Date   

River Birds

anatidae7
 

Today I did a little wandering around the Snake River here in IF. I first went to Gem Lake, and saw the following:

Western Grebe
Eared Grebe
Red-necked Grebe
Bufflehead
Canada Goose
Mallard
Lesser Scaup
Common Loon
Ring-billed Gull

I also believe there was at least one Horned grebe in the area, but while trying to get a better look at it, a boat came whizzing by and I lost it. All of the different Grebes seemed to stick in small groups of their own kind but would occasionally float close to eachother. Also, I checked out there last night and had a pair of Canvasbacks.

Down by the Greenbelt and the Falls, I located:

Tundra Swan
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Mallard
Ring-billed Gull
Canada Goose


It was nice to get out see some birds.

I'll hopefully get the Bonneville List caught up this week. Thanks to all who have reported sightings, and feel free to report any others.

Jacob Briggs
Idaho Falls
harlequin_duck@hotmail.com


Re: another late bluebird

missingmagpies
 

I saw a Mountain Bluebird on the drive up to Lucky Peak yesterday. It was on a fence near a bluebird box in a saddle, about 3/4 way up.

Jody

--- In ible@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Munts" <mmunts@...> wrote:

Yesterday afternoon I had at least two Mountain Bluebirds near the campground at Craters of the Moon. This is a new record for the last date recorded at Craters.

Mike Munts
Arco


Biking the Boise River

bike4birds
 

Our daily bike rides became very un-birdy for a while, but things have picked up in the last week. We've seen Hooded Mergansers in 3 different places from just downstream of the Main St. Bridge to just upstream of the Broadway Bridge. Western Grebes have been present every day either in the river or on Quinns/Clocktower Pond. Wood Ducks are showing up again and a small raft of Buffleheads were on the pond the other day with the grebes. Cedar Waxwings have been hanging out near Veterans Memorial Parkway. We've also seen our first Merlin of the Fall, a very dark bird, with a light band at the tip of the tail, and there was a doe hanging out in the brushy side channel near the Lander St. STP. Now we're just waiting for the Bald Eagles to return. Let's hope construction of the "Water Park" doesn't scare them away, but I'm not optimistic. Tom McCabe, Boise


Plastics

Elise Faike
 

Hi Iblers,
 
This is from my sister who lives in San Francisco. Garbage from inland continental areas can make it out to the oceans and become part of the plastics problem. There are scientists attempting to figure out what to do about it.

This is why we are so diligent in recycling around here. Check out this article.
 


Kootenai County Big Year - one more

Shirley Sturts
 

!!! One more

#190 White-throated Sparrow - Loch Haven, Hayden - Doug Ward

Shirley Sturts
Coeur d'Alene, ID


Kootenai and Benwah County Big Year Update

Shirley Sturts
 

Benewah County

#:121 Belted Kingfisher - St. Maries - Donni Moen

Kootenai County
#:187 Surf Scoter (3) Hayden Lake - Oct. 16 - Lisa Hardy
and later on Oct. 22 - Dour Ware - still there as of Oct. 24 CDA Audubon field trip
#: 188 Red-throated Loon (1) Hayden Lake - Oct. 16 - Lisa Hardy and again Oct. 22 Doug Ward
(RBR and field notes submitted by Lisa and Doug to the Idaho Bird Records Committee)
#189 Peregrine Falcon - Schlepp Farm (Rose Lake area) - Oct. 24 - Lisa Hardy

