keep it from flushing). 

If you do see an owl, please keep your distance.  After all, we all care about birds and know that they have many additional stressors in this modern world.  And, what's more important?  A better look at or photo of an owl or birds being able to nest in peace without too much disturbance/too many approaches?

 

Thanks for your time and please feel free to pass this on!


Jay



Re: Owls / roadkill

M Gregory
 

Thanks Larry. I have been posting pics and field notes of roadkill to Idaho Fish and Game, through its web site. And I talked with an agency biologist at one point. She, in turn, sent me links to academic/research papers. In 1989, upon settling in Pennsylvania, I began keeping a journal in which I listed the species, date and location of any wildlife (birds, reptiles, amphibians, mammals and butterflies) I found during walks. I am in my fifth journal now and my tally of species is well over 250 now.
Alan


On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 10:16 AM Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:

Alan,
several yrs ago we discussed this briefly on IBLE
I believe Stoddard Davenport reported some crazy high numbers of roadkill Barn Owls along I-84 that he had found with a bit of research ?  and my hunch is that Stoddard was referencing the two docs that Karl K mentioned earlier today ?

Anyway, on one of our trips from Boise to Twin Falls to visit our daughter and family, we counted them along both directions of I-84...
I'm not finding my notes at the moment, but I think we tallied abt 130 easily visible dead Barn Owls...  very sad to see
Larry Arnold


From: "M Gregory" <alanclarkg@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 4:51:59 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Owls

Since moving to Mountain Home, and bicycling as much as possible, I have recorded and photographed dozens of roadkill owls, principally Barn Owls, but also Great Horned, Screech and Short-eared.
This is only an anecdote, but I cannot help but consider that human activities, like driving a motor vehicle, are the greatest cause of owl mortality. Here are pics of two of the dead Barn Owls (Tyto alba) I found in recent weeks.
Alan Gregory in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association





--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association



Re: Owls / roadkill

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


Alan,
several yrs ago we discussed this briefly on IBLE
I believe Stoddard Davenport reported some crazy high numbers of roadkill Barn Owls along I-84 that he had found with a bit of research ?  and my hunch is that Stoddard was referencing the two docs that Karl K mentioned earlier today ?

Anyway, on one of our trips from Boise to Twin Falls to visit our daughter and family, we counted them along both directions of I-84...
I'm not finding my notes at the moment, but I think we tallied abt 130 easily visible dead Barn Owls...  very sad to see
Larry Arnold



From: "M Gregory" <alanclarkg@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 4:51:59 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Owls

Since moving to Mountain Home, and bicycling as much as possible, I have recorded and photographed dozens of roadkill owls, principally Barn Owls, but also Great Horned, Screech and Short-eared.
This is only an anecdote, but I cannot help but consider that human activities, like driving a motor vehicle, are the greatest cause of owl mortality. Here are pics of two of the dead Barn Owls (Tyto alba) I found in recent weeks.
Alan Gregory in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association




Re: Owls

Karl Kosciuch
 

There has been several research efforts on this topic including a transportation analysis - links below. 



Owls

M Gregory
 

Since moving to Mountain Home, and bicycling as much as possible, I have recorded and photographed dozens of roadkill owls, principally Barn Owls, but also Great Horned, Screech and Short-eared.
This is only an anecdote, but I cannot help but consider that human activities, like driving a motor vehicle, are the greatest cause of owl mortality. Here are pics of two of the dead Barn Owls (Tyto alba) I found in recent weeks.
Alan Gregory in Mountain Home

--



 

Alan C Gregory
Lt. Col., USAF, Ret.
Mountain Home, ID
Air Force Public Affairs Alumni Association, life member
Member, North American Butterfly Association



Re: a reminder about owl nesting season and giving owls space

rattlesnake4873
 

One December long ago I chanced upon two GHOW mating in cottonwood trees in CAs high desert, so I am not surprised that they begin courtship here in February.

Thank you for relaying this cautionary advice. I hope it is heeded.

