Date   

Re: Sighting of wing-tagged Red-tailed Hawk at Lake Lowell, Canyon County, Idaho

Jeff Fleischer
 

Hi Larry,

Should mention that in the past the lady that assists in this PDX operation, who also does a route for us, has used our project data to see where the best fit would be for the release of these hawks that they collect at PDX.  This makes two birds now that have been released at sites in NE OR that have had subsequent sightings, this is a great project not only to study bird movement but to keep our airports safe from bird collisions ! :)

Jeff

On Nov 3, 2020, at 2:20 PM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


my words precisely   =)


From: "Denise Hughes" <deniseh449@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 3, 2020 2:31:55 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Sighting of wing-tagged Red-tailed Hawk at Lake Lowell, Canyon County, Idaho

Very cool!

Denise Hughes
Caldwell, Idaho

On Nov 3, 2020, at 2:30 PM, cheryl huizinga <bchuizinga@...> wrote:


Hi Birders,
On October 19 At SW end of Lake Lowell Lower Dam in Canyon County, I saw and photographed a Red-tailed Hawk in a tree that had a large red tag on its wing.  After asking a couple of raptor friends, I was told to check with www.pdxraptors.com about the bird.  I sent in the photos of the red tag with  KZ letters on its wing. I got an answer back and here it is. Fun to know about this hawk and hope I see more hawks with a red tag.  If you find one, check out the website and let them know.  
Cheryl Huizinga, Caldwell, ID

 

“Thank you for submitting a sighting and photo of K/Z via www.pdxraptors.com! This red-tailed hawk was first captured at Portland International Airport earlier this year in July. This bird is a hatch year and was the offspring of a pair of resident hawks that nest near the airport. After being fitted with wing-tags and a leg band it was released in Halfway, OR. Your sighting is the first we’ve received since it was released and we’re glad to hear that it is still alive and well. 
Once again, thank you for your report. We truly appreciate your participation and with the help of individuals such as you, we are able to determine the most successful release sites. This in turn helps to reduce the number of birds returning to PDX and contributes to a safer airfield for both humans and birds.
We look forward to any future reports of your wing-tagged hawk sightings!”

 

Regards,
Erick Shore
Aviation Wildlife Technician
Port of Portland

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

<RTHA with wing tag - 2 .jpg>
<RTHA with wing tag - Lake Lowell 10-19-2020.jpg>



Re: Sighting of wing-tagged Red-tailed Hawk at Lake Lowell, Canyon County, Idaho

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


my words precisely   =)


From: "Denise Hughes" <deniseh449@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 3, 2020 2:31:55 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Sighting of wing-tagged Red-tailed Hawk at Lake Lowell, Canyon County, Idaho

Very cool!

Denise Hughes
Caldwell, Idaho

On Nov 3, 2020, at 2:30 PM, cheryl huizinga <bchuizinga@...> wrote:



Hi Birders,

On October 19 At SW end of Lake Lowell Lower Dam in Canyon County, I saw and photographed a Red-tailed Hawk in a tree that had a large red tag on its wing.  After asking a couple of raptor friends, I was told to check with www.pdxraptors.com about the bird.  I sent in the photos of the red tag with  KZ letters on its wing. I got an answer back and here it is. Fun to know about this hawk and hope I see more hawks with a red tag.  If you find one, check out the website and let them know. 

Cheryl Huizinga, Caldwell, ID

 

“Thank you for submitting a sighting and photo of K/Z via www.pdxraptors.com! This red-tailed hawk was first captured at Portland International Airport earlier this year in July. This bird is a hatch year and was the offspring of a pair of resident hawks that nest near the airport. After being fitted with wing-tags and a leg band it was released in Halfway, OR. Your sighting is the first we’ve received since it was released and we’re glad to hear that it is still alive and well.

Once again, thank you for your report. We truly appreciate your participation and with the help of individuals such as you, we are able to determine the most successful release sites. This in turn helps to reduce the number of birds returning to PDX and contributes to a safer airfield for both humans and birds.

We look forward to any future reports of your wing-tagged hawk sightings!”

 

Regards,

Erick Shore

Aviation Wildlife Technician

Port of Portland

erick.shore@...

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

<RTHA with wing tag - 2 .jpg>
<RTHA with wing tag - Lake Lowell 10-19-2020.jpg>


Re: Sighting of wing-tagged Red-tailed Hawk at Lake Lowell, Canyon County, Idaho

Denise Hughes
 

Very cool!

