Date   

Re: Id.

ftcrase
 

some information on where and when the picture was taken might be helpful to an Id.

Fred Crase
New Ply mouth


Klamath Calamity - Urgent HELP Needed!

Richard and Ann Rusnak
 

In case you are interested in helping Malheur and Tule Lake deal with avian botulism outbreak.
Rich, Nampa

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Richard Rusnak <rarusnak62@...>
Date: Tue, Aug 25, 2020 at 10:18 AM
Subject: Fwd: Klamath Calamity - Urgent HELP Needed!
To: yahoogroups <ible@...>


In case you are interested in helping Malheur and Tule Lake deal with avian botulism outbreak.
Rich, Nampa

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Friends of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge <friends@...>
Date: Tue, Aug 25, 2020 at 10:15 AM
Subject: Klamath Calamity - Urgent HELP Needed!
To: <rarusnak62@...>


Klamath Calamity
Your Urgent Help Is Needed
Greetings Rich,
In the West, Malheur National Wildlife Refuge is just one among many Refuges that support the needs of migratory and breeding birds throughout the Pacific Flyway. In our neighboring basin to the west, the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge Complex is in trouble.

Tule Lake is at the heart of this complex and provides critical wetland habitat that waterfowl and shorebirds depend on. Here, Avian Botulism is spreading and is estimate to have already impacted over 30,000 birds. The Klamath Refuge Staff are being supported by the non-profit, Bird AllyX which has done the best they can to staff the on-site Duck Hospital.

Over 1,500 birds have now been admitted for rehabilitation in just over 1 month. In order to provide enough care to these birds, the Refuge and Bird AllyX have reached out and asked for our help.

To learn more, please watch the video or visit our Website.
The Friends of Malheur NWR will send Bird AllyX a grant of $4,000 to pay for 2 Duck Hospital Interns.
Please consider making a donation today to help fund this grant.

Thank you for helping us to help the birds of the Klamath Basin.

Janelle L Wicks
Executive Director
Friends of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge
Friends of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge | malheurfriends.org 
36391 Sodhouse Lane
Princeton, OR 97721 
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Id.

Robert Kiernan
 

 What  am I 


Coming for a visit

Mary Korkor
 

I have been watching posts and trying to figure out where I need to be for the four days I am in town. I am headed your direction from Wisconsin, where Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, Barred Owls and Blue Jays are common place, and plan to arrive late Sunday. Would anyone be interested in birding with me the week of August 31… I usually head to Hulls Gulch since I am in Boise visiting my son, but am open to reaching out and have transportation.

I am the one that found the Barred Owl, a common species here in Wisconsin, last year.

Good health to all.
Mary


Re: S Fork Boise River

Ken Miracle
 

great to hear about the Greater Sage Grouse. This time of year is can still be tough to tell the young of the year males and females apart. Also given the very dry conditions hens and their broods will usually be close to wet meadows, irrigated pastures, alfalfa fields etc. still looking for “ice cream plants” forbs.

On Aug 24, 2020, at 3:06 PM, John Shortis via groups.io <john_shortis@...> wrote:

Hi Birders,

Yesterday Amy Bechtel & I birded the S Fork between Hwy 20 & the Cow Creek bridge where you have to turn left to continue to Prairie, or right to Anderson Dam. A good birding spot is about 3 miles S of the bridge where there is a bunch of growth on a sharp curve on the road. Here, most unexpectedly, a Fox Sparrow showed itself v nicely for about a minute, but we couldn't relocate it after this.  Then a few miles N of here where there is usually an abundance of Lewis's Woodpeckers we found about 24 Turkeys grazing on a hillside, and 5 of them strolled across the road towards the river. But the real treat in the fading light was the sight of about 16 Greater Sage Grouse on the road right in front of us as we drove back, about 6 miles from Hwy 20. By the looks of them as far I could make out, they were all females.
Great end to the day!
John Shortis.   

