Date   

Re: False alarm on the Lon-eared Owl

John Shortis
 

I have to say when I saw your 1st photo, it didn't look right for a Long-eared Owl. The ear-tufts on the L-E Owl are closer together and the face pattern is entirely different. Having said that, last week I was at Foote Park and I saw there the smallest G-H Owl I have ever seen and I had to look a few times to be sure, especially as my owl had more brownish tints in its plumage than the avarage in Idaho. But the face pattern, position of the ear tufts and even on this smaller bird, the barrel shaped body ruled out a L-E Owl.  
We all make mis-identifications no matter how long we've been birding, I know I have and will probably make more in the future!
 
John.
 

From: David Lawrence
To: 'IBLE'
Sent: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 8:54 PM
Subject: [IBLE] False alarm on the Lon-eared Owl
 
Cheryl and I have both re-evaluated the photos and the field guides and we agree we made a serious mis-identification.  The bird was in fact a very slender, elongated looking Great Horned Owl.  Sorry.
 
Dave Lawrence
Nampa, ID   83651
 


False alarm on the Lon-eared Owl

David Lawrence <lawde13@...>
 

Cheryl and I have both re-evaluated the photos and the field guides and we agree we made a serious mis-identification.  The bird was in fact a very slender, elongated looking Great Horned Owl.  Sorry.

 

Dave Lawrence

lawde13@...

Nampa, ID  83651

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lawde13/

 


Re: Bewick's Wrens - Avimor, Ada Co

jedidiahpetersen@ymail.com
 

I will second what Cliff said.  While I was down there looking for the Scott's Orioles that inhabit the area, I ran across 2 bewicks wrens that were very angry that I was in the area.    There are not a lot of them, but they are there.   

Some day I will find the scott's oriole too.

Jed Petersen
pocatello



From: Cliff and Lisa Weisse
To: Charles Swift
Cc: ible@...
Sent: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 6:26 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Bewick's Wrens - Avimor, Ada Co

 
It seems they are also expanding northward from the Great Basin although it's more likely they were missed in that area in past years due to lack of coverage.  But they do seem to be breeding in areas where they were not known in the past like Green and Black Pine Canyons near Curlew Grasslands.  Jay and Heidi found multiple birds at both locations a few years ago including an apparent family group.

Cliff

On 2/6/2013 5:47 PM, Charles Swift wrote:
 
Bewick's Wrens are expanding in Idaho. Evidence suggests they initially colonized the Lewiston area, probably about 25 years ago, and have been expanding east, north, and south from there. They probably expand mostly along rivers and river tributaries that support their preferred brushy habitat. My guess (hypothesis) is that the Boise population is a result of the population slowly expanding upstream (south) along the Snake R. and then up tributaries. They have also recently been reported along the Weiser R. (Adams Co.). A few weeks ago I had one along the Salmon R. about 30 miles or so north of Riggins.

thanks, Charles.

On Wed, Feb 6, 2013 at 3:20 PM, Robert Mortensen <birdingisfun@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Robert Mortensen included below]
I was out at Avimor today around the lunch hour. I heard what I thought was a Song Sparrow, but then found this Bewick's Wren singing away. There were two actually. One right by the bridge of Spring Creek at the entrance to Avimor off Hwy 55 and another a bit south of there. Others have reported Bewick's Wrens at Avimor and I think I saw one there one spring a few years ago. Terry Gray see's them up north. They are occasionally seen in the Treasure Valley. eBird still flags them as rare and needing documentation. Field guide app range maps suggest that they may occur in Idaho, especially up north, but not as regularly as we are seeing them in the Boise foothills areas. Lew Ulrey and Gary Worthington have reported them from Eagle Island State Park on several occasions. Foote Park also seems to be a good spot for them. I wonder if Bewick's Wrens in SW Idaho is a relatively new phenomenon or have they been here all along and we just missed 'em because we didn't used to bird the foothills as much.