Denise Hughes
Caldwell, Idaho

On Nov 3, 2020, at 2:30 PM, cheryl huizinga <bchuizinga@...> wrote:



Hi Birders,

On October 19 At SW end of Lake Lowell Lower Dam in Canyon County, I saw and photographed a Red-tailed Hawk in a tree that had a large red tag on its wing.  After asking a couple of raptor friends, I was told to check with www.pdxraptors.com about the bird.  I sent in the photos of the red tag with  KZ letters on its wing. I got an answer back and here it is. Fun to know about this hawk and hope I see more hawks with a red tag.  If you find one, check out the website and let them know. 

Cheryl Huizinga, Caldwell, ID

 

“Thank you for submitting a sighting and photo of K/Z via www.pdxraptors.com! This red-tailed hawk was first captured at Portland International Airport earlier this year in July. This bird is a hatch year and was the offspring of a pair of resident hawks that nest near the airport. After being fitted with wing-tags and a leg band it was released in Halfway, OR. Your sighting is the first we’ve received since it was released and we’re glad to hear that it is still alive and well.

Once again, thank you for your report. We truly appreciate your participation and with the help of individuals such as you, we are able to determine the most successful release sites. This in turn helps to reduce the number of birds returning to PDX and contributes to a safer airfield for both humans and birds.

We look forward to any future reports of your wing-tagged hawk sightings!”

 

Regards,

Erick Shore

Aviation Wildlife Technician

Port of Portland

erick.shore@...

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

<RTHA with wing tag - 2 .jpg>
<RTHA with wing tag - Lake Lowell 10-19-2020.jpg>


Sighting of wing-tagged Red-tailed Hawk at Lake Lowell, Canyon County, Idaho

cheryl huizinga
 

Hi Birders,

On October 19 At SW end of Lake Lowell Lower Dam in Canyon County, I saw and photographed a Red-tailed Hawk in a tree that had a large red tag on its wing.  After asking a couple of raptor friends, I was told to check with www.pdxraptors.com about the bird.  I sent in the photos of the red tag with  KZ letters on its wing. I got an answer back and here it is. Fun to know about this hawk and hope I see more hawks with a red tag.  If you find one, check out the website and let them know. 

Cheryl Huizinga, Caldwell, ID

 

“Thank you for submitting a sighting and photo of K/Z via www.pdxraptors.com! This red-tailed hawk was first captured at Portland International Airport earlier this year in July. This bird is a hatch year and was the offspring of a pair of resident hawks that nest near the airport. After being fitted with wing-tags and a leg band it was released in Halfway, OR. Your sighting is the first we’ve received since it was released and we’re glad to hear that it is still alive and well.

Once again, thank you for your report. We truly appreciate your participation and with the help of individuals such as you, we are able to determine the most successful release sites. This in turn helps to reduce the number of birds returning to PDX and contributes to a safer airfield for both humans and birds.

We look forward to any future reports of your wing-tagged hawk sightings!”

 

Regards,

Erick Shore

Aviation Wildlife Technician

Port of Portland

erick.shore@...

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Swans are game birds now??

bob perata
 

On Monday, November 2, 2020, 2:21 PM, bob perata via groups.io <bobperata@...> wrote:

Maybe I’m late on this that swans have become game birds in North Idaho.  


BOB Perata
Boise, Idaho


Swans are game birds now??

bob perata
 

Maybe I’m late on this that swans have become game birds in North Idaho.  


BOB Perata
Boise, Idaho


Re: Birding

Diann Stone
 

Larry,

Your closing comment on chocolate gave me a good chuckle! Thanks for that.

Dianne Stone Boise Depot Bench

On Sat, Oct 31, 2020, 2:11 PM Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:

hey Bob, I'm still laughing at this...  " ALL GREBES BUT LEAST "
Good One, and Totally Nice Haul !!!
I think yours are possibly the shortest / most loaded / postings on IBLE ?

I had 60 sp of birds yesterday along BRG (Boise River Greenbelt), but that involved two trips out on my bike, dawn and mid-day  
But the 2nd trip out was with Missy and HER EARS !!!!!!
I'm crazy to bird without her, problem being I HAVE TO head out in the Early Hours (in the Dark) (before she's ready to climb onto her bike) for owls and other "night-callers" and to avoid sun in my eyes and to avoid an over-crowded greenbelt, and going early usually nets me some interesting mammals, yesterday's was a vole who did NOT want to share the path

eh?

