Date   

Dry Lakes So. of Nampa

cheryl huizinga
 

Hi Birders, 
When Lynn Davenport called me yesterday afternoon with a report of Dunlins and Bonaparte's Gulls at Dry Lakes,  I decided to brave the chilling wind and head out there this AM.  Found 6 Dunlin on the big pond mudflats with 2 Killdeer and several American Pipits.  There were 2 Bonaparte's Gulls hanging out with Ring-billed Gulls.  The birds were sliding on some of the the thin ice covering the shallow areas.    
On the pond across from the Lake Lowell Lower Dam boat parking lot were numerous Wood Ducks and 4 female Hooded Mergansers with Cormorants and Black-crowned Night Herons.  A cold but nice morning. 
Cheryl Huizinga
Caldwell, ID


Seaplex Website

Elise Faike
 

Hi Iblers,
 
Looks like the link to the scientists studying the sea plastics problem didn't translate in my last post, so please try this website address:
 
 
Elise


Quinn Pond

ajestadt
 

I stopped by Quinn Pond today and saw a Common Loon, 4-5 Western Grebes, 6 Lesser Scaups. One Ruddy Duck was hanging out with the Scaups. Also saw a Pied-billed Grebe, Coots and gulls.

Anne Jestadt
Boise


Re: Discovered: a second breeding season for five migratory songbirds

Mike Munts <mmunts@...>
 

 
Pretty fascinating stuff considering 3 of the 5 species discussed also breed in in Idaho.
 
Mike
Arco

----- Original Message -----
To: Ible ; SIBA
Sent: Tuesday, October 27, 2009 12:06 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Discovered: a second breeding season for five migratory songbirds

 

The following message was posted on BirdChat.

Denise Hughes
Caldwell, ID
idahobirder@hotmail.com

There is nothing in which the birds differ more from man than the way
in which they can build and yet leave a landscape as it was before.
-   Robert Lynd


> >> From: Chuck Hagner <chagner@KALMBACH.COM>
> >> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Discovered: a second breeding season for five
> migratory songbirds
> >> To: BIRDCHAT@LISTSERV.ARIZONA.EDU
> >> Date: Monday, October 26, 2009, 1:12 PM
> >> Hi everyone--

> >> Biologists studying songbirds that breed in North America
> >> and then migrate to Mexico have discovered something totally
> >> unheard of in the New World -- a second breeding season.

> >> Five species -- Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Orchard Oriole,
> >> Hooded Oriole, Yellow-breasted Chat, and Cassin's Vireo --
> >> breed primarily in the United States and Canada. Then they
> >> squeeze in a second breeding season during a stopover in
> >> western Mexico on their southward migration.

> >> A paper describing the discovery has been published i n the
> >> online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of
> >> Sciences. Only the abstract is available to nonmembers, but
> >> Associate Editor Matt Mendenhall has written a detailed
> >> summary for our blog:

> >> Researchers discover a second breeding season for five
> >> migratory songbirds Birder's World Field of View http://is.gd/4CUFH

> >> Chuck Hagner
> >> Editor, Birder's World Magazine
> >> Twitter: @CH_BirdersWorld
> >> www.BirdersWorld.com
> >>
> >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksu.edu/audubon/chatguidelines.html
> >> Archives: http://listserv.arizona.edu/archives/birdchat.html


Re: Discovered: a second breeding season for five migratory songbirds

Susan Lindstedt
 

Holy F*^k!!

--- In ible@yahoogroups.com, Denise Hughes <idahobirder@...> wrote:


The following message was posted on BirdChat.

Denise Hughes
Caldwell, ID
idahobirder@...