Shirley Sturts
Coeur d'Alene, ID


Fw: new way of seeing plastic

Steve Bouffard
 

I visited Midway last holiday season to count albatross nests and have several similar pictures.  I also have pictures of huge mounds of plastic and glass garbage that has floated onto the islands.  The adults evolved thinking anything that floats and is small enough to eat, is food.  If they can swallow it, they feed it to their young.  The adults can regurgitate.  The regurgitation reflex develops later in the young.  Once their digestive tract becomes impacted they die, by the hundreds.  The refuge staff estimated that the adults import some 5 tons of small plastic items to the islands every year as they feed their young.  It is not possible to walk 5-6 feet in any direction on the islands without encountering one or more cigarette lighters.  They also estimated another 10-20 tons of larger plastic & glass items float into the islands every year. I have given several talks on my experience and always leave the message to use alternatives other than plastic, to recycle what plastic you must use, and do not litter.  By littering, you could be responsible for killing sea birds, turtles, and mammals for the next 500+ years - that's a terrible legacy to leave behind!
 
PS: We're talking lots of birds on Midway.  In 2008-09 season we counted over 500.000 albatross nests - and that's not counting the other 15-16 pelagic species that nest there.

Steve Bouffard
2219 Colorado Ave
Boise, ID 83706

sh_bouffard@...


--- On Sat, 10/24/09, monty.thomson wrote:

From: monty.thomson
Subject: [IBLE] new way of seeing plastic
To: ible@...
Date: Saturday, October 24, 2009, 6:00 PM

 
we all need to do something about this.
caution, some images are graphic.
http://www.chrisjor dan.com/current_ set2.php? id=11



Re: new way of seeing plastic

Richard and Ann Rusnak
 

Greetings IBLE, 
This is just the tip of the iceberg. Please read the essay by SUSAN CASEY, "PLASIC OCEAN" which can be found in "The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2007" or from magazine Best Life.
The photos are a staggering "macro" symptom of the ocean's infestation. Every piece of plastic ever made still exists. So, the more insideous symptom of the "undecayable" plastics molecule is in its ability to remain virtually unaltered down to a molecular level. IE. around the world microscopic pieces of intact plastics can now be found in the digestive tacts of  zooplankton. Which is working its way back up the food web to us, the apex predators. I hope you get something from this amazing story.
Sorry for the rant, Happy Birding.
Rich Rusnak, Nampa

On Sat, Oct 24, 2009 at 12:00 PM, monty.thomson <monty.thomson@...> wrote:
 

we all need to do something about this.
caution, some images are graphic.
http://www.chrisjordan.com/current_set2.php?id=11



Christmas Bird Counts

Denise Hughes
 

I know the southwest bird count dates have been set but I don't remember what the dates are.  Can someone please send me the dates for the local CBCs.  Thanks.

Denise Hughes
Caldwell, ID
idahobirder@...

 

 

 

There is nothing in which the birds differ more from man than the way
in which they can build and yet leave a landscape as it was before.
-   Robert Lynd





Mann Lake Birds October 24, 2009

Terry Gray <clgtlg@...>
 

Hi everyone,

Seven of us bird the morning at Mann Lake.

Location: Mann Lake
Observation date: 10/24/09
Number of species: 45

Canada Goose 130
Mallard 1703
Northern Shoveler 3
Northern Pintail 8
Green-winged Teal 66
Canvasback 6
Lesser Scaup 1
Bufflehead 24
Common Merganser 10
Ruddy Duck 3
Ring-necked Pheasant 12
Horned Grebe 1
Eared Grebe 1
Western Grebe 26
Double-crested Cormorant 28
Great Blue Heron 1
Bald Eagle 1
Northern Harrier 1
Red-tailed Hawk 2
American Coot 38
Killdeer 3
Pectoral Sandpiper 3
Long-billed Dowitcher 4
Ring-billed Gull 5
California Gull 1
Herring Gull 1
Rock Pigeon 1
Mourning Dove 3
Short-eared Owl 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Northern Flicker 1
Black-billed Magpie 3
American Crow 5
Common Raven 1
Bewick's Wren 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
European Starling 12
American Pipit 2
Cedar Waxwing 5
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Song Sparrow 3
White-crowned Sparrow 5
Dark-eyed Junco 8
American Goldfinch 6
House Sparrow 8

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)

Good Birding!