Dean

On Fri, Feb 12, 2021 at 9:47 AM Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Lots of you know this already but this is an especially sensitive time of year for nesting owls.  With all bird species I'm familiar with (i.e., I've studied their nesting ecology and/or read scientific literature), they are much more likely to abandon a nesting attempt early in the nesting cycle - i.e., during courtship, nest-building, and early incubation.  And, since many owls begin nesting quite early (as early as January for Great Horned and a month or 2 later for some others), the next couple months are the time when most owls will feel most vulnerable or stressed.

 

For owl species that nest in shorter trees/shrubs (i.e., willows) and/or in smaller thickets of vegetation surrounded by open country, they have less room to hide and are more likely to flush when approached by a human or predator.  If they do flush, I imagine it's likely much more stressful than for a forest owl flushing from one tree to the next.  Importantly, flushing can expose them to diurnal predators, including ravens.  Even if they aren't being flushed each time, for owls are nesting in a popular birding area there's potential for repeated visits (by different birders or the same person/people returning to a favorite birding site) to cause a much higher cumulative stress load than a site than only receives an occasional visitor - and this could lead to a failed or abandoned nesting attempt.

 

I say all this to suggest that people be careful/deliberate in approaching known or suspected nesting sites.  Any isolated clumps of willows or other shrubs/trees could be suitable nesting habitat.  I'm including a couple pictures that Heidi has from fieldwork around the state that show potential nesting habitat.  And, for fun, a picture of a fledgling Saw-whet I found during some surveys many years ago in a riparian draw many miles away from conifer forest (this was June and after fledging so a less stressful time for this bird & its parents - but I still backed away quickly to keep it from flushing). 

If you do see an owl, please keep your distance.  After all, we all care about birds and know that they have many additional stressors in this modern world.  And, what's more important?  A better look at or photo of an owl or birds being able to nest in peace without too much disturbance/too many approaches?

 

Thanks for your time and please feel free to pass this on!


Jay

--
Dean Jones
"A world of facts lies outside and beyond the world of words." Thomas Huxley
208-859-0072


Re: a reminder about owl nesting season and giving owls space

rbird1286
 

Just a note, but I've just posted it on the two camera club Facebook pages we have in Treasure Valley.

Ruthann Greene

On Friday, February 12, 2021, 11:15:52 AM MST, Patricia Weber <birder1932@...> wrote:


Thanks for your gentle reminder.  Would you be willing to post this information to the Facebook page Idaho Birding.  Also could we share this information with our local Audubon groups?

Pat

On Fri, Feb 12, 2021 at 10:47 AM Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Lots of you know this already but this is an especially sensitive time of year for nesting owls.  With all bird species I'm familiar with (i.e., I've studied their nesting ecology and/or read scientific literature), they are much more likely to abandon a nesting attempt early in the nesting cycle - i.e., during courtship, nest-building, and early incubation.  And, since many owls begin nesting quite early (as early as January for Great Horned and a month or 2 later for some others), the next couple months are the time when most owls will feel most vulnerable or stressed.

 

For owl species that nest in shorter trees/shrubs (i.e., willows) and/or in smaller thickets of vegetation surrounded by open country, they have less room to hide and are more likely to flush when approached by a human or predator.  If they do flush, I imagine it's likely much more stressful than for a forest owl flushing from one tree to the next.  Importantly, flushing can expose them to diurnal predators, including ravens.  Even if they aren't being flushed each time, for owls are nesting in a popular birding area there's potential for repeated visits (by different birders or the same person/people returning to a favorite birding site) to cause a much higher cumulative stress load than a site than only receives an occasional visitor - and this could lead to a failed or abandoned nesting attempt.

 

I say all this to suggest that people be careful/deliberate in approaching known or suspected nesting sites.  Any isolated clumps of willows or other shrubs/trees could be suitable nesting habitat.  I'm including a couple pictures that Heidi has from fieldwork around the state that show potential nesting habitat.  And, for fun, a picture of a fledgling Saw-whet I found during some surveys many years ago in a riparian draw many miles away from conifer forest (this was June and after fledging so a less stressful time for this bird & its parents - but I still backed away quickly to keep it from flushing). 

If you do see an owl, please keep your distance.  After all, we all care about birds and know that they have many additional stressors in this modern world.  And, what's more important?  A better look at or photo of an owl or birds being able to nest in peace without too much disturbance/too many approaches?