There is nothing in which the birds differ more from man than the way
in which they can build and yet leave a landscape as it was before.
- Robert Lynd


From: Chuck Hagner <chagner@...>
Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Discovered: a second breeding season for five
migratory songbirds
To: BIRDCHAT@...
Date: Monday, October 26, 2009, 1:12 PM
Hi everyone--
Biologists studying songbirds that breed in North America
and then migrate to Mexico have discovered something totally
unheard of in the New World -- a second breeding season.
Five species -- Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Orchard Oriole,
Hooded Oriole, Yellow-breasted Chat, and Cassin's Vireo --
breed primarily in the United States and Canada. Then they
squeeze in a second breeding season during a stopover in
western Mexico on their southward migration.
A paper describing the discovery has been published in the
online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences. Only the abstract is available to nonmembers, but
Associate Editor Matt Mendenhall has written a detailed
summary for our blog:

Researchers discover a second breeding season for five
migratory songbirds Birder's World Field of View http://is.gd/4CUFH
Chuck Hagner
Editor, Birder's World Magazine
Twitter: @CH_BirdersWorld
www.BirdersWorld.com

BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksu.edu/audubon/chatguidelines.html
Archives: http://listserv.arizona.edu/archives/birdchat.html


Discovered: a second breeding season for five migratory songbirds

Denise Hughes
 

The following message was posted on BirdChat.

Denise Hughes
Caldwell, ID
idahobirder@...

There is nothing in which the birds differ more from man than the way
in which they can build and yet leave a landscape as it was before.
-   Robert Lynd


> >> From: Chuck Hagner
> >> Subject: [BIRDCHAT] Discovered: a second breeding season for five
> migratory songbirds
> >> To: BIRDCHAT@...
> >> Date: Monday, October 26, 2009, 1:12 PM
> >> Hi everyone--

> >> Biologists studying songbirds that breed in North America
> >> and then migrate to Mexico have discovered something totally
> >> unheard of in the New World -- a second breeding season.

> >> Five species -- Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Orchard Oriole,
> >> Hooded Oriole, Yellow-breasted Chat, and Cassin's Vireo --
> >> breed primarily in the United States and Canada. Then they
> >> squeeze in a second breeding season during a stopover in
> >> western Mexico on their southward migration.

> >> A paper describing the discovery has been published in the
> >> online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of
> >> Sciences. Only the abstract is available to nonmembers, but
> >> Associate Editor Matt Mendenhall has written a detailed
> >> summary for our blog:

> >> Researchers discover a second breeding season for five
> >> migratory songbirds Birder's World Field of View http://is.gd/4CUFH

> >> Chuck Hagner
> >> Editor, Birder's World Magazine
> >> Twitter: @CH_BirdersWorld
> >> www.BirdersWorld.com
> >>
> >> BirdChat Guidelines: http://www.ksu.edu/audubon/chatguidelines.html
> >> Archives: http://listserv.arizona.edu/archives/birdchat.html


FW: SF Snake R bald eagle

Bud Alford
 

Floated down SF Snake River Friday in Swan Valley & met an adult bald eagle up close, and “caught” his picture as I drifted under.  Love the eyes.  I think he was more concerned about me floating through his fishing hole.

Bud Alford, Idaho Falls

<<...>> <<...>>


Boise River

bike4birds
 

We managed to get our bike ride completed before the weather turned sour and we were rewarded with an OSPREY just downstream from Main St. I think this is the latest I've seen one on the river. Quinns Pond had Buffleheads again, as well as Western Grebes, and there was a Hooded Merganser across from Joe's Crab Shack. Tom McCabe, Boise


Idaho Birder: Jim Holcomb

rkmorten <robert.mortensen@...>
 

Today's Idaho Birder profile features Jim Holcomb of Nampa.  Read all about him at the Avimor Birding Blog .  

Happy Birding!

Robert Mortensen


Re: River Birds

Steve <tntbutters@...>
 

I also was at Gem lake only this would be a late post from Saturday and there were indeed 4 Horned grebes along with the one Red-necked Grebe, Western Grebes and one Eared grebe. In addition I also found Redheads, and a couple of Ruddy Ducks to add to Jake"s findings.

Steve Butterworth
Idaho Falls

--- In ible@yahoogroups.com, "anatidae7" <harlequin_duck@...> wrote:

Today I did a little wandering around the Snake River here in IF. I first went to Gem Lake, and saw the following:

Western Grebe
Eared Grebe
Red-necked Grebe
Bufflehead
Canada Goose
Mallard
Lesser Scaup
Common Loon
Ring-billed Gull

I also believe there was at least one Horned grebe in the area, but while trying to get a better look at it, a boat came whizzing by and I lost it. All of the different Grebes seemed to stick in small groups of their own kind but would occasionally float close to eachother. Also, I checked out there last night and had a pair of Canvasbacks.

