Date   

Re: Barred Owls in Boise?

Richard and Ann Rusnak
 

Hi Ibler's, Just an FYI about my personal experience with Barred owls dispersals into the NW. In May 1994 I was backpacking in NE Oregon's Monument Rock wilderness and was serenaded most of the night by a barred owl. 
Having recently moved here from GA, (where they are common) I was quite surprised and only read a few years later about them displacing the Spotted owls. Also a Barred owl spent a good portion of the winter in Barber Park, Boise in the late 90's, don't remember what year.
Good day, Rich Rusnak

On Dec 26, 2010, at 9:48 AM, Jay Carlisle wrote:

 

Happy holidays ;-)
 
Mark Collie (no e-mail) relayed some info to me: he & other people in the neighborhood have detected Barred Owls in the area S and SW of Timberline High School b/t Apple & Gekeler and the Ridenbaugh canal.  As far as I know, no one has had visual confirmation during daylight hours but several people familiar with the species have heard 1 or 2 birds - maybe going back as far as August!
 
Having seen this species in Idaho previously, searching for the birds isn't a pressing issue for me but I figured I'd get the info out there in case anyone was in the neighborhood and/or really wants to try to hear or see these birds.
 
There's a small community park off E Carter (accessed from Gekeler) between S Bridgeport and E Fairbrook where a short trail leads to the canal ... birds have apparently been heard here and further E/NE.
 
This is all I know ;-) ...  Good luck!
 
Jay




Barred Owls in Boise?

Jay Carlisle
 

Happy holidays ;-)
 
Mark Collie (no e-mail) relayed some info to me: he & other people in the neighborhood have detected Barred Owls in the area S and SW of Timberline High School b/t Apple & Gekeler and the Ridenbaugh canal.  As far as I know, no one has had visual confirmation during daylight hours but several people familiar with the species have heard 1 or 2 birds - maybe going back as far as August!
 
Having seen this species in Idaho previously, searching for the birds isn't a pressing issue for me but I figured I'd get the info out there in case anyone was in the neighborhood and/or really wants to try to hear or see these birds.
 
There's a small community park off E Carter (accessed from Gekeler) between S Bridgeport and E Fairbrook where a short trail leads to the canal ... birds have apparently been heard here and further E/NE.
 
This is all I know ;-) ...  Good luck!
 
Jay


Flicker Damage - another take

Dave Faike
 

While working as a rec-tech in Colorado we waged continual warfare with rodents, mammals and birds that liked to eat/peck/gnaw-on and otherwise destroy wooden out-buildings and signs. For jollies we bought a case of cayenne pepper and added 1-2 cans to each gallon of paint/stain and virtually ended the problem. It worked so well that for a short while finding cayenne pepper in Estes Park was extremely difficult. Give it a whir. df


Great-tailed Grackles in Burley

Cliff Weisse
 

Yesterday we stopped at Wendy's in Burley and there was a flock of Great-tailed Grackles on the Maverick next door.  We counted 15 with at least three adult males. 

Cliff


Re: Flicker Damage

DONNELL NITA HUNTER <hunterdn@...>
 

Thanks Mike.  I figured it to be some of territorial strutting.  I'm not sure where our flickers nest.  I have put out bird houses for wrens and chickadees.  It was fun to watch a starling try to fit into the wren-sized hole of one old weathered bird box.  It didn't take him long to give up and go elsewhere. 
 
Don Hunter
LaBelle (Rigby)
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Mike Munts
Sent: Saturday, December 25, 2010 2:42 AM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Flicker Damage

 

Brian is correct it I very difficult to completely deter flickers from wood. By changing the siding material they don't seem to recognize that it is material they could penetrate even easier than solid wood in most cases.
 