Ken Miracle
chukar28@...
208-570-2780
"Not that we are sufficient in ourselves to claim anything as coming from us, but our sufficiency is from God" 2COR 3:5


S Fork Boise River

John Shortis
 

Hi Birders,

Yesterday Amy Bechtel & I birded the S Fork between Hwy 20 & the Cow Creek bridge where you have to turn left to continue to Prairie, or right to Anderson Dam. A good birding spot is about 3 miles S of the bridge where there is a bunch of growth on a sharp curve on the road. Here, most unexpectedly, a Fox Sparrow showed itself v nicely for about a minute, but we couldn't relocate it after this.  Then a few miles N of here where there is usually an abundance of Lewis's Woodpeckers we found about 24 Turkeys grazing on a hillside, and 5 of them strolled across the road towards the river. But the real treat in the fading light was the sight of about 16 Greater Sage Grouse on the road right in front of us as we drove back, about 6 miles from Hwy 20. By the looks of them as far I could make out, they were all females.
Great end to the day!
John Shortis.   


Dry lake

Robert Kiernan
 

Flooded playa 80+ ibis 7 l.b.dowicher 3 cimm.teals  rim rd. N.pond 2 b.n.stilts 1   immature night heron. S.pond 5 least peeps got there 7 :15 p.m.


Re: peaceful fast food lunch at the cemetery..... hahahahaha

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


 =)


From: "Elizabeth Medes" <liz.medes@...>
To: "IBLE" <IBLE@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, August 20, 2020 2:35:49 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] peaceful fast food lunch at the cemetery..... hahahahaha

Great story!

Liz Medes
Emmett

On Thu, Aug 20, 2020, 2:30 PM Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


I was about done eating when USPS showed up to deliver a pkg at the Hendricks headstone

hmmmmmm.....????

waiting a while to see if a hand would punch upward thru the ground to grab this pkg

it didn't happen

a crow showed up and pecked open the pkg, which fell apart and scattered sunflower seed around on the headstone...........

and then

a gob of house finches, goldfinches, house sparrows showed up for a peaceful dining experience..........


=)
 





Re: peaceful fast food lunch at the cemetery..... hahahahaha

Elizabeth Medes
 

Great story!

Liz Medes
Emmett

On Thu, Aug 20, 2020, 2:30 PM Larry Arnold <larnold47@...> wrote:


I was about done eating when USPS showed up to deliver a pkg at the Hendricks headstone

hmmmmmm.....????

waiting a while to see if a hand would punch upward thru the ground to grab this pkg

it didn't happen

a crow showed up and pecked open the pkg, which fell apart and scattered sunflower seed around on the headstone...........

and then

a gob of house finches, goldfinches, house sparrows showed up for a peaceful dining experience..........


=)
 




peaceful fast food lunch at the cemetery..... hahahahaha

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 



I was about done eating when USPS showed up to deliver a pkg at the Hendricks headstone

hmmmmmm.....????

waiting a while to see if a hand would punch upward thru the ground to grab this pkg

it didn't happen

a crow showed up and pecked open the pkg, which fell apart and scattered sunflower seed around on the headstone...........

and then

a gob of house finches, goldfinches, house sparrows showed up for a peaceful dining experience..........


=)
 




Re: Crossbill-apalooza including Type 10 ("Sitka Spruce") Red Crossbill

Larry Arnold <larnold47@...>
 


Hey Carl, thank you 10^6 for this informative and fun read about crossbills!!  Missy and I are now packing to move back to N Idaho…  ;-)   We esp love that Hoodoo area, almost any day at o’dark-thirty… camping thereabouts has got to be incredible!  I’m getting homesick just thinking about all the places you mention.  And since you mention it, I’ve also been longing to return to the Rubies this year, first place our daughter did a seriously long hike with us.

 

Congrats on that Type 10 RECR... =)   WOW !!!