Terry Gray
890 Stefany Ln
Moscow ID 83843
(208)882-1585
http://www.flickr.com/photos/terryandchristine/


another late bluebird

Mike Munts <mmunts@...>
 

Yesterday afternoon I had at least two Mountain Bluebirds near the campground at Craters of the Moon. This is a new record for the last date recorded at Craters.
 
Mike Munts
Arco


new way of seeing plastic

monty.thomson
 

we all need to do something about this.
caution, some images are graphic.
http://www.chrisjordan.com/current_set2.php?id=11


hummingbird near robie creek

monty.thomson
 

got a call at the store today from dave perez. he reported that he had a hummer still visiting his feeder and was kind enough to allow me to share his name and general location. he lives on Hummingbird Haven road (no kidding). which is located adjacent to robie creek. he did not say what kind of hummer it was.


Idaho Falls Area birding

Steve <tntbutters@...>
 

After seeing that Mike Munts had found his first Rough-legged Hawk of the year this week I went out West of Idaho Falls to do the same. Just West of Idaho Falls by Noise Park I found a Juvenile Golden Eagle and a number of Harriers and Red-Tailed hawk. I proceded down Croft Road Heading North finding more Red-tails one Praire Falcon, a few Kestrels but still no Rough-legged. At the end of Croft Road turning West until that road ends I headed north again finding flocks of American Pipets, and a Ferruginous Hawk. I continued North to Mud lake finding more Harriers and Red-tails. I then proceded East to I-15 and turned back South to head to Idaho Falls and just off the Freeway next to Market Lake was a Rough-legged Hawk flying overhead. It took a while and a few miles but success was the reward.

Steve Butterworth
Idaho Falls


Re: Anna's Hummingbird in WY

cheryl huizinga
 

We still have an immature female Anna's Hummingbird coming to our feeder So. of Caldwell, ID.  It hasn't been giving me very long looks, but there's no doubt now about it being an Anna's.  Bronzey green back with some green on the flanks.  Tail is just slightly longer than the wing tips with a very slight down-curve to the bill.  It's been coming in very regularly for over two weeks now.  I'm keeping the feeder out overnight since it hasn't been freezing at night.  I figure it will head out south when it feels the time is right.  Until then I'll continue with the feeder.
Cheryl Huizinga
Caldwell, ID

----- Original Message -----
From: susanpatla
Sent: Monday, October 19, 2009 10:46 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Anna's Hummingbird in WY

 

Tonight I observed an Anna's Hummingbird at a feeder south of Jackson, WY. It has been around for about a month it turns out. Showed up in immature plumage but it is a male and is now developing full red crown and head.

Question for you all: should the home owner keep feeding this bird or not? I advised her to take the bird feeder in at night so it does not get too cold but am not sure what the best strategy would be to keep the bird alive. It appeared to be in excellent condition. All the local hummers had departed by mid September. I would appreciate any feedback on this matter. Thanks, Susan Teton County WY


Re: Birding North of I.F. and some Craters stuff

Mike Munts <mmunts@...>
 

I was just thinking the same thing about the blackbirds. I also saw a Yellow-headed at Carey WMA yesterday. Also, had my first Rough-legged Hawk of the season at Craters of the Moon today.
 
Also the Clark's Nutcrackers are starting to sing. Most birders are familiar with their call which is given year-round but few with the song. If you have nutcrackers in the area listen for a serious of notes that are often described as a metallic chirp. In experience they will only do it for a few weeks in early winter as they are establishing pair bonds for the upcoming breeding season. Which is mid-winter.
 
Mike Munts
Arco
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2009 4:42 PM
Subject: [IBLE] Birding North of I.F.

 

Last Friday morning I went birding north of Idaho Falls with Kit Struthers and we both thought that it might be of interest to others that in Fremont Co. we saw one male Yellow-headed Blackbird by the Roberts slough and we also saw four Sandhill Cranes near there soaring over-head. We both thought that it was a bit late to be seeing either of these species.