Down by the Greenbelt and the Falls, I located:

Tundra Swan
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Mallard
Ring-billed Gull
Canada Goose


It was nice to get out see some birds.

I'll hopefully get the Bonneville List caught up this week. Thanks to all who have reported sightings, and feel free to report any others.

Jacob Briggs
Idaho Falls
harlequin_duck@...


River Birds

anatidae7
 

Today I did a little wandering around the Snake River here in IF. I first went to Gem Lake, and saw the following:

Western Grebe
Eared Grebe
Red-necked Grebe
Bufflehead
Canada Goose
Mallard
Lesser Scaup
Common Loon
Ring-billed Gull

I also believe there was at least one Horned grebe in the area, but while trying to get a better look at it, a boat came whizzing by and I lost it. All of the different Grebes seemed to stick in small groups of their own kind but would occasionally float close to eachother. Also, I checked out there last night and had a pair of Canvasbacks.

Down by the Greenbelt and the Falls, I located:

Tundra Swan
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Mallard
Ring-billed Gull
Canada Goose


It was nice to get out see some birds.

I'll hopefully get the Bonneville List caught up this week. Thanks to all who have reported sightings, and feel free to report any others.

Jacob Briggs
Idaho Falls
harlequin_duck@hotmail.com


Re: another late bluebird

missingmagpies
 

I saw a Mountain Bluebird on the drive up to Lucky Peak yesterday. It was on a fence near a bluebird box in a saddle, about 3/4 way up.

Jody

--- In ible@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Munts" <mmunts@...> wrote:

Yesterday afternoon I had at least two Mountain Bluebirds near the campground at Craters of the Moon. This is a new record for the last date recorded at Craters.

Mike Munts
Arco


Biking the Boise River

bike4birds
 

Our daily bike rides became very un-birdy for a while, but things have picked up in the last week. We've seen Hooded Mergansers in 3 different places from just downstream of the Main St. Bridge to just upstream of the Broadway Bridge. Western Grebes have been present every day either in the river or on Quinns/Clocktower Pond. Wood Ducks are showing up again and a small raft of Buffleheads were on the pond the other day with the grebes. Cedar Waxwings have been hanging out near Veterans Memorial Parkway. We've also seen our first Merlin of the Fall, a very dark bird, with a light band at the tip of the tail, and there was a doe hanging out in the brushy side channel near the Lander St. STP. Now we're just waiting for the Bald Eagles to return. Let's hope construction of the "Water Park" doesn't scare them away, but I'm not optimistic. Tom McCabe, Boise


Plastics

Elise Faike
 

Hi Iblers,
 
This is from my sister who lives in San Francisco. Garbage from inland continental areas can make it out to the oceans and become part of the plastics problem. There are scientists attempting to figure out what to do about it.

This is why we are so diligent in recycling around here. Check out this article.
 


Kootenai County Big Year - one more

Shirley Sturts
 

!!! One more

#190 White-throated Sparrow - Loch Haven, Hayden - Doug Ward

Shirley Sturts
Coeur d'Alene, ID


Kootenai and Benwah County Big Year Update

Shirley Sturts
 

Benewah County

#:121 Belted Kingfisher - St. Maries - Donni Moen

Kootenai County
#:187 Surf Scoter (3) Hayden Lake - Oct. 16 - Lisa Hardy
and later on Oct. 22 - Dour Ware - still there as of Oct. 24 CDA Audubon field trip
#: 188 Red-throated Loon (1) Hayden Lake - Oct. 16 - Lisa Hardy and again Oct. 22 Doug Ward
(RBR and field notes submitted by Lisa and Doug to the Idaho Bird Records Committee)
#189 Peregrine Falcon - Schlepp Farm (Rose Lake area) - Oct. 24 - Lisa Hardy