 

Larry

 

 



From: "Carl Lundblad" <carl.lundblad@...>
To: "IBLE" <ible@groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, August 16, 2020 11:08:21 AM
Subject: [IBLE] Crossbill-apalooza including Type 10 ("Sitka Spruce") Red Crossbill

Birders,
North Idaho has been experiencing a veritable "Crossbill-apalooza" in recent weeks, with crossbills of various types in just about every wooded habitat from residential areas on the prairie to subalpine fir and every forest type in between. Red Crossbills of "call types" 2-4 have been commonly detected, and we are also hosting more White-winged Crossbills (and not just in the northernmost mountains of Boundary and Bonner Counties) than I have ever seen, here.  Abundant cone crops are ripening on many of our conifers and perhaps especially the hemlocks but also among other species. Birders in southern Idaho (and maybe places like the Ruby Mountains of northern Nevada) should also be alert for White-winged and various Red Crossbill types.

This past week I spent some time in the St. Joe Mountains, between the St. Joe and CDA Rivers and northeast of St. Maries Idaho.  Crossbills were everywhere, and the BLM Sheep Springs Trailhead, Overlook, and "Campground" was a particularly good location for observing and recording crossbills.  Among my many recordings, crossbill expert Tim Spahr picked out a recording of a Type 10 ("Sitka Spruce") Red Crossbill: https://ebird.org/checklist/S72406027.  This same location also hosted Red Crossbill types 2,3, 4, and a couple of flyby White-wings. Tim believes this is probably the first-documented Type 10 Red Crossbill for Idaho, and indeed it is the only eBird record between the Washington Cascades and the prairie of eastern North Dakota.

The area around nearby Crystal Lake was also full of crossbills, and as one leaves the lake (heading south and west towards the Pearson Peak trail) White-winged Crossbill became the most common crossbill: https://ebird.org/checklist/S72405939.

The Crystal Lake and Sheep Springs area is all part of the Crystal Lake Wilderness Study Area and provides delightful high-elevation hiking and birding in Benewah County, accessed by long rough approach roads from either the St. Joe. or CDA Rivers.  Other interesting birds in the general area included a Rock Wren near Pearson Peak, a couple of fly-by Clark's Nutcrackers, and a Northern Goshawk.  

Nearby in the CDA River Valley and Chain of Lakes region, I checked out the shorebirds at Schlepp Ranch, recently reported on by Doug Ward.  Present on Thursday afternoon were numerous mostly-distant shorebirds including a Pectoral Sandpiper, 4 Black-necked Stilts, 3 Baird's Sandpipers, Western, Least, and both Yellowlegs.  A few more Least Sandpipers were at the Canyon Rd. Marsh, north of I-90 at Rose Lake (see eBird hotspot).  Earlier in the day, 3 juvenile Franklin's Gulls were at Sandpoint City Beach with the first adult Herring Gull of the season.  Two Solitary Sandpipers were where Edgemere Cutoff Road crosses Hoodoo Creek in the Hoodoo Valley of SW Bonner County.  It was nice to wake up to the calls ("skiews") of a Northern Saw-whet Owl and then the toots of a Northern Pygmy Owl, at my random campsite on Hoodoo Mountain, Thursday morning.

Good Birding,

Carl Lundblad
Moscow, ID


Crossbill-apalooza including Type 10 ("Sitka Spruce") Red Crossbill

Carl Lundblad
 

Birders,

North Idaho has been experiencing a veritable "Crossbill-apalooza" in recent weeks, with crossbills of various types in just about every wooded habitat from residential areas on the prairie to subalpine fir and every forest type in between. Red Crossbills of "call types" 2-4 have been commonly detected, and we are also hosting more White-winged Crossbills (and not just in the northernmost mountains of Boundary and Bonner Counties) than I have ever seen, here.  Abundant cone crops are ripening on many of our conifers and perhaps especially the hemlocks but also among other species. Birders in southern Idaho (and maybe places like the Ruby Mountains of northern Nevada) should also be alert for White-winged and various Red Crossbill types.

