Date   

Re: Barred Owl in Boise (Ann Morrison park)

Jay Carlisle
 

Sorry for the slow reply (& happy thanksgiving ūü¶É).

Hard to say if more are breeding close by then a decade ago but this species is known to have undergone a MAJOR range expansion over the last 50+ years.  More details in the conservation blurb in the life history section on the All About Birds site (Barred Owl Life History, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology) but their #s have almost certainly grown in Idaho in recent decades, & breeders have probably moved further south - making it easier for dispersing birds to reach us in winter.







On Tuesday, November 24, 2020, 6:13 PM, Ken Miracle via groups.io <chukar28@...> wrote:

Barred seem to be popping up all over the city in the last couple of years. Last year at Heron Cove off Park Center, at Shakespeare and at Barber Park and I heard also Hulls Gulch. What do you think Jay are they breeding close by now or just more of them migrating in for the winter?

On Nov 24, 2020, at 6:01 PM, Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay@...> wrote:

I had a walking (& socially-distanced) meeting this afternoon in the park and while chatting back at the cars @ 459pm, I noticed a Barred Owl fly in and land on a pine over the fence separating the park (along Ann Morrison Park drive not far past the speed bump/dip) from apartments to the N.

I snapped a ‚Äúproof‚ÄĚ pic from my cell phone - very zoomed in as we stayed far away.

<IMG_5689.jpeg>

We’re lucky to get some cool owls visit in winter - as usual, I’ll ask people to keep their distance so we can minimize disturbance.  Even if the bird doesn’t exhibit obvious signs of stress, our presence can be & usually is stressful - especially if we get & stay close.  In fact, studies have shown that the many passers-by (frisbee golf, etc.) are usually much less disturbing than a birdwatcher or photographer standing still with lenses trained on the bird.

Thanks!¬† & hopefully this bird will linger for a while ūü§ěūü§ě

Jay




<IMG_5689.jpeg>

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Re: Happy Meleagris gallopavo domesticus !!!

R L ROWLAND RONALD ROWLAND
 

Thank you. And a Merry Happy Thanksgiving to you both and all who are yours.
CGB. RL 

----- Original Message -----
From: Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
To: IBLE <IBLE@groups.io>
Cc: garyhworthington <garyhworthington@...>
Sent: Thu, 26 Nov 2020 09:31:53 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [IBLE] Happy Meleagris gallopavo domesticus !!!


Larry and Missy
W Boise 

=)





Happy Meleagris gallopavo domesticus !!!

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


Larry and Missy
W Boise 

=)



during the pandemic - Newfoundland's 1st BBA begins

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


and other news from the north.....


From: "Birds Canada" <birdscanada@...>
To: "Larry Arnold" <larnold47@...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 10:31:15 AM
Subject: Your latest bird research and conservation news

Learn more about Canada's wild birds

Black-capped Chickadee Photo: Ted Gough  

Give the gift of conservation

Looking for meaningful gifts that make a positive impact? We‚Äôve got suggestions for the coffee-drinker, crafter¬†‚Ästand of course, the bird-lover ‚Äď on your list! They‚Äôll love the gift, and feel great knowing that it‚Äôs helping birds. See our holiday gift guide.

 

 Photo: Catherine Dale  

Citizen Scientists ‚Äúrock‚ÄĚ the first year of the Newfoundland Atlas

In spite of the pandemic, Newfoundland’s first Breeding Bird Atlas got off to a safe and productive start this year. Thank you, volunteers! The Atlas coordinators have highlights to share, including some cool bird observations. Check out their summary.

 

Forge future guardians for nature this Giving Tuesday

This Giving Tuesday your gift to our education program will connect kids with birds and science in their schoolyard and neighbourhood, as they trade in their devices for binoculars and tap into their natural curiosity for the wild world. Make your special Giving Tuesday donation now.

 

Sprague’s Pipit Photo: Yousif Attia  

A Grassland Conservation Incentives Guide to benefit birds and ranchers

Grassland birds have declined steeply since the 1970s, but ranchers in the Prairies can protect what remains of their habitat. Birds Canada has produced a simple guide listing all incentives available to conserve, enhance, or restore grasslands ‚Äď for nature and people. Learn more.

 

 Photo: Amanda Bichel  

Identifying Canada’s Key Biodiversity Areas to help set conservation priorities

Key Biodiversity Areas are the most important places in the world for species and their habitats. Birds Canada and partners are working to identify sites in Canada that qualify ‚Äď a promising step towards their protection. Get the details.

 Western Sandpipers Photo: Pete Davidson  

Hemisphere-wide collaboration to further understanding of migratory shorebird declines

Shorebirds connect people and places, covering amazingly vast distances on migration! Their wayfaring ways make it hard to figure out why shorebirds are declining, but the Migratory Shorebird Project is using an innovative approach. See how it’s tackling the challenge.

Featured Video

Wishing you knew more about the birds that come to your feeder? Watch a beginner feeder bird ID workshop featuring tips from Kerrie Wilcox (Canadian Leader for Project FeederWatch) and Andrés Jiménez (Urban Program Coordinator) from Birds Canada.