--
Charles Swift
Moscow, Idaho
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
email: chaetura@...


--
Cliff and Lisa Weisse
Island Park, Idaho
cliffandlisa@...



Pic of the Long-eared Owl @ Avimor

David Lawrence <lawde13@...>
 

Here is a photo of the Long-eared Owl found at Avimor late this afternoon.

 

Dave Lawrence

lawde13@...

Nampa, ID  83651

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lawde13/

 


Long-eared Owl

David Lawrence <lawde13@...>
 

Cheryl Huizinga and I went to Avimor late this afternoon to see if we could locate the Bewick's Wrens.  We were successful.  As a big bonus we also found a Long-eared Owl.

 

This was a great ending to a full day of birding that started out with the Eurasian Wigeon and included great looks at a Northern Pygmy Owl in the Third Forks area of Gem County.  Other highlights for us were:  Steller's Jay, Hairy Woodpecker, and several Bald Eagles.

 

Dave Lawrence

lawde13@...

Nampa, ID  83651

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lawde13/

 


Re: Bewick's Wrens - Avimor, Ada Co

Cliff Weisse
 

It seems they are also expanding northward from the Great Basin although it's more likely they were missed in that area in past years due to lack of coverage.  But they do seem to be breeding in areas where they were not known in the past like Green and Black Pine Canyons near Curlew Grasslands.  Jay and Heidi found multiple birds at both locations a few years ago including an apparent family group.

Cliff

On 2/6/2013 5:47 PM, Charles Swift wrote:
 

Bewick's Wrens are expanding in Idaho. Evidence suggests they initially colonized the Lewiston area, probably about 25 years ago, and have been expanding east, north, and south from there. They probably expand mostly along rivers and river tributaries that support their preferred brushy habitat. My guess (hypothesis) is that the Boise population is a result of the population slowly expanding upstream (south) along the Snake R. and then up tributaries. They have also recently been reported along the Weiser R. (Adams Co.). A few weeks ago I had one along the Salmon R. about 30 miles or so north of Riggins.


thanks, Charles.

On Wed, Feb 6, 2013 at 3:20 PM, Robert Mortensen <birdingisfun@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Robert Mortensen included below]

I was out at Avimor today around the lunch hour. I heard what I thought was a Song Sparrow, but then found this Bewick's Wren singing away. There were two actually. One right by the bridge of Spring Creek at the entrance to Avimor off Hwy 55 and another a bit south of there. Others have reported Bewick's Wrens at Avimor and I think I saw one there one spring a few years ago. Terry Gray see's them up north. They are occasionally seen in the Treasure Valley. eBird still flags them as rare and needing documentation. Field guide app range maps suggest that they may occur in Idaho, especially up north, but not as regularly as we are seeing them in the Boise foothills areas. Lew Ulrey and Gary Worthington have reported them from Eagle Island State Park on several occasions. Foote Park also seems to be a good spot for them. I wonder if Bewick's Wrens in SW Idaho is a relatively new phenomenon or have they been here all along and we just missed 'em because we didn't used to bird the foothills as much.




--
Charles Swift
Moscow, Idaho
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
email: chaetura@...


-- 
Cliff and Lisa Weisse
Island Park, Idaho
cliffandlisa@...


Re: Bewick's Wrens - Avimor, Ada Co

Charles Swift
 

Quick follow-up. I found a reference in the BNA account reporting Bewick's Wren expansion into se WA and w. ID (Snake-Clearwater confluence area) in the mid-1990's so 20-25 years is about right  (I bet there are some slightly earlier records - Shirley Sturts may have some of these). Another possible source population for the southwest ID birds is from northeastern OR (LaGrande area in particular appears to have a pretty good population). These is hypothesis 2 for the origin of these birds.

thanks!
Charles.