From this same spot we saw nine Trumpeter Swans headed south.

We had a very enjoyable outing and at Market Lake in the northwest tree line we saw two Great Horned Owls, a Hermit Thrush, some Yellow-rumped Warblers, White-crowned Sparrows, Juncos, and Ruby-crowned Kinglets (lots of them), Northern Flickers, and many Magpies. There is a Trumpeter Swan at Market Lake with a Green Collar #RO5 and it has been verified that it was banded at Harriman.

On the 15th on my drive over to I.F. I saw about fifteen Trumpeter Swans on Carey Lake.

Kathleen Cameron
Bellevue, ID


Birding North of I.F.

cameronkathleena
 

Last Friday morning I went birding north of Idaho Falls with Kit Struthers and we both thought that it might be of interest to others that in Fremont Co. we saw one male Yellow-headed Blackbird by the Roberts slough and we also saw four Sandhill Cranes near there soaring over-head. We both thought that it was a bit late to be seeing either of these species.

From this same spot we saw nine Trumpeter Swans headed south.

We had a very enjoyable outing and at Market Lake in the northwest tree line we saw two Great Horned Owls, a Hermit Thrush, some Yellow-rumped Warblers, White-crowned Sparrows, Juncos, and Ruby-crowned Kinglets (lots of them), Northern Flickers, and many Magpies. There is a Trumpeter Swan at Market Lake with a Green Collar #RO5 and it has been verified that it was banded at Harriman.

On the 15th on my drive over to I.F. I saw about fifteen Trumpeter Swans on Carey Lake.

Kathleen Cameron
Bellevue, ID


Snow Geese at Black's Creek Reservoir

Leanne Lloyd-Fairey
 

This morning at Black's Creek reservoir in SW Idaho, we found 1 adult and 3 juvenile Snow Geese.

A Northern Harrier flyby spooked up a number of shorebirds, but ID was impossible with binoculars.

Leanne Lloyd-Fairey
Boise


Camas NWR

LindaMilam1@...
 

I made a quick trip to Camas NWR yesterday morning, circling the Big Pond for about an hour. Though the sun was burning through the clouds in IF, it was misty at Camas.  
 
The pond is full of ducks: 1000's of Mallards and a few others including some northern pintails, my favorites, and a few common goldeneyes.  Also at least a 1000 Canada Geese and a hundred or more sandhill cranes.  There were a few late yellow-headed blackbirds, as well as a few red-tailed hawks and rough-legged hawks. 
 
As I came back to the entrance road after circling the pond, there were 3 dozen snow geese, including about a dozen immatures.
 
(Camas NWR is about 40 miles from Idaho Falls.  Take I-15 north of IF about 30 miles, take the Hamer exit and follow the signs.  There is an office though the staff are often in the field.)
 
(On a recent visit to Kauai, I visited the Kilauea NWR and bought one of the new Blue Goose Passports....I may regret this!  All of the NWRs are listed, by state, and the various refuges have ink stamps that can be entered.....much like the National Parks Passports.  I counted up the refuges I have already visited, 107, and guess I am about to start all over again!  Silly?  Yes.  Fun?  Yes.  Good excuse to go back?  As if I needed one!) 


Camas County Update

Betty <bettyplusbob@...>
 

49. Trumpeter swan, Oct 16, Spring Creek Reservoir, Bob & Betty Davenport

50. American Wigeon, Oct 16, Spring Creek Reservoir, Bob & Betty Davenport

51. Ring-necked Duck, Oct 16, Spring Creek Reservoir, Bob & Betty Davenport

52. Western Grebe, Oct 16, Spring Creek Reservoir, Bob & Betty Davenport



--
Can't Never Could Do Anything.

http://photobucket.com/albums/f218/1950Betty/

Betty, Bob Davenport & Kato
Meridian, ID

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