I could give up chocolate, but I'm no quitter   ;-)
especially on Halloween

Larry



From: "Robert Kiernan" <photobirder@...>
To: "IBLE" <ible@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 2:26:31 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Birding

L.L.LOWER DAM  9:15 ALL GREBES BUT LEAST RED BREASTED MERGANSERS  4 dunlins  on steps  outlet canal lesser yellow legs.  Dry lakes I guess things are winding down  5 kildare  [ LIKE ] 1lonely dunlin


Re: Birding

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


hey Bob, I'm still laughing at this...  " ALL GREBES BUT LEAST "
Good One, and Totally Nice Haul !!!
I think yours are possibly the shortest / most loaded / postings on IBLE ?

I had 60 sp of birds yesterday along BRG (Boise River Greenbelt), but that involved two trips out on my bike, dawn and mid-day  
But the 2nd trip out was with Missy and HER EARS !!!!!!
I'm crazy to bird without her, problem being I HAVE TO head out in the Early Hours (in the Dark) (before she's ready to climb onto her bike) for owls and other "night-callers" and to avoid sun in my eyes and to avoid an over-crowded greenbelt, and going early usually nets me some interesting mammals, yesterday's was a vole who did NOT want to share the path

eh?

I could give up chocolate, but I'm no quitter   ;-)
especially on Halloween

Larry



From: "Robert Kiernan" <photobirder@...>
To: "IBLE" <ible@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 2:26:31 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Birding

L.L.LOWER DAM  9:15 ALL GREBES BUT LEAST RED BREASTED MERGANSERS  4 dunlins  on steps  outlet canal lesser yellow legs.  Dry lakes I guess things are winding down  5 kildare  [ LIKE ] 1lonely dunlin


Blue Jay

Kit Struthers
 

Our side my kitchen window just now.

Kit

Kit Struthers
Idaho Falls, ID
kit619@centurylink.net


[eBird Alert] Ada County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 

Gmorning crazy birders !! ;-)

THIS Sage Thrasher reminds me of a few late-season birds I had in CO and NM 1995-2013...

Sage Thrasher in Dec
Green-tailed Towhee in Dec
Bullock's Oriole on rabbitbrush covered with snow, Dec
Rufous and Black-chinned hummingbirds *failing* at level flight when snow was falling in Albuquerque.... they kept drifting downward to the ground with the gently falling snowflakes, actually quite funny to watch this, like they needed a software update for this situation ???

I've had other late sightings I'm sure, but these are most memorable

Larry
W Boise Greenbelt



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "ebird-alert" <ebird-alert@cornell.edu>
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 11:45:14 PM
Subject: [eBird Alert] Ada County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

*** Species Summary:

- Blue Jay (1 report)
- Sage Thrasher (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Ada County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Ada County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36228
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Oct 28, 2020 17:00 by Scott Tuthill
- Tuthill's in the Highlands (ID), Ada, Idaho
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.6533191,-116.1753393&ll=43.6533191,-116.1753393
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S75554756
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "See photos"

Sage Thrasher (Oreoscoptes montanus) (1)
- Reported Oct 29, 2020 09:49 by Ron Riley
- Indian Creek Reservoir, Ada, Idaho
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.3878656,-116.0129213&ll=43.3878656,-116.0129213
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S75563294
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Thrasher, shortish bill, long tail, brown mottled on white chest, yellow eye, slight eye ring. Perched in sage... photo."

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Ada County Rare Bird Alert

Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
https://ebird.org/alerts

eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


Birding

Robert Kiernan
 

L.L.LOWER DAM  9:15 ALL GREBES BUT LEAST RED BREASTED MERGANSERS  4 dunlins  on steps  outlet canal lesser yellow legs.  Dry lakes I guess things are winding down  5 kildare  1lonely dunlin


Re: so, everyone (like us) has one of these beasties terrorizing their feeders ?

Elizabeth Medes
 

Definitely, Jeff.  And hopefully with the first November survey, and deciduous trees bare, we'll be able to see him.  