 

Thanks for your time and please feel free to pass this on!


Jay


Re: a reminder about owl nesting season and giving owls space

John Shortis
 

Well said Jay.
When Amy and I visited the Great Gray in Montour last month we remained in our car, and it was remarkably confiding, even perching on a street sign at one point, about 50 feet away from us. Cars make excellent blinds sometimes!

John Shortis  

On Friday, February 12, 2021, 10:47:24 AM MST, Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay@...> wrote:


Lots of you know this already but this is an especially sensitive time of year for nesting owls.  With all bird species I'm familiar with (i.e., I've studied their nesting ecology and/or read scientific literature), they are much more likely to abandon a nesting attempt early in the nesting cycle - i.e., during courtship, nest-building, and early incubation.  And, since many owls begin nesting quite early (as early as January for Great Horned and a month or 2 later for some others), the next couple months are the time when most owls will feel most vulnerable or stressed.

 

For owl species that nest in shorter trees/shrubs (i.e., willows) and/or in smaller thickets of vegetation surrounded by open country, they have less room to hide and are more likely to flush when approached by a human or predator.  If they do flush, I imagine it's likely much more stressful than for a forest owl flushing from one tree to the next.  Importantly, flushing can expose them to diurnal predators, including ravens.  Even if they aren't being flushed each time, for owls are nesting in a popular birding area there's potential for repeated visits (by different birders or the same person/people returning to a favorite birding site) to cause a much higher cumulative stress load than a site than only receives an occasional visitor - and this could lead to a failed or abandoned nesting attempt.

 

I say all this to suggest that people be careful/deliberate in approaching known or suspected nesting sites.  Any isolated clumps of willows or other shrubs/trees could be suitable nesting habitat.  I'm including a couple pictures that Heidi has from fieldwork around the state that show potential nesting habitat.  And, for fun, a picture of a fledgling Saw-whet I found during some surveys many years ago in a riparian draw many miles away from conifer forest (this was June and after fledging so a less stressful time for this bird & its parents - but I still backed away quickly to keep it from flushing). 

If you do see an owl, please keep your distance.  After all, we all care about birds and know that they have many additional stressors in this modern world.  And, what's more important?  A better look at or photo of an owl or birds being able to nest in peace without too much disturbance/too many approaches?

 

Thanks for your time and please feel free to pass this on!


Jay


Re: a reminder about owl nesting season and giving owls space

Jay Carlisle
 

Facebook is coming next :-)

On Friday, February 12, 2021, 11:15:52 AM MST, Patricia Weber <birder1932@...> wrote:


Thanks for your gentle reminder.  Would you be willing to post this information to the Facebook page Idaho Birding.  Also could we share this information with our local Audubon groups?

Pat

On Fri, Feb 12, 2021 at 10:47 AM Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Lots of you know this already but this is an especially sensitive time of year for nesting owls.  With all bird species I'm familiar with (i.e., I've studied their nesting ecology and/or read scientific literature), they are much more likely to abandon a nesting attempt early in the nesting cycle - i.e., during courtship, nest-building, and early incubation.  And, since many owls begin nesting quite early (as early as January for Great Horned and a month or 2 later for some others), the next couple months are the time when most owls will feel most vulnerable or stressed.

 

For owl species that nest in shorter trees/shrubs (i.e., willows) and/or in smaller thickets of vegetation surrounded by open country, they have less room to hide and are more likely to flush when approached by a human or predator.  If they do flush, I imagine it's likely much more stressful than for a forest owl flushing from one tree to the next.  Importantly, flushing can expose them to diurnal predators, including ravens.  Even if they aren't being flushed each time, for owls are nesting in a popular birding area there's potential for repeated visits (by different birders or the same person/people returning to a favorite birding site) to cause a much higher cumulative stress load than a site than only receives an occasional visitor - and this could lead to a failed or abandoned nesting attempt.

 

I say all this to suggest that people be careful/deliberate in approaching known or suspected nesting sites.  Any isolated clumps of willows or other shrubs/trees could be suitable nesting habitat.  I'm including a couple pictures that Heidi has from fieldwork around the state that show potential nesting habitat.  And, for fun, a picture of a fledgling Saw-whet I found during some surveys many years ago in a riparian draw many miles away from conifer forest (this was June and after fledging so a less stressful time for this bird & its parents - but I still backed away quickly to keep it from flushing). 