 

Events & Opportunities

Birds Canada winter birds photo contest. Winter provides a great opportunity to experience and photograph birds! Take part in our bird photo contest from December 1, 2020 to January 31, 2021 for your chance to win prizes: bird-friendly coffee, a suet bird feeder, and a subscription to BirdWatch Canada. See contest details.

A fond farewell to our President. Birds Canada’s President, Steven Price, will be retiring in May 2021. Since 2014, Steven’s leadership has helped us grow into the organization we need to be for birds in the years to come. The search for a new President is underway. Learn more.

Gift idea: bird photo calendar. Special offer for the first 100 people to respond! Our beautiful Birds Canada calendars featuring photos from our members are available to purchase for $20 this holiday season. Each of the lucky 100 respondents can order up to three calendars. Click here to place your order.

Latest Research Publications 

Barlow, N.L., Kirol, C.P., Fedy, B.C. 2020. Avian community response to landscape-scale habitat reclamation. Biological Conservation.

González, A.M., Bayly, N.J., Hobson, K.A. 2020. Earlier and slower or later and faster: Spring migration pace linked to departure time in a Neotropical migrant songbird. Journal of Animal Ecology.

Hipfner, M.J., Prill, M.M., Studholme, K.R., et al. 2020. Geolocator tagging links distributions in the non-breeding season to population genetic structure in a sentinel North Pacific seabird. PLOS ONE.

supporter


Photo

Robert Kiernan
 

Seems the photo of wigeon  did not load


Lake lowell nampa area

Robert Kiernan
 

Lower dam 4:pm here I go with birds to me seem odd color for a wigeon also saw horn grebe common goldeneye beaver lodge had kingfishers & phoebe& a close look at ruddy swimming away seemed to be using its tail as a rudder mayhaps why called ruddy also on steps ca.gull


Re: Barred Owl in Boise (Ann Morrison park)

Ken Miracle
 

Barred seem to be popping up all over the city in the last couple of years. Last year at Heron Cove off Park Center, at Shakespeare and at Barber Park and I heard also Hulls Gulch. What do you think Jay are they breeding close by now or just more of them migrating in for the winter?

On Nov 24, 2020, at 6:01 PM, Jay Carlisle via groups.io <carlislejay@...> wrote:

I had a walking (& socially-distanced) meeting this afternoon in the park and while chatting back at the cars @ 459pm, I noticed a Barred Owl fly in and land on a pine over the fence separating the park (along Ann Morrison Park drive not far past the speed bump/dip) from apartments to the N.

I snapped a ‚Äúproof‚ÄĚ pic from my cell phone - very zoomed in as we stayed far away.

<IMG_5689.jpeg>

We’re lucky to get some cool owls visit in winter - as usual, I’ll ask people to keep their distance so we can minimize disturbance.  Even if the bird doesn’t exhibit obvious signs of stress, our presence can be & usually is stressful - especially if we get & stay close.  In fact, studies have shown that the many passers-by (frisbee golf, etc.) are usually much less disturbing than a birdwatcher or photographer standing still with lenses trained on the bird.

Thanks!¬† & hopefully this bird will linger for a while ūü§ěūü§ě

Jay



<IMG_5689.jpeg>

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Barred Owl in Boise (Ann Morrison park)

Jay Carlisle
 

I had a walking (& socially-distanced) meeting this afternoon in the park and while chatting back at the cars @ 459pm, I noticed a Barred Owl fly in and land on a pine over the fence separating the park (along Ann Morrison Park drive not far past the speed bump/dip) from apartments to the N.

I snapped a ‚Äúproof‚ÄĚ pic from my cell phone - very zoomed in as we stayed far away.

Inline image

We’re lucky to get some cool owls visit in winter - as usual, I’ll ask people to keep their distance so we can minimize disturbance.  Even if the bird doesn’t exhibit obvious signs of stress, our presence can be & usually is stressful - especially if we get & stay close.  In fact, studies have shown that the many passers-by (frisbee golf, etc.) are usually much less disturbing than a birdwatcher or photographer standing still with lenses trained on the bird.

Thanks!¬† & hopefully this bird will linger for a while ūü§ěūü§ě

Jay




Sparrow

Robert Kiernan
 

I knew it was a immature sparrow the dark olive above the tail was puzzling  looking at sibley's app it looks like a 1st winter tiaga/interior west wh.crown 


On Sun, Nov 22, 2020, 9:06 PM Robert Kiernan via groups.io <photobirder=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Kind of different for a white crown 


Re: Harris's Sparrow

Jon Barnett
 

Nice!  I grew up in that vicinity.  Thank you for letting us know!  Best, Jonathan, Horseshoe Bend 


On Nov 23, 2020, at 2:59 PM, Nick Miller via groups.io <siminovac@...> wrote:

ÔĽŅI've had a juvenile Harris's Sparrow in my backyard and along the canal that borders it today. It's among a large flock of Juncos. From the corner of Wheeler and Alpine, walk north across the tracks and then scan along the canal. My yard has a large blue shed in back; the bird has been between my fence and the canal, off and on today.