On Wed, Feb 6, 2013 at 4:47 PM, Charles Swift <chaetura@...> wrote:
 

Bewick's Wrens are expanding in Idaho. Evidence suggests they initially colonized the Lewiston area, probably about 25 years ago, and have been expanding east, north, and south from there. They probably expand mostly along rivers and river tributaries that support their preferred brushy habitat. My guess (hypothesis) is that the Boise population is a result of the population slowly expanding upstream (south) along the Snake R. and then up tributaries. They have also recently been reported along the Weiser R. (Adams Co.). A few weeks ago I had one along the Salmon R. about 30 miles or so north of Riggins.


thanks, Charles.

On Wed, Feb 6, 2013 at 3:20 PM, Robert Mortensen <birdingisfun@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Robert Mortensen included below]

I was out at Avimor today around the lunch hour. I heard what I thought was a Song Sparrow, but then found this Bewick's Wren singing away. There were two actually. One right by the bridge of Spring Creek at the entrance to Avimor off Hwy 55 and another a bit south of there. Others have reported Bewick's Wrens at Avimor and I think I saw one there one spring a few years ago. Terry Gray see's them up north. They are occasionally seen in the Treasure Valley. eBird still flags them as rare and needing documentation. Field guide app range maps suggest that they may occur in Idaho, especially up north, but not as regularly as we are seeing them in the Boise foothills areas. Lew Ulrey and Gary Worthington have reported them from Eagle Island State Park on several occasions. Foote Park also seems to be a good spot for them. I wonder if Bewick's Wrens in SW Idaho is a relatively new phenomenon or have they been here all along and we just missed 'em because we didn't used to bird the foothills as much.




--
Charles Swift
Moscow, Idaho
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
email: chaetura@...




--
Charles Swift
Moscow, Idaho
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
email: chaetura@...


Re: Bewick's Wrens - Avimor, Ada Co [2 Attachments]

Charles Swift
 

Bewick's Wrens are expanding in Idaho. Evidence suggests they initially colonized the Lewiston area, probably about 25 years ago, and have been expanding east, north, and south from there. They probably expand mostly along rivers and river tributaries that support their preferred brushy habitat. My guess (hypothesis) is that the Boise population is a result of the population slowly expanding upstream (south) along the Snake R. and then up tributaries. They have also recently been reported along the Weiser R. (Adams Co.). A few weeks ago I had one along the Salmon R. about 30 miles or so north of Riggins.

thanks, Charles.


On Wed, Feb 6, 2013 at 3:20 PM, Robert Mortensen <birdingisfun@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Robert Mortensen included below]

I was out at Avimor today around the lunch hour. I heard what I thought was a Song Sparrow, but then found this Bewick's Wren singing away. There were two actually. One right by the bridge of Spring Creek at the entrance to Avimor off Hwy 55 and another a bit south of there. Others have reported Bewick's Wrens at Avimor and I think I saw one there one spring a few years ago. Terry Gray see's them up north. They are occasionally seen in the Treasure Valley. eBird still flags them as rare and needing documentation. Field guide app range maps suggest that they may occur in Idaho, especially up north, but not as regularly as we are seeing them in the Boise foothills areas. Lew Ulrey and Gary Worthington have reported them from Eagle Island State Park on several occasions. Foote Park also seems to be a good spot for them. I wonder if Bewick's Wrens in SW Idaho is a relatively new phenomenon or have they been here all along and we just missed 'em because we didn't used to bird the foothills as much.




--
Charles Swift
Moscow, Idaho
46°43′54″ N, 116°59′50″ W
email: chaetura@...