Shirley Sturts
Coeur d'Alene, ID


Fw: new way of seeing plastic

Steve Bouffard
 

I visited Midway last holiday season to count albatross nests and have several similar pictures.  I also have pictures of huge mounds of plastic and glass garbage that has floated onto the islands.  The adults evolved thinking anything that floats and is small enough to eat, is food.  If they can swallow it, they feed it to their young.  The adults can regurgitate.  The regurgitation reflex develops later in the young.  Once their digestive tract becomes impacted they die, by the hundreds.  The refuge staff estimated that the adults import some 5 tons of small plastic items to the islands every year as they feed their young.  It is not possible to walk 5-6 feet in any direction on the islands without encountering one or more cigarette lighters.  They also estimated another 10-20 tons of larger plastic & glass items float into the islands every year. I have given several talks on my experience and always leave the message to use alternatives other than plastic, to recycle what plastic you must use, and do not litter.  By littering, you could be responsible for killing sea birds, turtles, and mammals for the next 500+ years - that's a terrible legacy to leave behind!
 
PS: We're talking lots of birds on Midway.  In 2008-09 season we counted over 500.000 albatross nests - and that's not counting the other 15-16 pelagic species that nest there.

Steve Bouffard
2219 Colorado Ave
Boise, ID 83706

sh_bouffard@...


--- On Sat, 10/24/09, monty.thomson wrote:

From: monty.thomson
Subject: [IBLE] new way of seeing plastic
To: ible@...
Date: Saturday, October 24, 2009, 6:00 PM

 
we all need to do something about this.
caution, some images are graphic.
http://www.chrisjor dan.com/current_ set2.php? id=11



Re: new way of seeing plastic

Richard and Ann Rusnak
 

Greetings IBLE, 
This is just the tip of the iceberg. Please read the essay by SUSAN CASEY, "PLASIC OCEAN" which can be found in "The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2007" or from magazine Best Life.
The photos are a staggering "macro" symptom of the ocean's infestation. Every piece of plastic ever made still exists. So, the more insideous symptom of the "undecayable" plastics molecule is in its ability to remain virtually unaltered down to a molecular level. IE. around the world microscopic pieces of intact plastics can now be found in the digestive tacts of  zooplankton. Which is working its way back up the food web to us, the apex predators. I hope you get something from this amazing story.
Sorry for the rant, Happy Birding.
Rich Rusnak, Nampa

On Sat, Oct 24, 2009 at 12:00 PM, monty.thomson <monty.thomson@...> wrote:
 

we all need to do something about this.
caution, some images are graphic.
http://www.chrisjordan.com/current_set2.php?id=11



Christmas Bird Counts

Denise Hughes
 

I know the southwest bird count dates have been set but I don't remember what the dates are.  Can someone please send me the dates for the local CBCs.  Thanks.

Denise Hughes
Caldwell, ID
idahobirder@...

 

 

 

There is nothing in which the birds differ more from man than the way
in which they can build and yet leave a landscape as it was before.
-   Robert Lynd





Mann Lake Birds October 24, 2009

Terry Gray <clgtlg@...>
 

Hi everyone,

Seven of us bird the morning at Mann Lake.

Location: Mann Lake
Observation date: 10/24/09
Number of species: 45

Canada Goose 130
Mallard 1703
Northern Shoveler 3
Northern Pintail 8
Green-winged Teal 66
Canvasback 6
Lesser Scaup 1
Bufflehead 24
Common Merganser 10
Ruddy Duck 3
Ring-necked Pheasant 12
Horned Grebe 1
Eared Grebe 1
Western Grebe 26
Double-crested Cormorant 28
Great Blue Heron 1
Bald Eagle 1
Northern Harrier 1
Red-tailed Hawk 2
American Coot 38
Killdeer 3
Pectoral Sandpiper 3
Long-billed Dowitcher 4
Ring-billed Gull 5
California Gull 1
Herring Gull 1
Rock Pigeon 1
Mourning Dove 3
Short-eared Owl 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Northern Flicker 1
Black-billed Magpie 3
American Crow 5
Common Raven 1
Bewick's Wren 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
European Starling 12
American Pipit 2
Cedar Waxwing 5
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Song Sparrow 3
White-crowned Sparrow 5
Dark-eyed Junco 8
American Goldfinch 6
House Sparrow 8

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)

Good Birding!

Terry Gray
890 Stefany Ln
Moscow ID 83843
(208)882-1585
http://www.flickr.com/photos/terryandchristine/

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