Don, what I think you are experiencing is a behavior called drumming. Most (if not all) woodpecker species do this.  Drumming typically consists of a series of rapid strike on the sounding object. These are very rapid and individual hits are difficult to distinguish. Flickers especially will seek out metal that will vibrate and help amplify the sound. This is equivalent to singing in songbirds or hooting in owls. Flickers usually aren't too bad if the metal is not too thin. When I was growing up north of Sandpoint we would have Pileated Woodpeckers come in each spring and drum on the stove pipe coming from the wood stove or on the metal siding or roof on my dad' shop. So I can attest to the sound amplification coming from the metal.
Mike
Arco
 
Sent: Friday, December 24, 2010 7:39 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Flicker Damage

 

We have steel siding, so have had no trouble with excessive flickering,  However in the spring our resident Flicker likes to sound the alarm by drumming on the cowling (or whatever it is) at the top of the fireplace vent, some sort of fanfare for the uncommon man.
 
 
Don Hunter
LaBelle (Rigby)
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, December 24, 2010 4:38 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Flicker Damage

 

I have personal experience with this type problem. My damage was to wood cedar-siding on my cabin. I tried all remedies: fake owls, fake snakes and multiple "deterrent agents" around the holes in the siding. Sometimes, all the "deterrents" accomplished was to move the flicker to a different location, and simply make another hole!

My solution, and the only one I found to work, was to re-side that part of the cabin with vinyl siding. Interestingly, the flickers would only make cavities on the west side of the cabin (suspect it had to do with proper temperature for raising their young and receiving the west sun). Since re-siding, I have had zero flicker problems. I've offered this advice to others in the same cabin area who have had problems with both stucco and real wood siding. And, after re-siding with vinyl, the flickers have moved back to natural cavities.

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: Flicker Damage

Mike Munts <mmunts@...>
 

Brian is correct it I very difficult to completely deter flickers from wood. By changing the siding material they don't seem to recognize that it is material they could penetrate even easier than solid wood in most cases.
 
Don, what I think you are experiencing is a behavior called drumming. Most (if not all) woodpecker species do this.  Drumming typically consists of a series of rapid strike on the sounding object. These are very rapid and individual hits are difficult to distinguish. Flickers especially will seek out metal that will vibrate and help amplify the sound. This is equivalent to singing in songbirds or hooting in owls. Flickers usually aren't too bad if the metal is not too thin. When I was growing up north of Sandpoint we would have Pileated Woodpeckers come in each spring and drum on the stove pipe coming from the wood stove or on the metal siding or roof on my dad' shop. So I can attest to the sound amplification coming from the metal.
Mike
Arco
 

Sent: Friday, December 24, 2010 7:39 PM
Subject: Re: [IBLE] Flicker Damage

 

We have steel siding, so have had no trouble with excessive flickering,  However in the spring our resident Flicker likes to sound the alarm by drumming on the cowling (or whatever it is) at the top of the fireplace vent, some sort of fanfare for the uncommon man.
 
 
Don Hunter
LaBelle (Rigby)
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, December 24, 2010 4:38 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Flicker Damage

 

I have personal experience with this type problem. My damage was to wood cedar-siding on my cabin. I tried all remedies: fake owls, fake snakes and multiple "deterrent agents" around the holes in the siding. Sometimes, all the "deterrents" accomplished was to move the flicker to a different location, and simply make another hole!

My solution, and the only one I found to work, was to re-side that part of the cabin with vinyl siding. Interestingly, the flickers would only make cavities on the west side of the cabin (suspect it had to do with proper temperature for raising their young and receiving the west sun). Since re-siding, I have had zero flicker problems. I've offered this advice to others in the same cabin area who have had problems with both stucco and real wood siding. And, after re-siding with vinyl, the flickers have moved back to natural cavities.

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: Flicker Damage

DONNELL NITA HUNTER <hunterdn@...>
 

We have steel siding, so have had no trouble with excessive flickering,  However in the spring our resident Flicker likes to sound the alarm by drumming on the cowling (or whatever it is) at the top of the fireplace vent, some sort of fanfare for the uncommon man.
 
 
Don Hunter
LaBelle (Rigby)

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, December 24, 2010 4:38 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Flicker Damage

 

I have personal experience with this type problem. My damage was to wood cedar-siding on my cabin. I tried all remedies: fake owls, fake snakes and multiple "deterrent agents" around the holes in the siding. Sometimes, all the "deterrents" accomplished was to move the flicker to a different location, and simply make another hole!