Re: Bewick's Wrens - Avimor, Ada Co [2 Attachments]

bird_nut
 

I dropped by quickly to see the Bewick's at 9:15am this morning.  It was in full and almost non-stop song.  
Paul


On Feb 6, 2013, at 4:20 PM, Robert Mortensen <birdingisfun@...> wrote:

 

I was out at Avimor today around the lunch hour. I heard what I thought was a Song Sparrow, but then found this Bewick's Wren singing away. There were two actually. One right by the bridge of Spring Creek at the entrance to Avimor off Hwy 55 and another a bit south of there. Others have reported Bewick's Wrens at Avimor and I think I saw one there one spring a few years ago. Terry Gray see's them up north. They are occasionally seen in the Treasure Valley. eBird still flags them as rare and needing documentation. Field guide app range maps suggest that they may occur in Idaho, especially up north, but not as regularly as we are seeing them in the Boise foothills areas. Lew Ulrey and Gary Worthington have reported them from Eagle Island State Park on several occasions. Foote Park also seems to be a good spot for them. I wonder if Bewick's Wrens in SW Idaho is a relatively new phenomenon or have they been here all along and we just missed 'em because we didn't used to bird the foothills as much.


Re: Eurasian Wigeon, Ada County, Eagle, Corner of Floating Feather & Shadypark

Anonymous
 

The Eurasian Wigeon was still present this morning.


Bewick's Wrens - Avimor, Ada Co

Robert Mortensen <birdingisfun@...>
 

I was out at Avimor today around the lunch hour. I heard what I thought was a Song Sparrow, but then found this Bewick's Wren singing away. There were two actually. One right by the bridge of Spring Creek at the entrance to Avimor off Hwy 55 and another a bit south of there. Others have reported Bewick's Wrens at Avimor and I think I saw one there one spring a few years ago. Terry Gray see's them up north. They are occasionally seen in the Treasure Valley. eBird still flags them as rare and needing documentation. Field guide app range maps suggest that they may occur in Idaho, especially up north, but not as regularly as we are seeing them in the Boise foothills areas. Lew Ulrey and Gary Worthington have reported them from Eagle Island State Park on several occasions. Foote Park also seems to be a good spot for them. I wonder if Bewick's Wrens in SW Idaho is a relatively new phenomenon or have they been here all along and we just missed 'em because we didn't used to bird the foothills as much.


Payette county

Peggy WILLIAMS
 

Thanks to Tim Teal our list is growing. Check out his photos on Idaho Birding.

 

13 Barn owl                       1/13       Hwy 52

14 California Quail           1/13       2nd Ave S Payette

15 Horned lark                  1/13       Little Willow Rd

16 Northern flicker           1/21       Little Willow Rd

17 Bald eagle                     1/27       Little Willow Rd

18 Golden eagle                1/27       Little Willow Rd

19 Canada goose              1/27       Bluff Rd

20 Dark-eyed junco          1/27       Bluff Rd

21 Common merganser  1/27       SW 4th Fruitland

22 Red-wing blackbird     1/27       Big Willow Rd

23 American coot             1/30       River Rd

24 Mallard                          1/30       River Rd              

25 Cooper’s hawk            2/4         ?

All of the above seen by Tim

 

26 Hairy Woodpecker      2/5         Big Willow Rd  seen by me.

 

Peggy Williams

 


Re: [Idaho Birding] A friends of mine are traveling from Pocatello to...

heidithebirdnerd
 

Here's some links to information about this issue.
Boise State raptor research folks (Dr. Jim Belthoff and his grad students) have studied this issue some in the past. Plus, now we have a "sensory ecology lab" at Boise State run by my adviser Jesse Barber. We would like to someday expand on work that Dr. Belthoff has already done and work with him to solve the mystery.

This has been an ongoing mystery with Barn Owls in Europe as well, but they were able to partially solve the problem using hedgerows bordering the roads....That's not such a viable option in the Idaho desert though!

You can read more about the problem, and Boise State's involvement here:
http://www.opb.org/news/article/mystery-dead-barn-owl/
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/640197392/I-84-a-death-strip-for-barn-owls.html?pg=all
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/650221073/Boise-scientist-calls-deaths-of-barn-owls-along-freeway-alarming.html?pg=all
http://raptorresearchcenter.boisestate.edu/boves-than-j/


~Heidi
Boise



From: Ileana I. Cordova <ileana.cordova@...>
To: ible@...
Sent: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 2:35 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Fwd: [Idaho Birding] A friends of mine are traveling from Pocatello to...