This past week I spent some time in the St. Joe Mountains, between the St. Joe and CDA Rivers and northeast of St. Maries Idaho.  Crossbills were everywhere, and the BLM Sheep Springs Trailhead, Overlook, and "Campground" was a particularly good location for observing and recording crossbills.  Among my many recordings, crossbill expert Tim Spahr picked out a recording of a Type 10 ("Sitka Spruce") Red Crossbill: https://ebird.org/checklist/S72406027.  This same location also hosted Red Crossbill types 2,3, 4, and a couple of flyby White-wings. Tim believes this is probably the first-documented Type 10 Red Crossbill for Idaho, and indeed it is the only eBird record between the Washington Cascades and the prairie of eastern North Dakota.

The area around nearby Crystal Lake was also full of crossbills, and as one leaves the lake (heading south and west towards the Pearson Peak trail) White-winged Crossbill became the most common crossbill: https://ebird.org/checklist/S72405939.

The Crystal Lake and Sheep Springs area is all part of the Crystal Lake Wilderness Study Area and provides delightful high-elevation hiking and birding in Benewah County, accessed by long rough approach roads from either the St. Joe. or CDA Rivers.  Other interesting birds in the general area included a Rock Wren near Pearson Peak, a couple of fly-by Clark's Nutcrackers, and a Northern Goshawk.  

Nearby in the CDA River Valley and Chain of Lakes region, I checked out the shorebirds at Schlepp Ranch, recently reported on by Doug Ward.  Present on Thursday afternoon were numerous mostly-distant shorebirds including a Pectoral Sandpiper, 4 Black-necked Stilts, 3 Baird's Sandpipers, Western, Least, and both Yellowlegs.  A few more Least Sandpipers were at the Canyon Rd. Marsh, north of I-90 at Rose Lake (see eBird hotspot).  Earlier in the day, 3 juvenile Franklin's Gulls were at Sandpoint City Beach with the first adult Herring Gull of the season.  Two Solitary Sandpipers were where Edgemere Cutoff Road crosses Hoodoo Creek in the Hoodoo Valley of SW Bonner County.  It was nice to wake up to the calls ("skiews") of a Northern Saw-whet Owl and then the toots of a Northern Pygmy Owl, at my random campsite on Hoodoo Mountain, Thursday morning.

Good Birding,

Carl Lundblad
Moscow, ID


Hummingbird Numbers Estimate

lcarrigan_55
 

It was Bill Moore who peaked my interest in estimating total hummingbird numbers to my feeders. He uses a caloric intake calculation which would be a quite accurate method. In Googling his method & others, I've also found another calculation. Take most hummer numbers seen at feeders at one time & multiply by 6. 

I've been checking both methods the past week & found that each gives results within 2-3 birds of one another. Yesterday, at most, by each calculation would have had 36 hummers. This AM, 18. This AM, seeing juv Black-chinned & Calliope only. Makes me wish I had watched real-time Doppler last night (as previously discussed with Robert) to look for an outgoing rush of "biologics". As seeing much fewer BH Grosbeak numbers this AM, as well. 

In any case, appears fall movement to the south of songbirds has started in earnest. Not surprising, with recent onset of heat wave, wildfires & cool mornings. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: Hummingbirds Continue

lcarrigan_55
 

Interesting, re: the molting info, Bill. Earlier in the week, I was seeing some "scruffy" juveniles, mainly Black-chinned. Since Thu, all are bright & fresh looking. 