My solution, and the only one I found to work, was to re-side that part of the cabin with vinyl siding. Interestingly, the flickers would only make cavities on the west side of the cabin (suspect it had to do with proper temperature for raising their young and receiving the west sun). Since re-siding, I have had zero flicker problems. I've offered this advice to others in the same cabin area who have had problems with both stucco and real wood siding. And, after re-siding with vinyl, the flickers have moved back to natural cavities.

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Flicker Damage

lcarrigan_55
 

I have personal experience with this type problem. My damage was to wood cedar-siding on my cabin. I tried all remedies: fake owls, fake snakes and multiple "deterrent agents" around the holes in the siding. Sometimes, all the "deterrents" accomplished was to move the flicker to a different location, and simply make another hole!

My solution, and the only one I found to work, was to re-side that part of the cabin with vinyl siding. Interestingly, the flickers would only make cavities on the west side of the cabin (suspect it had to do with proper temperature for raising their young and receiving the west sun). Since re-siding, I have had zero flicker problems. I've offered this advice to others in the same cabin area who have had problems with both stucco and real wood siding. And, after re-siding with vinyl, the flickers have moved back to natural cavities.

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


question for site master

Richard and Ann Rusnak
 

How do I help a friend get on the IBLE list serve? He only has a smart phone, with the email address idahobirdman@gmail.com
Thanks for the help
Rich Rusnak


Re: Flicker Problems -- Advice?

Terry Gray <clgtlg@...>
 

This question comes up often in winter.  See Below:

Flicker Damage Question

 

 

I get asked this question a lot this time of year.  How do you get the

flickers and woodpeckers to quit damaging our cedar siding or roofs?  A

friend of mine said that he has found that if a person takes a non hardning

calk and applies it to the damaged area of siding or roofing covering the

damaged area all the way around the hole that they will quit trying to make

the hole bigger.   He claims that it works.  Sometimes it is hard to reach

the area of damage but it's worth a try.

Terry Gray

 

I have a non-intuitive solution that works at my house. Put up a bunch of

cedar nest boxes. I have 2 or 3 pairs of flickers around the house and in 13

years, have yet to have a hole drilled into my cedar siding. I have,

however, replaced the front panels of my bird boxes on an almost annual

basis. It seems the flickers are content to pound the 1 inch holes up to 3

inches rather than beat on the siding. Then, in the fall, I simply put a new

piece with a 1 inch hole back over the big hole. Eventually, I have to

completely replace the front panel...

Kas Dumroese

 

I have also had this question a lot this time of year.  Cornell has some

great references:

 

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/wp_about/control.html

 

They talk about WHY flickers are choosing their type of siding and different

preventative/control measures.

Cindy McCormack

 

Use a falcon Silhouette cut out of 1" foam hung on fishing line.  The

falcon will "fly around" in the wind and scare off the flickers.

Randy Hill

 

Have, had, the same problem on my home in Nampa. Got a nest box from Bird

House and Habitat in Boise and the flickers moved in and quit banging on my

house. Guess they just wanted a place to call their own.

 

Now I need to cover it up for the summer and evict the Starlings!

Andy Crabtree

 

I also had severe Flicker damage (even with several boxes up) until I

repainted my home a few years ago...apparently Flickers do not like the

taste of a lead based paint...

Michael

 

 

 

 

From: ible@... [mailto:ible@...] On Behalf Of Scott
Sent: Friday, December 24, 2010 1:07 PM
To: ible@...
Subject: [IBLE] Flicker Problems -- Advice?

 

 

Just got a call from a friend that has a flicker putting flikcer sized holes in the stucco of his house. He put up a couple of fake owls today and hopes that would take care of things. But, if it doesn't, anyone out there with experience in this area? How can you get a flicker to "move on along" and leave his house alone?

Scott Tuthill


Birds observed at Spring Valley Reservoir this am

Terry Gray <clgtlg@...>
 

Spring Valley Reservoir is north east of Troy ID which is east of Moscow ID

Location: Spring Valley Reservoir
Observation date: 12/24/10
Notes: Temperatures about 35 degrees F. The Reservoir is frozen over
and many people enjoying being on the ice fish, and cross-country skiing. I
walked a trail around part of the lake and if one gets of the packed trail
the snow depth is waste deep.
Number of species: 11

Ruffed Grouse 1
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Northern Shrike 1
Common Raven 2
Black-capped Chickadee 2
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 2
Red-breasted Nuthatch 4
Winter Wren 2
House Finch 5
Red Crossbill 6
Evening Grosbeak 4

Good Birding!