Liz

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 9:31 AM Jeff Fleischer via groups.io <raptorrunner97321=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Liz,

You are on the route path right?  This marauder should be counted if he shows in November :)

Jeff

On Oct 28, 2020, at 8:11 AM, Elizabeth Medes <liz.medes@...> wrote:

Oh Larry, the tales we could tell.  At the risk of repeating myself in this group, there's a Cooper stalking our backyard at dusk.  The first sound we hear is the quail alarm, followed by a flurry of small feathered things scattering, a terrific view of the Coop zooming in and snatching, then silence.  It is an Oscar performance.  Who needs TV?

Liz
Emmett ID


Re: so, everyone (like us) has one of these beasties terrorizing their feeders ?

Jeff Fleischer
 

Hi Liz,

You are on the route path right?  This marauder should be counted if he shows in November :)

Jeff

On Oct 28, 2020, at 8:11 AM, Elizabeth Medes <liz.medes@...> wrote:

Oh Larry, the tales we could tell.  At the risk of repeating myself in this group, there's a Cooper stalking our backyard at dusk.  The first sound we hear is the quail alarm, followed by a flurry of small feathered things scattering, a terrific view of the Coop zooming in and snatching, then silence.  It is an Oscar performance.  Who needs TV?

Liz
Emmett ID


Re: World Famous RL

Ken Miracle
 

Cool RL got to make the trip and get immortalized along with duck … we almost took off to Lewiston Yesterday but we had to much going on with deadlines … yeah I have those even in retirement:-) We went out to the Hubbard Recreation Area and the small reservoir was packed with waterfowl. Trumpeter and Tundra Swans and lot’s of ducks including one that Ben Pierce had to ID for me. A Mallard Hen with a hormone imbalance. I also had a lens to camera hiccup that took me a while to fix and the birds were a long ways out but stayed up to 3 AM going through hundreds of waterfowl to get things identified.




On Oct 28, 2020, at 8:14 AM, kas dumroese <kas.birder@...> wrote:

Yesterday's issue of the Lewiston Tribune, front page no less, featured RL Rowland viewing the American Black Duck. 

Kas Dumroese
Moscow

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


Re: so, everyone (like us) has one of these beasties terrorizing their feeders ?

Elizabeth Medes
 

Oh Larry, the tales we could tell.  At the risk of repeating myself in this group, there's a Cooper stalking our backyard at dusk.  The first sound we hear is the quail alarm, followed by a flurry of small feathered things scattering, a terrific view of the Coop zooming in and snatching, then silence.  It is an Oscar performance.  Who needs TV?

Liz
Emmett ID


so, everyone (like us) has one of these beasties terrorizing their feeders ?

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/272817721?__hstc=60209138.b14a01ecbcc0ad97adda7baab951527d.1596206429000.1603885043563.1603894588247.110&__hssc=60209138.1.1603894588247&__hsfp=776849340

such drama....!!



Re: World Famous RL

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


way cool   =)


From: "kas dumroese" <kas.birder@...>
To: "IBLE" <ible@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 8:14:42 AM
Subject: [IBLE] World Famous RL

Yesterday's issue of the Lewiston Tribune, front page no less, featured RL Rowland viewing the American Black Duck. 

Kas Dumroese
Moscow


World Famous RL

kas dumroese
 

Yesterday's issue of the Lewiston Tribune, front page no less, featured RL Rowland viewing the American Black Duck. 

Kas Dumroese
Moscow


Re: An interesting day for yard birds!

rattlesnake4873
 

I recall an afternoon on the John Muir trail in the early 70s or late 60s when we had all three western nuthatches and a brown creeper in the same tree simultaneously. That was a pretty cool rest stop on the way to Silver Pass. 

Dean Jones

“Bird is a verb.”

On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 3:31 PM Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


Scott, what a remarkable "parade" through your yard, for *any* yard around here (Treasure Valley).....  including a WCSP sub-species “bullyae”   =)  
Your "where am I?" quiz would be a good one......

I thought of doing a similar thing when our Lawrence's Goldfinch / LAGO / showed up in Grand Junction CO, at the same time we had LEGO, AMGO, and PISI at our thistle feeders...... not sure why, but our LAGO attracted birders from the east coast, west coast, gulf coast, yada yada, for two months....  but I'll add that it was a very regular visitor to our thistle and was following a female LEGO around ("following flights") and doing some rapid billing (“mandibulation") with her, as in mating behaviors, resulting in thousands of photos being taken, and two stenos filled with observational notes by visiting birders.  As well as a paper published in the Colorado Field Ornithologists Quarterly.