If you do see an owl, please keep your distance.  After all, we all care about birds and know that they have many additional stressors in this modern world.  And, what's more important?  A better look at or photo of an owl or birds being able to nest in peace without too much disturbance/too many approaches?

 

Thanks for your time and please feel free to pass this on!


Jay


Re: a reminder about owl nesting season and giving owls space

Patricia Weber
 

Thanks for your gentle reminder.  Would you be willing to post this information to the Facebook page Idaho Birding.  Also could we share this information with our local Audubon groups?

Pat

On Fri, Feb 12, 2021 at 10:47 AM Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Lots of you know this already but this is an especially sensitive time of year for nesting owls.  With all bird species I'm familiar with (i.e., I've studied their nesting ecology and/or read scientific literature), they are much more likely to abandon a nesting attempt early in the nesting cycle - i.e., during courtship, nest-building, and early incubation.  And, since many owls begin nesting quite early (as early as January for Great Horned and a month or 2 later for some others), the next couple months are the time when most owls will feel most vulnerable or stressed.

 

For owl species that nest in shorter trees/shrubs (i.e., willows) and/or in smaller thickets of vegetation surrounded by open country, they have less room to hide and are more likely to flush when approached by a human or predator.  If they do flush, I imagine it's likely much more stressful than for a forest owl flushing from one tree to the next.  Importantly, flushing can expose them to diurnal predators, including ravens.  Even if they aren't being flushed each time, for owls are nesting in a popular birding area there's potential for repeated visits (by different birders or the same person/people returning to a favorite birding site) to cause a much higher cumulative stress load than a site than only receives an occasional visitor - and this could lead to a failed or abandoned nesting attempt.

 

I say all this to suggest that people be careful/deliberate in approaching known or suspected nesting sites.  Any isolated clumps of willows or other shrubs/trees could be suitable nesting habitat.  I'm including a couple pictures that Heidi has from fieldwork around the state that show potential nesting habitat.  And, for fun, a picture of a fledgling Saw-whet I found during some surveys many years ago in a riparian draw many miles away from conifer forest (this was June and after fledging so a less stressful time for this bird & its parents - but I still backed away quickly to keep it from flushing). 

If you do see an owl, please keep your distance.  After all, we all care about birds and know that they have many additional stressors in this modern world.  And, what's more important?  A better look at or photo of an owl or birds being able to nest in peace without too much disturbance/too many approaches?

 

Thanks for your time and please feel free to pass this on!


Jay


Re: a reminder about owl nesting season and giving owls space

Cliff Weisse
 

Thanks for the reminder Jay. I've been amazed how early owls will begin courtship and nesting. I once had a singing Saw-whet with a pair chasing each other around some junipers in a Canyon near Twin Falls in January. Doesn't seem like nesting season but???

Cliff

On 2/12/21 10:45 AM, Jay Carlisle via groups.io wrote:

Lots of you know this already but this is an especially sensitive time of year for nesting owls.  With all bird species I'm familiar with (i.e., I've studied their nesting ecology and/or read scientific literature), they are much more likely to abandon a nesting attempt early in the nesting cycle - i.e., during courtship, nest-building, and early incubation.  And, since many owls begin nesting quite early (as early as January for Great Horned and a month or 2 later for some others), the next couple months are the time when most owls will feel most vulnerable or stressed.

 

For owl species that nest in shorter trees/shrubs (i.e., willows) and/or in smaller thickets of vegetation surrounded by open country, they have less room to hide and are more likely to flush when approached by a human or predator.  If they do flush, I imagine it's likely much more stressful than for a forest owl flushing from one tree to the next.  Importantly, flushing can expose them to diurnal predators, including ravens.  Even if they aren't being flushed each time, for owls are nesting in a popular birding area there's potential for repeated visits (by different birders or the same person/people returning to a favorite birding site) to cause a much higher cumulative stress load than a site than only receives an occasional visitor - and this could lead to a failed or abandoned nesting attempt.