Terry Gray
890 Stefany Ln
Moscow ID 83843
(208)882-1585
http://www.flickr.com/photos/terryandchristine/


Flicker Problems -- Advice?

Scott Tuthill
 

Just got a call from a friend that has a flicker putting flikcer sized holes in the stucco of his house. He put up a couple of fake owls today and hopes that would take care of things. But, if it doesn't, anyone out there with experience in this area? How can you get a flicker to "move on along" and leave his house alone?

Scott Tuthill


Cassin's Finch at Feeder in Boise

Scott Tuthill
 

Was scanning the birds a bit ago at my feeders in the north end part of Boise and my binoculars stopped on a nice male Cassin's Finch. I am not sure I have ever seen one in Boise in the winter but there was no doubt that is what it was.

Took a quick look and didn't see the specie on the Nampa CBC. Not sure about Boise as RL is still working on getting a list out I think.

Scott Tuthill


Nampa Area CBC Results

Lynn Davenport <sofabird@...>
 

Many thanks to all those hardy birders who braved the snow and gale forced winds to participate in the Nampa Area CBC on the 18th. It was a great, record breaking, day. And a special thanks to Cheryl & Bob and all the others who brought chili, chowder, veggies and desserts for the perfect ending of a perfect day.

Nampa CBC's total numbers were way down. This years total count was 55,051 birds compared to last year's total count of 114,487. But our species count was up to 105 from 92 which sets a record for the Nampa Area CBC.

The Green Heron has over-wintered near Marsing for the third winter and two migrants have graced us by sticking around for the CBC. A Pacific Loon has been observed for the past two weeks near the Upper Dam at Lake Lowell and a Long-tailed duck moved from the Lower Dam to the Snake River. For the past two years an Anna's Hummingbird has been counted. This year it moved to the Marsing area and was observed by one of our Feeder Watchers on Count Day.

Again, Thanks so much to all you hearty & brave birders. It was fun!!

NAMPA AREA CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT # 111
December 18, 2010

1. Common Loon - 1
2. Pacific Loon - 1
3. Pied-billed Grebe - 8
4. Horned Grebe - 2
5. Eared Grebe - 1
6. Western Grebe - 1
7. Great Blue Heron - 14
8. Great Egret - 5
9. Green Heron – 1
10. Black-crowned Night Heron – 7
11.Trumpeter Swan - 1
12. Greater White-fronted Goose - 1
13. Snow Goose - 4
14. Canada Goose, Greater – 12,652
15. Cackling Goose - 14
16. Woodduck - 150
17. Green-winged Teal - 112
18. Mallard – 12,635
19. Northern Pintail - 124
20. Northern Shoveler - 16
21. Gadwall - 369
22. American Wigeon - 913
23. Eurasian Wigeon - 1
24. Canvasback - 1
25. Redhead - 106
26. Ring-necked Duck - 384
27. Lesser Scaup - 151
28. Common Goldeneye - 369
29. Barrows Goldeneye - 2
30. Bufflehead - 139
31. Hooded Merganser - 6
32. Common Merganser - 194
33. Red-breasted Merganser - 17
34. Ruddy Duck - 1
35. Long-tailed Duck - 1
36. Bald Eagle, Adult - 14, Juv. - 5, Total - 19
37. Northern Harrier - 35
38. Sharp-shinned Hawk - 4
39. Coopers Hawk - 4
40. Red-tailed Hawk - 88
41. Rough-ledded Hawk - 4
42. American Kestrel - 149
43. Merlin - 4
44. Peregrine Falcon - 3
45. Prairie Falcon - 3
46. Ring-necked Pheasant - 25
47. Wild Turkey - 50
48. California Quail - 411
49. Virginia Rail - 5
50. American Coot - 489
51. Killdeer - 5
52. Wilson Snipe - 3
53. Ring-billed Gull - 1,793
54. California Gull - 483
55. Herring Gull - 12
56. Thayer's Gull - 2
57. Glaucous-winged Gull - 1
58. Rock Pigeon - 735
59. Mourning Dove - 460
60. Eurasian Collared Dove - 26
61. Great-horned Owl - 1
62. Barn Owl - 2
63. Western Screech Owl - 1
64. Anna's Hummingbird - 1 (Feeder)
65. Belted Kingfisher - 8
66. Downy Woodpecker - 6
67. Northern Flicker - 137
68.Say's Phoebe - 1
69. Northern Shrike - 1
70. Black-billed Magpie - 332
71. American Crow - 4001
72. Common Raven - 18
73. Horned Lark - 122
74. Black-capped Chickadee - 30
75. Mountain Chickadee - 1
76. Red-breasted Nuthatch - 2
77. Marsh Wren - 5
78. Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 6
79. Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1
80. Brown Creeper - 1
81. Townsend's Solitaire - 3
82. American Robin - 1,166
83. Varied Thrush - 2
84. Hermit Thrush - 1
85. European Starling - 11,978
86. American Pipit - 16
87. Cedar Waxwing - 173
88. Yellow-rumped Warbler - 107
89. Orange-crowned Warbler - 3
90. Spotted Towhee - 2
91. Harris Sparrow - 1
92. Tree Sparrow - 4
93. Lincoln Sparrow - 2
94. Savannah Sparrow - 1
95. Song Sparrow - 157
96. White-crowned Sparrow - 591
97. Dark-eyed Junco - 378
98. Red-winged Blackbird - 1,214
99. Western Meadowlark - 97
100. Yellow-headed Blackbird - 1
101. Brewers Blackbird - 123
102. House Finch - 567
103. Pine Siskin - 22
104. American Goldfinch - 125
105. House Sparrow - 694