Not sure if anyone remembers my wren quiz from a few years ago, when me and a birding buddy found all of the North American wrens in one day without driving very far.  The reason we did that was because one of our first birds of the day in our campground was a Sedge Wren, so off we went to find the others, but that involved *both* being in the right part of the country (S Texas) and the right season (winter-ish) and t’was before Pacific Wren was peeled off from Winter Wren. 

 

BTW, when I first got fascinated by hummingbirds, I went directly home from work every day for years and headed straight into our back yard in Albuquerque, where our hum-feeders were concentrated, and I took notes~notes~notes, filling a 2" binder each year with *just* hummingbird observations because I was well beyond any hope for help from a psychiatrist, hahaha

 

Thx again Scott for notes on your observations, because it unlocked some of my own deeply buried memories/experiences   =)

 

Larry,

West Boise Greenbelt 

 

Birds Rock !!!

 




From: "Scott Tuthill" <satuthill@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2020 7:50:20 PM
Subject: [IBLE] An interesting day for yard birds!

Nothing like the first cold snap of the year to stir up the bird life. It was a crazy and memorable day here at my place in the Boise Highlands area (Ada County). It’s worth a story so I thought I would share.

 

Right at first light the continuing ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD made it’s first of many visits today to my feeders today. I brought the feeders in overnight to keep them from freezing. Out they went a bit before dawn and the Anna’s was right there. Then looking down to the ground under my seed feeders I saw at least 10 Mourning Doves – likely a yard record. There were a similar number of Juncos, whose numbers have been building slowly over the past couple of weeks. White-crowned Sparrow number spiked back up this morning after declining from an initial peak a couple weeks ago. There was a dozen or so – 75% first winter birds. A couple of Song Sparrows were in the mix. Up on the thistle feeder were a couple Pine Siskins and a few Lesser Goldfinches. The sunflower feeder had its attendant House Finches and in the surrounding trees the resident Red-breasted Nuthatches and visiting Black-capped Chickadees where moving around. It was one happy family until a Cooper’s Hawk swooped in also looking for it’s morning meal. That scattered everyone. I had to wonder if the hawk was one of the family that nested across the street this year – which is another story to itself.

 

Later in the afternoon I looked back out in the yard to see most of the same had returned and were joined by some California Quail. It is fun too see them back in the yard after my usual flock being dispersed or consumed by the Cooper’s Hawk family. Over the past week I have noticed that one White-crowned Sparrow is particularly aggressive. Whenever it fly’s in it chases away whatever birds are where it wants to feed. It is definitely of the sub-species “bullyae”. It was in the feeding group today. And, at one point I watched it go over and grab the tail of one of the quail in its beak and shake away. I have never seen this before and just had to laugh. I had my camera with me but was not able to capture it on “film”. For its part, the quail seem surprised but after the sparrow let go, it just went on feeding with its friends.

 

This builds up to one of the best 15 minutes of birding in my yard, ever—and I have lived here 26 year. A little before 6PM I saw the ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD out feeding so I went outside with my camera to get some photos. As I looked down on the ground under the seed feeders there was a BLUE JAY. An all time new one for the yard. I have certainly been following the reports of them all over the state, but I was still shocked to see one in my yard. Unfortunately, I missed getting photos. As I looked around all of the birds from the morning were back, getting an evening meal before a cold night to come. I kept watch hoping the jay would come back but it didn’t. However, a Spotted Towhee came in. I have only a handful of prior yard records. As I kept watch I found the Anna’s perched in a maple tree just in front of me. I can’t wait to see how the photos turned out. A full frame Anna’s among the red and gold maple leaves. Just about then a flock of 20 American Robins flew by going one way and then a few Cedar Waxwings the other way. It was an amazing way to end the day.

 

I would love to create a quiz – “Where am I where I have an October 26 yard list with: Anna’s Hummingbird, Blue Jay, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Cedar Waxwings”. Or something like that.

 

 



Re: An interesting day for yard birds!

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


Scott, what a remarkable "parade" through your yard, for *any* yard around here (Treasure Valley).....  including a WCSP sub-species “bullyae”   =)  
Your "where am I?" quiz would be a good one......