 

I say all this to suggest that people be careful/deliberate in approaching known or suspected nesting sites.  Any isolated clumps of willows or other shrubs/trees could be suitable nesting habitat.  I'm including a couple pictures that Heidi has from fieldwork around the state that show potential nesting habitat.  And, for fun, a picture of a fledgling Saw-whet I found during some surveys many years ago in a riparian draw many miles away from conifer forest (this was June and after fledging so a less stressful time for this bird & its parents - but I still backed away quickly to keep it from flushing). 

If you do see an owl, please keep your distance.  After all, we all care about birds and know that they have many additional stressors in this modern world.  And, what's more important?  A better look at or photo of an owl or birds being able to nest in peace without too much disturbance/too many approaches?

 

Thanks for your time and please feel free to pass this on!


Jay

-- 
Cliff and Lisa Weisse
Island Park, Idaho
cliffandlisa@...


a reminder about owl nesting season and giving owls space

Jay Carlisle
 

Lots of you know this already but this is an especially sensitive time of year for nesting owls.  With all bird species I'm familiar with (i.e., I've studied their nesting ecology and/or read scientific literature), they are much more likely to abandon a nesting attempt early in the nesting cycle - i.e., during courtship, nest-building, and early incubation.  And, since many owls begin nesting quite early (as early as January for Great Horned and a month or 2 later for some others), the next couple months are the time when most owls will feel most vulnerable or stressed.

 

For owl species that nest in shorter trees/shrubs (i.e., willows) and/or in smaller thickets of vegetation surrounded by open country, they have less room to hide and are more likely to flush when approached by a human or predator.  If they do flush, I imagine it's likely much more stressful than for a forest owl flushing from one tree to the next.  Importantly, flushing can expose them to diurnal predators, including ravens.  Even if they aren't being flushed each time, for owls are nesting in a popular birding area there's potential for repeated visits (by different birders or the same person/people returning to a favorite birding site) to cause a much higher cumulative stress load than a site than only receives an occasional visitor - and this could lead to a failed or abandoned nesting attempt.

 

I say all this to suggest that people be careful/deliberate in approaching known or suspected nesting sites.  Any isolated clumps of willows or other shrubs/trees could be suitable nesting habitat.  I'm including a couple pictures that Heidi has from fieldwork around the state that show potential nesting habitat.  And, for fun, a picture of a fledgling Saw-whet I found during some surveys many years ago in a riparian draw many miles away from conifer forest (this was June and after fledging so a less stressful time for this bird & its parents - but I still backed away quickly to keep it from flushing). 

If you do see an owl, please keep your distance.  After all, we all care about birds and know that they have many additional stressors in this modern world.  And, what's more important?  A better look at or photo of an owl or birds being able to nest in peace without too much disturbance/too many approaches?

 

Thanks for your time and please feel free to pass this on!


Jay


Lost and found in Montour WMA

Elizabeth Medes
 

Saw flock of common redpolls land near the WMA campground yesterday - first sighting for me.  Dang, they're cute.  

Did any birder lose a nice cabled wool hat near the intersection of Montour and Main last week?  Looks brand new.  Happy to return it to you.

Liz Medes
Emmett ID


Re: Owl in fireplace

Kathleen Lopez
 

I've had an Orange-crowned Warbler in my backyard for the past several weeks and she has been to all my feeders including the suet.

Kathy Lopez
Nampa


On Fri, Feb 12, 2021, 8:10 AM cheryl huizinga <bchuizinga@...> wrote:
Larry, I checked out your eBird checklist and saw the Orange-crowned warbler mentioned coming to your suet feeder. I’ve been putting/smearing Bark Butter on bark of a tree in our yard. This morning I noticed an Orange-crowned warbler pecking at it along with juncos. They need/like that fat! 
Cheryl Huizinga
Caldwell, Idaho

On Feb 12, 2021, at 7:34 AM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:

Looks like a Barred Owl

On Feb 12, 2021, at 7:27 AM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


Gmorning !!

1st, can you ID this owl?  location is MA
2nd, it's not the first occurrence of this type of thing, eh?
3rd, so many easy ways to prevent this 

a couple inches of wet sloppy snow here this morning in west Boise, so I did our WinCo grocery shopping at 0430 hrs, before traffic wakes up, my usual jumpstart time anyway
as this bit of weather began, we had an insane rush of bird activity at our feeders yesterday afternoon

Good boid'n !!!