Total Species Counted - 105
Total Number Counted – 55,051
Number of Counters - 25

Lynn Davenport
Nampa, Idaho
bigbirder@clearwire.net


Northern Goshawk

lcarrigan_55
 

Had an adult Northern Goshawk fly through this afternoon with a mob of magpies following close on its tail.

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot


Re: Yellow Throated Warbler

Jay Carlisle
 

I haven't heard of any sightings of the Northern Parula since Thursday, when it was seen by multiple observers behind the Shilo Inn.
 
Jay


From: joniclapsadle
To: ible@...
Sent: Wed, December 22, 2010 3:23:54 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Yellow Throated Warbler

 

Yesterday I was walking to the Shilo Inn on the greenbelt and heard a bird and there it was the YTW. He was on the side of the Higgens & Rutledge Insurance(?) building picking bugs off the signage. Still have yet to see the Parula...I know some people saw it last Thursday. Has anyone seen it since then?



SW Idaho gull update: Mew, Glaucous-winged, and Western

Jay Carlisle
 

1st, just spoke with Cliff (who's been at CJ Strike this week) and they've been seeing the Western Gull daily @ Jack's Creek through Monday but not the last couple of days.  They spotted a big, dark juvenile gull today flying by the Bruneau Duck Ponds but weren't able to ID it ....  Still hoping we can find it for the Jan. 2 CBC!
 
2nd, today was the last day of 'count week' for the Boise CBC so Heidi & I visited the Hidden Hollow landfill (closed on count day) from 230-320pm to see if we could ID any gulls other than the Herring, Ring-billed, and California we'd seen on Sunday.  After 45 min of picking through 2000+ gulls, nothing different.  Then I lucked into an adult Mew Gull roosting on the slope (see attached; in addition to the dark eyes, smudgy head, and slightly darker mantle, notice the very wide, white 'tertial crescent' - near the base of the primaries - relative to the nearby Ring-bills).  The gulls soon flushed and when they resettled, a 1st-winter Glaucous-winged Gull was in the same general area (pic attached).  Thus, 2 new count-week additions just before the deadline.
 
Thanks again to everyone who braved a wet day Sunday for the Boise CBC!  I'd say we did pretty darn well, especially considering the weather ;-)
 
Merry Christmas!
 