I haven't seen an adult of any, Black-chinned, Rufous nor Calliope, since Wed. All are juveniles & still getting all 3. Although, Rufous are fewest in number, as of today.  No Broad-taileds here, as of yet. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: Hummingbirds Continue

Bill Moore
 

I’m still getting many hummers. I refilled feeder number 132 today after three yesterday. That’s a few ahead of last year’s figures, retired engineers do numbers. I guess I’ve got all normal species, but not many rufous if any. They are displaying and charging each other with passion.
One observation after Jay’s molting facts, are some are brilliantly feathered, M & F, and some are quite dusky and mottled. Last year the feeder numbers dropped precipitously at August month end.

We are a breeding mecca for house wrens. There were two batches in the garage, two in bird house on driveway and several batches around the house. Now I think a pair is trying one more time in the yews under the front window.

No Bluebirds alas.

Bill Moore

On Aug 15, 2020, at 3:37 PM, lcarrigan_55 via groups.io <lcarrigan_55@...> wrote:

Seeing lots of juvenile hummingbirds. Have: Black-chinned, Rufous & Calliope. The only time they're semi-tolerant of one another is right at daybreak. They're at least civil, with a hummer perched at each port & sev hovering, waiting their turn. But, after about 20 minutes, pure chaos. I've seen at least 11 individual hummingbirds, including a juv Black-chinned with some leucistic wing feathers. 

Based on previous correspondence with Bill Moore, calculated by how much nectar they're consuming, at least 35 diff't hummers are hitting the feeder. Also, saw 2 juvenile Spotted Towhees scratching under the seed feeder, bringing nesting birds to #31 for the place. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: Hummingbirds Continue

Elizabeth Medes
 

Brian, we had a flurry of black-chinned and rufous duking it out for a week, and now near silence.  They did drain the 2 cup feeders in a matter of days, I guess I should do the math but that sounds like plenty.  I'm waiting for a broad-tailed to show up.  Or at least a Calliope.  The hummers are hitting the hyssop fairly hard as well.

Liz Medes
Emmett

On Sat, Aug 15, 2020 at 3:37 PM lcarrigan_55 via groups.io <lcarrigan_55=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Seeing lots of juvenile hummingbirds. Have: Black-chinned, Rufous & Calliope. The only time they're semi-tolerant of one another is right at daybreak. They're at least civil, with a hummer perched at each port & sev hovering, waiting their turn. But, after about 20 minutes, pure chaos. I've seen at least 11 individual hummingbirds, including a juv Black-chinned with some leucistic wing feathers. 

Based on previous correspondence with Bill Moore, calculated by how much nectar they're consuming, at least 35 diff't hummers are hitting the feeder. Also, saw 2 juvenile Spotted Towhees scratching under the seed feeder, bringing nesting birds to #31 for the place. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Hummingbirds Continue

lcarrigan_55
 

Seeing lots of juvenile hummingbirds. Have: Black-chinned, Rufous & Calliope. The only time they're semi-tolerant of one another is right at daybreak. They're at least civil, with a hummer perched at each port & sev hovering, waiting their turn. But, after about 20 minutes, pure chaos. I've seen at least 11 individual hummingbirds, including a juv Black-chinned with some leucistic wing feathers. 

Based on previous correspondence with Bill Moore, calculated by how much nectar they're consuming, at least 35 diff't hummers are hitting the feeder. Also, saw 2 juvenile Spotted Towhees scratching under the seed feeder, bringing nesting birds to #31 for the place. 

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: Swainson's hawk, Hummers

Elizabeth Medes
 

Many thanks for that foot tip.  I'll remember that.  The chest pattern told me RT but all the white on the face made me think otherwise.  Happy to be set straight.  Between here and Montour at the moment it is thick with raptors, particularly late evening.  Nice place to practice.

Liz Medes
Emmett, the east side

On Fri, Aug 14, 2020 at 11:43 AM Mark Stackhouse <westwings@...> wrote:
Hola Liz and Chuck,

Yes, Chuck is correct - I didn’t see the original photos from your yard, and assumed we were talking about the photo in the second post. But the photos of the hawk in your yard are indeed of a juvenile Red-tailed, as Chuck says. 