 
I saw this post on Idaho Birding and thought I'd pass it along to IBLE.

Ileana Cordova
Boise
A friends of mine are traveling from Pocatello...
Jo Rita Knopf 11:50am Feb 6
A friends of mine are traveling from Pocatello to Boise, I-86. They're finding MANY dead owls and hawks all along the road. Any idea why? They want to "contact" somebody about this. Who would that be? Thanks! Jo

View Post on Facebook · Edit Email Settings · Reply to this email to add a comment.




[Idaho Birding] A friends of mine are traveling from Pocatello to...

Ileana I. Cordova <ileana.cordova@...>
 

I saw this post on Idaho Birding and thought I'd pass it along to IBLE.

Ileana Cordova
Boise
A friends of mine are traveling from Pocatello...
Jo Rita Knopf 11:50am Feb 6
A friends of mine are traveling from Pocatello to Boise, I-86. They're finding MANY dead owls and hawks all along the road. Any idea why? They want to "contact" somebody about this. Who would that be? Thanks! Jo

View Post on Facebook · Edit Email Settings · Reply to this email to add a comment.


Re: Eurasian Wigeon, Ada County, Eagle, Corner of Floating Feather & Shadypark

Anonymous
 

The Eurasian Wigeon was still present this morning.


Highly Recommended Daily Allowance

bike4birds
 

Since I hadn't been down to the gravel pits west of Glenwood since the snow first flew, I've been looking forward to finding out what treasures were lurking there. While there are still some icy patches on the island between Boise and Garden City (near the stables at Les Bois), both Garden City and Boise have clear paths. So I headed straight for the pits as soon as I got on the greenbelt. Unfortunately, the newest section of the path, about a mile west of Glenwood, still had some slushy patches that tried (unsuccessfully) to dump me.
 
But the trip was well worth it. FOY birds included Green-winged Teal, Bufflehead, Killdeer and N. Pintail, plus I found Cooper's and Sharp-shinned Hawks, RT Hawk, A. Kestrel and Bald Eagles. (I also saw a small falcon in the right area for a Merlin, but it was too far away against a bright but cloudy sky.) The first gravel pit is always the birdiest and, in addition to the FOY birds, there were lots of ducks there that I only occasionally see further upriver. Also, the heronry already has plenty of residents, but I didn't notice any DC Cormorants yet. I had 38 birds as I headed home and then a Brown Creeper sounded off so I could find him, and a PB Grebe showed himself as I crossed the bridge by the stables. I thanked them both.
 
Since 20 birds is my MDA and 30 is my RDA, I've decided 40 must be the Highly Recommended Daily Allowance (HRDA). Of course it took me 18 miles to achieve that, but it was a great ride. Tom McCabe, Boise


Bird id

Bob Kiernan
 

Should have sent this front view first oh well.


Immature male vermilion fly catcher photo taken end of Jan.death valley n.p. ca.

Bob Kiernan
 

Sorry. About all mix up between. Two postings


Re: Bird Id [1 Attachment]

Richard and Ann Rusnak
 

Looks like a female or immature v flycatcer

On Feb 5, 2013, at 7:45 PM, Bob Kiernan <idahobirdman1@...> wrote:

 

I guess picture.did not go thru maybe this time bob k.




Emmett North raptor route

Peggy WILLIAMS
 

Today’s findings include:

35 Red-tails

22 Am kestrel

1 Northern harrier

6 Bald eagles

1 Rough-legged hawk

1 Prairie falcon

2 Cooper’s hawks

1 Sharp-shinned hawk

Hope this inversion pulls out of here soon.

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