Jay


Yellow Throated Warbler

joniclapsadle
 

Yesterday I was walking to the Shilo Inn on the greenbelt and heard a bird and there it was the YTW. He was on the side of the Higgens & Rutledge Insurance(?) building picking bugs off the signage. Still have yet to see the Parula...I know some people saw it last Thursday. Has anyone seen it since then?


Hagerman Results

Ken and Sarah Harris <sjharris@...>
 

The weather Sunday morning, until about noon was great for watching birds. Since most of us were afoot that was a good thing. In the afternoon however we had to cope with rain-spotted eyepieces, foggy car windows, and windshield wipers. All in all we had a pretty good day. No new species were added to our master list but several unusual species were observed - Mew Gull, Lesser Black-backed Gull, and Long-tailed Duck. A few hangers-on were seen - Eared Grebe and Blue-winged Teal. And there were some notable absences - Red-breasted Nuthatch, Hairy Woodpecker, Pine Siskin, and Wilson's Snipe. Due to the fact that over a third of our count circle was badly burned last summer we observed only 63 horned larks. In 2007, we counted almost 8000.

Species
Number
or cw
Flags

Cackling Goose
8
HC, US,

Canada Goose
4262


Trumpeter Swan
15


Tundra Swan
32


swan sp.
1


Wood Duck
19


Gadwall
480


American Wigeon
187


Mallard
11232


Blue-winged Teal
10
HC, US,

Northern Shoveler
146


Northern Pintail
19


American Green-winged Teal
72


Canvasback
67


Redhead
94


Ring-necked Duck
1218


Greater Scaup
34


Lesser Scaup
1067


Long-tailed Duck
1
US,

Bufflehead
82


Common Goldeneye
1240


Barrow's Goldeneye
1


Hooded Merganser
14


Common Merganser
7


Ruddy Duck
36


Chukar
7


Ring-necked Pheasant
19


California Quail
108


Pied-billed Grebe
14


Eared Grebe
6
US,

Western Grebe
12
HC,

American White Pelican
3


Double-crested Cormorant
162


Great Blue Heron (Blue form)
28


Great Egret
15
HC,

Black-crowned Night-Heron
59


Bald Eagle
9


Northern Harrier
28


Sharp-shinned Hawk
3


Cooper's Hawk
4


Red-tailed Hawk
57


Harlan's Hawk
1


Ferruginous Hawk
6
HC,

Rough-legged Hawk
7


Golden Eagle
3


American Kestrel
56


Merlin
1


Prairie Falcon
4


Virginia Rail
5


Sora
2


American Coot
2593


Killdeer
1


Mew Gull
1
US,

Ring-billed Gull
205


California Gull
37


Herring Gull
7


Lesser Black-backed Gull
1
US,

gull sp.
5


Rock Pigeon
189


Eurasian Collared-Dove
124


Mourning Dove
82


Barn Owl
5


Western Screech-Owl
cw


Great Horned Owl
6


Belted Kingfisher
27


Downy Woodpecker
3


Northern (Red-shafted) Flicker
122


Northern Shrike
6
HC,

Black-billed Magpie
153


Common Raven
71
HC,

Horned Lark
63


Black-capped Chickadee
1


Mountain Chickadee
2


Brown Creeper
1


Rock Wren
2


Canyon Wren
7


Marsh Wren
21


Ruby-crowned Kinglet
6


Townsend's Solitaire
6


American Robin
791


European Starling
2406


Cedar Waxwing
140


Yellow-rumped (Audubon's) Warbler
94
HC,

Song Sparrow
85


White-crowned Sparrow
359


Dark-eyed (Oregon) Junco
188


Dark-eyed (Slate-colored) Junco
9


Red-winged Blackbird
500


Western Meadowlark
15


Brewer's Blackbird
600


Cassin's Finch
8


House Finch
219


American Goldfinch
15


House Sparrow
347


TOTAL INDIVIDUALS
COUNTED
30486


TOTAL SPECIES
REPORTED
90


Birds of Prey area

Denise Hughes
 

Is the birds of prey area in the Boise count circle?  Colleen Sweeney saw a Short eared Owl at Victory and McDermit.

--
Denise Hughes
Caldwell, Idaho

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