I thought of doing a similar thing when our Lawrence's Goldfinch / LAGO / showed up in Grand Junction CO, at the same time we had LEGO, AMGO, and PISI at our thistle feeders...... not sure why, but our LAGO attracted birders from the east coast, west coast, gulf coast, yada yada, for two months....  but I'll add that it was a very regular visitor to our thistle and was following a female LEGO around ("following flights") and doing some rapid billing (“mandibulation") with her, as in mating behaviors, resulting in thousands of photos being taken, and two stenos filled with observational notes by visiting birders.  As well as a paper published in the Colorado Field Ornithologists Quarterly.

Not sure if anyone remembers my wren quiz from a few years ago, when me and a birding buddy found all of the North American wrens in one day without driving very far.  The reason we did that was because one of our first birds of the day in our campground was a Sedge Wren, so off we went to find the others, but that involved *both* being in the right part of the country (S Texas) and the right season (winter-ish) and t’was before Pacific Wren was peeled off from Winter Wren. 

 

BTW, when I first got fascinated by hummingbirds, I went directly home from work every day for years and headed straight into our back yard in Albuquerque, where our hum-feeders were concentrated, and I took notes~notes~notes, filling a 2" binder each year with *just* hummingbird observations because I was well beyond any hope for help from a psychiatrist, hahaha

 

Thx again Scott for notes on your observations, because it unlocked some of my own deeply buried memories/experiences   =)

 

Larry,

West Boise Greenbelt 

 

Birds Rock !!!

 




From: "Scott Tuthill" <satuthill@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2020 7:50:20 PM
Subject: [IBLE] An interesting day for yard birds!

Nothing like the first cold snap of the year to stir up the bird life. It was a crazy and memorable day here at my place in the Boise Highlands area (Ada County). It’s worth a story so I thought I would share.

 

Right at first light the continuing ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD made it’s first of many visits today to my feeders today. I brought the feeders in overnight to keep them from freezing. Out they went a bit before dawn and the Anna’s was right there. Then looking down to the ground under my seed feeders I saw at least 10 Mourning Doves – likely a yard record. There were a similar number of Juncos, whose numbers have been building slowly over the past couple of weeks. White-crowned Sparrow number spiked back up this morning after declining from an initial peak a couple weeks ago. There was a dozen or so – 75% first winter birds. A couple of Song Sparrows were in the mix. Up on the thistle feeder were a couple Pine Siskins and a few Lesser Goldfinches. The sunflower feeder had its attendant House Finches and in the surrounding trees the resident Red-breasted Nuthatches and visiting Black-capped Chickadees where moving around. It was one happy family until a Cooper’s Hawk swooped in also looking for it’s morning meal. That scattered everyone. I had to wonder if the hawk was one of the family that nested across the street this year – which is another story to itself.

 

Later in the afternoon I looked back out in the yard to see most of the same had returned and were joined by some California Quail. It is fun too see them back in the yard after my usual flock being dispersed or consumed by the Cooper’s Hawk family. Over the past week I have noticed that one White-crowned Sparrow is particularly aggressive. Whenever it fly’s in it chases away whatever birds are where it wants to feed. It is definitely of the sub-species “bullyae”. It was in the feeding group today. And, at one point I watched it go over and grab the tail of one of the quail in its beak and shake away. I have never seen this before and just had to laugh. I had my camera with me but was not able to capture it on “film”. For its part, the quail seem surprised but after the sparrow let go, it just went on feeding with its friends.

 

This builds up to one of the best 15 minutes of birding in my yard, ever—and I have lived here 26 year. A little before 6PM I saw the ANNA’s HUMMINGBIRD out feeding so I went outside with my camera to get some photos. As I looked down on the ground under the seed feeders there was a BLUE JAY. An all time new one for the yard. I have certainly been following the reports of them all over the state, but I was still shocked to see one in my yard. Unfortunately, I missed getting photos. As I looked around all of the birds from the morning were back, getting an evening meal before a cold night to come. I kept watch hoping the jay would come back but it didn’t. However, a Spotted Towhee came in. I have only a handful of prior yard records. As I kept watch I found the Anna’s perched in a maple tree just in front of me. I can’t wait to see how the photos turned out. A full frame Anna’s among the red and gold maple leaves. Just about then a flock of 20 American Robins flew by going one way and then a few Cedar Waxwings the other way. It was an amazing way to end the day.

 

I would love to create a quiz – “Where am I where I have an October 26 yard list with: Anna’s Hummingbird, Blue Jay, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and Cedar Waxwings”. Or something like that.

 

 


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