Larry and Missy



From: "Missy Arnold" <missydot410@...>
To: "Larry Arnold" <larnold47@...>
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 6:52:53 AM
Subject: Owl in fireplace

May be an image of indoor


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


--
Kathy Lopez
Nampa


Re: Owl in fireplace

cheryl huizinga
 

Larry, I checked out your eBird checklist and saw the Orange-crowned warbler mentioned coming to your suet feeder. I’ve been putting/smearing Bark Butter on bark of a tree in our yard. This morning I noticed an Orange-crowned warbler pecking at it along with juncos. They need/like that fat! 
Cheryl Huizinga
Caldwell, Idaho

On Feb 12, 2021, at 7:34 AM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

Looks like a Barred Owl

On Feb 12, 2021, at 7:27 AM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


Gmorning !!

1st, can you ID this owl?  location is MA
2nd, it's not the first occurrence of this type of thing, eh?
3rd, so many easy ways to prevent this 

a couple inches of wet sloppy snow here this morning in west Boise, so I did our WinCo grocery shopping at 0430 hrs, before traffic wakes up, my usual jumpstart time anyway
as this bit of weather began, we had an insane rush of bird activity at our feeders yesterday afternoon

Good boid'n !!!

Larry and Missy



From: "Missy Arnold" <missydot410@...>
To: "Larry Arnold" <larnold47@...>
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 6:52:53 AM
Subject: Owl in fireplace

May be an image of indoor


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Re: Owl in fireplace

Ken Miracle
 

Looks like a Barred Owl

On Feb 12, 2021, at 7:27 AM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


Gmorning !!

1st, can you ID this owl?  location is MA
2nd, it's not the first occurrence of this type of thing, eh?
3rd, so many easy ways to prevent this 

a couple inches of wet sloppy snow here this morning in west Boise, so I did our WinCo grocery shopping at 0430 hrs, before traffic wakes up, my usual jumpstart time anyway
as this bit of weather began, we had an insane rush of bird activity at our feeders yesterday afternoon

Good boid'n !!!

Larry and Missy



From: "Missy Arnold" <missydot410@...>
To: "Larry Arnold" <larnold47@...>
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 6:52:53 AM
Subject: Owl in fireplace

May be an image of indoor


Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Owl in fireplace

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


Gmorning !!

1st, can you ID this owl?  location is MA
2nd, it's not the first occurrence of this type of thing, eh?
3rd, so many easy ways to prevent this 

a couple inches of wet sloppy snow here this morning in west Boise, so I did our WinCo grocery shopping at 0430 hrs, before traffic wakes up, my usual jumpstart time anyway
as this bit of weather began, we had an insane rush of bird activity at our feeders yesterday afternoon
ebird list here -    https://ebird.org/checklist/S80837721

Good boid'n !!!

Larry and Missy



From: "Missy Arnold" <missydot410@...>
To: "Larry Arnold" <larnold47@...>
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 6:52:53 AM
Subject: Owl in fireplace

May be an image of indoor


Re: Snow Buntings

lcarrigan_55
 

Arrrgh! Spell check. Meant.. Didn't see any Longspurs...


Snow Buntings

lcarrigan_55
 

No guarantees for re-locating, if one takes a drive to find, but have seen sev large groups of Snow Buntings in past wk. One group of about 30 was just north of Challis on Hwy 93, west side of road. And, yest 3 good-sized groups on Hwy 26 between Arco & Craters. One group had at least 100 birds. The groups have been "flighty" &, unlike Horned Larks, not keen on returning immediately to roadside, often setting down 50 yds + off hwy & then just, taking off. All have been in fields with open expanses of snow coverage. Didn't see any Larkspurs, wind was brutal & difficult to stay focused on any one bird. Wouldn't surprise me if some were present though. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: Load

Vernon Tunnell <tunnellv62@...>
 

Sorry wrong group 

On Sat, Feb 6, 2021 at 5:45 AM Vernon Tunnell via groups.io <tunnellv62=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Leaving LaGrange
Vern 1730

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