Nick Miller
Depot Bench/Boise


Harris's Sparrow

Nick Miller
 

I've had a juvenile Harris's Sparrow in my backyard and along the canal that borders it today. It's among a large flock of Juncos. From the corner of Wheeler and Alpine, walk north across the tracks and then scan along the canal. My yard has a large blue shed in back; the bird has been between my fence and the canal, off and on today.

Nick Miller
Depot Bench/Boise


Re: Odd color

Louisa Evers
 

Just an immature white-crown

--
Louisa Evers
elouisa603@...


Winter Raptor Survey Project

Jeff Fleischer
 

HI Everybody,

I have made postings to IBLE in the past regarding availability of  raptor survey routes for the Winter Raptor Survey Project, a very extensive citizen science project sponsored by the East Cascades Audubon Society based in Bend, OR.  This is our 17th survey season and we now have over 450 routes that are surveyed throughout OR, ID, WA, and a small part of northern CA and northeastern UT.

As a review, we ask that project volunteers commit to once a month surveys for December through February.  These surveys can be done on a day that fits your monthly life schedule.  You would need to have at least a pair of binoculars to view distant birds and if you have a spotting scope even better but not required. You should also have a good working ID knowledge of the more common species of raptors that frequent your area.

The following routes are still available if you have the desire to survey birds of prey for us this winter:

DeSmet - Tensed                     72 miles
Churchill - Oakley                    68 miles
Rupert North                            69 miles
Rupert East - Minidoka            55 miles
Burley SW                               54 miles
Burley SE                                31 miles
Paul                                        65 miles
Minidoka NW                          68 miles
American Falls SW                 44 miles
American Falls - Rockland     78 miles

If you live near one of these areas and are interested in joining this project, please email me as soon as you can as this will be the last advertisement of these routes for this winter.  I will be happy to hear from you and more than happy to get you prepared for the survey work that you will be doing :).  This is a great way to get out during the doldrum winter months and do some raptor watching, hope to hear from you soon, thanks! :)

Jeff Fleischer
Project Coordinator
Winter Raptor Survey Project
East Cascades Audubon Society


Odd color

Robert Kiernan
 

Kind of different for a white crown 


Re: Warning gruesome bird pic

rattlesnake4873
 

The food chain, food pyramid. As a zoologist and former biology teacher, this is neither cruel nor gross. It's as Bob Dylan wrote, "It's alright Ma, it's life and life only."



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy Tablet

-------- Original message --------
From: Richard and Ann Rusnak <rarusnak62@...>
Date: 11/22/20 2:39 PM (GMT-07:00)
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: [IBLE] Warning gruesome bird pic

I followed a raptor attack print in the snow > 100 yards, down a fairly steep slope, this was >¬ľ mile from Cascade reservoir in the hilly forest mind you. I Started seeing feathers and tiny specs of blood. See pics for my find. Cheers Rich Rusnak






Re: Warning gruesome bird pic

Kevin Merrell
 

The natural world revealed. A raptor gained the strength to continue on. Thanks for sharing.

Kevin

On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 2:49 PM Richard and Ann Rusnak <rarusnak62@...> wrote:
I followed a raptor attack print in the snow > 100 yards, down a fairly steep slope, this was >¬ľ mile from Cascade reservoir in the hilly forest mind you. I Started seeing feathers and tiny specs of blood. See pics for my find. Cheers Rich Rusnak






Warning gruesome bird pic

Richard and Ann Rusnak
 

I followed a raptor attack print in the snow > 100 yards, down a fairly steep slope, this was >¬ľ mile from Cascade reservoir in the hilly forest mind you. I Started seeing feathers and tiny specs of blood. See pics for my find. Cheers Rich Rusnak


Re: Wigeon Hybrid

bike4birds
 

I didn’t know that there was a possibility of hanky-panky between Wigeons and Teal! I agree the head looks like a Teal, but I just assumed it was an American/Eurasian hybrid like the picture in Sibley. And great photos.

Also, you found some birds there that I apparently just blew by.

Tom

 

From: IBLE@groups.io [mailto:IBLE@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jason Talbot via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, November 21, 2020 5:15 PM
To: IBLE@groups.io
Subject: [IBLE] Wigeon Hybrid

 

Tom, I got a photo of your wigeon hybrid!  https://ebird.org/checklist/S76507799

Shared via the Google app

 


Re: Any News on the Common Crane for 11/21?

Kit Struthers
 

Two friends and I from Idaho Falls drove all around and looked for hours with no luck. We birded and talked with nine other birders who also had no luck.

Brad Hammond, previously of Idaho Falls and now from Wilder, found four immature Snow Geese and a flock of Snow Buntings for us.

Kit

Kit Struthers
Idaho Falls, ID
kit619@centurylink.net


Hawk

Robert Kiernan
 

This was seen along road rd.to outlet canal lake lowell w.of nampa juvenile with eye brow could be goshawk or ?

701 - 720 of 33704