I feel that stability has returned to the universe, as it was very disconcerting to me to disagree with Chuck on an i.d. ;-) 

Liz, note the difference in the feet on your photo on the fence post, and the Macauley Library photo of the Swainson’s.

Glad that’s cleared up . . .

Mark

Mark Stackhouse
from Mexico:
01-323-285-1243 (San Blas, Nayarit)
001-801-518-5618 (cellular - U.S. and Mexico)
from  U.S.
011-52-323-285-1243 or
1-801-518-5618


On Aug 14, 2020, at 9:38 AM, Elizabeth Medes <liz.medes@...> wrote:

Gracias, Mark, nice to get feedback.  And thank you Chuck.  Just to be clear my first photos were in my yard,  the second post was from Maccauley and labeled "Swainson Hawk."

I'm not sure if it was the Swainson or an RT this a.m. that took out the kestrel nest in our front maple.  We woke up to a ton of racket, lots of kestrel alarms, and upon leaving for our walk, a hawk flew out of the maple carrying what looked like nesting material and a nestling, which he casually ate for breakfast at the top of a utility pole while the kestrels mobbed him.

Typically the kestrels nest in a box here, but they moved into the maple this spring - this would be a second clutch, and now I'm afraid it's gone.  I didn't know hawks would raid a kestrel nest.  Dang...

Liz Medes
Emmett ID


Re: Swainson's hawk, Hummers

Mark Stackhouse
 

Hola Liz and Chuck,

Yes, Chuck is correct - I didn’t see the original photos from your yard, and assumed we were talking about the photo in the second post. But the photos of the hawk in your yard are indeed of a juvenile Red-tailed, as Chuck says. 

I feel that stability has returned to the universe, as it was very disconcerting to me to disagree with Chuck on an i.d. ;-) 

Liz, note the difference in the feet on your photo on the fence post, and the Macauley Library photo of the Swainson’s.

Glad that’s cleared up . . .

Mark

Mark Stackhouse
from Mexico:
01-323-285-1243 (San Blas, Nayarit)
001-801-518-5618 (cellular - U.S. and Mexico)
from  U.S.
011-52-323-285-1243 or
1-801-518-5618


On Aug 14, 2020, at 9:38 AM, Elizabeth Medes <liz.medes@...> wrote:

Gracias, Mark, nice to get feedback.  And thank you Chuck.  Just to be clear my first photos were in my yard,  the second post was from Maccauley and labeled "Swainson Hawk."

I'm not sure if it was the Swainson or an RT this a.m. that took out the kestrel nest in our front maple.  We woke up to a ton of racket, lots of kestrel alarms, and upon leaving for our walk, a hawk flew out of the maple carrying what looked like nesting material and a nestling, which he casually ate for breakfast at the top of a utility pole while the kestrels mobbed him.

Typically the kestrels nest in a box here, but they moved into the maple this spring - this would be a second clutch, and now I'm afraid it's gone.  I didn't know hawks would raid a kestrel nest.  Dang...

Liz Medes
Emmett ID


Re: Swainson's hawk, Hummers

Elizabeth Medes
 

Gracias, Mark, nice to get feedback.  And thank you Chuck.  Just to be clear my first photos were in my yard,  the second post was from Maccauley and labeled "Swainson Hawk."

I'm not sure if it was the Swainson or an RT this a.m. that took out the kestrel nest in our front maple.  We woke up to a ton of racket, lots of kestrel alarms, and upon leaving for our walk, a hawk flew out of the maple carrying what looked like nesting material and a nestling, which he casually ate for breakfast at the top of a utility pole while the kestrels mobbed him.

Typically the kestrels nest in a box here, but they moved into the maple this spring - this would be a second clutch, and now I'm afraid it's gone.  I didn't know hawks would raid a kestrel nest.  Dang...

Liz Medes
Emmett ID

681 - 700 of 33386