Date   
Served Agencies

Eric Grabowski
 

> Since our only served agency on the island is HCCDA, we’d like them to be included in the exercise.

Although HCCDA is the primary agency we have worked with in the past, I don't agree that it's the only agency we should serve. Shouldn't we figure out ways to support other organizations on the Big Island like the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, Big Island Volunteer Organizations Active in Disaster, Medical Reserve Corps, National Weather Service (SKYWARN), local hospitals, and possibly others?

In other communities where I've lived there were amateur radio operators who were dedicated to individual groups. After a few tornadoes and floods, we learned this strategy was flawed on several levels. The aha moment came when two amateur radio teams were dispatched to the same fire station that was being used as a staging area and field commend post. Setting up two field stations equipped with HF and VHF radios was redundant and a waste of valuable communication assets, plus they interfered with each other. The only reason two separate stations were required was because the two served agencies had privacy restrictions so Hams representing one group could not share information with the Hams in the other group without violating their agency's rules. After that event, we changed our strategy.

Here on the Big Island we don't have enough amateur radio operators trained in emergency communication operations to be able to segregate them by agency; and, there really is no valid reason to do so. I've operated from several field stations since 1969 and can say with confidence that our operators were never so busy passing traffic for one served agency that they didn't have time to pass traffic for any others. Each field team frequently supported county civil defense, red cross, and the weather service without feeling overloaded.

73 and aloha, Eric KH6CQ

Re: Group Name

April K. Lee, Broker, BA, CCIM, ABR, E-Pro
 

Even though it’s a little long, I really like it👌🏾❗️Great activists in Service to All❗️I am recharged in the Spirit & less fearful about what I intuitively perceive happening in the future💙🌏💠 MAHALO!

April K. Lee, Broker RB-19294, BA, CCIM, ABR, E-Pro
Kohala Real Estate & 2nd Home Services
In beautiful Hawi, Hawai’i
Cell: 808-989-5995
 

On Feb 3, 2019, at 11:24 AM, Eric Grabowski via Groups.Io <ejgrabowski@...> wrote:

> We need a name for the group, as well as the exercise, that doesn’t allow it to be confused with ACS-managed or ARES-managed plans.  Perhaps the reflector that we use should also differentiate us from the other organizations.

Having a new name for this group sounds like a great idea. I think it would go a long way toward mitigating the issues of territorial identity.

Since we're all about using amateur radio for providing information about catastrophic events to served agencies as well as other Hams, I would like to propose the name RADIO --- Radio Amateur Disaster Information Operators.

73 and aloha, Eric KH6CQ

reflector

Norm
 

Hi all,

Steve WH7TW is preparing minutes of Groundhog Day Emcomm forum.
Jim Sugg AH6AE is preparing a video of same.
ETA: 2/30/2019 ;)

Aloha, Norm, NH7UA


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Ceridwen Sanders <cerisanders@...>
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2019 18:56:25 -1000
Subject: reflector
To: Norm Cohler <@nh7ua>

After the questions this evening, and I’ve had some in email, we
should put the info up letting people know that the minutes and video
are coming. Are you willing to do it?

Ceridwen Sanders AH6CS
cerisanders@...
Richard Bowen AH6RK
rickbowen.pc@...
PO Box 138
43-1781 Manienie Road
Paauilo, HI 96776
808-938-9012
808-657-8626




--


--
Aloha, Norm, NH7UA

Re: EmComm discussions going forward after Hamfest roundtable

Leslie Hittner
 

Ceri,
 
I formatted my comments as a pdf file, but the website will not accept it.
 
-Les
 
 

From: Ceridwen Sanders
Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2019 10:52
To: HiCoAres@groups.io
Subject: [HiCoAres] EmComm discussions going forward after Hamfest roundtable
 
After a very energetic, positive, and well-attended roundtable at Hamfest on Sat. Feb. 2, suggestions from the more than 25 participants are beginning to be sorted and posted.
 
Eric KH6CQ:  I would suggest that we use the message subject line to qualify comments to a single subject
 
Steve WH7TW: I went ahead and made a folder in https://groups.io/g/HiCoAres/files/EMCOMM_Roundtable. Also I have a raw audio of the meeting, 26MB in size.  It's a bit faint in spots but not too bad.   I should be able to email it, if anyone is interested.  It's a .3gp file, which seems to play just find in Windows Media player (much to my surprise). 
 
Other suggestions:
 
> Schedule a Big Island emergency radio exercise soon so that hams can start preparing
 
> Since our only served agency on the island is HCCDA, we’d like them to be included in the exercise
 
> We need a name for the group, as well as the exercise, that doesn’t allow it to be confused with ACS-managed or ARES-managed plans.  Perhaps the reflector that we use should also differentiate us from the other organizations.
 
> Some of the attendees aren’t on the reflector that we’re using to post.  How do we include those attending as well as other interested hams who weren’t able to be at the meeting?
 
Any other suggestions can be posted directly to the reflector:
 
  • Subscribe: HiCoAres+subscribe@groups.io
  • Post: HiCoAres@groups.io
Thanks, Ceri AH6CS

Re: EmComm discussions going forward after Hamfest roundtable

Norm
 

Hi Les,
Thanks for trying. I just successfully tested uploading to the Files section a test pdf file. See Names180408a.pdf.
Please keep trying, perhaps with an rtf format. Thanks.

Aloha, Norm, NH7UA

Re: EmComm discussions going forward after Hamfest roundtable

Norm
 


Hi Les,

I forgot. The Files folder I used for the test was Files/ SET 2018 practice. Many other rtf files have been uploaded ok.

Aloha, Norm, NH7UA

Notes from Discussion

Leslie Hittner
 

Attached is a scan of my notes from Last week’s discussion at the hamfest.
 
-Les, K0BAD

Today's ARES announcement

Ceridwen Sanders
 

 

New Plan Aligns ARES with the Needs of Served Agencies

02/19/2019

The new ARES Plan adopted by the ARRL Board of Directors at its Annual Meeting in January represents an effort to provide ARES with a clearly defined mission, goals, and objectives; specific training requirements, and a system for consistent reporting and record-keeping. The Board’s Public Service Enhancement Working Group (PSEWG) spent more than 3 years crafting the ARES Plan which, ARRL officials believe, provides a much-needed update of the program’s role in public service and emergency preparedness in the 21st century. Concerns focused on bringing ARES into alignment with the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS), and creating more consistent and standardized ARES training requirements. Given dramatic changes and upgrades in national, regional, and local emergency and disaster response organizations, ARRL faced a major challenge, said ARRL Great Lakes Division Director Dale Williams, WA8EFK, who chaired the PSEWG. 

 

“If we didn’t address these issues, such as training standards and organizational management, ARES faced the very real possibility that it would no longer be viewed as a valid and valuable partner in emergency and disaster relief situations,” Williams said.

 

With input from ARES members and a peer review team, and the assistance of emergency response officials with some partner organizations, the PSEWG came up with a plan that provides guidelines to ensure that ARES remains a service of organized, trained, qualified, and credentialed Amateur Radio volunteers who can provide public service partners with radio communication expertise, capability, and capacity, Williams added.

 

A drafted ARES Plan was circulated among ARRL Section Managers (SMs) and Section Emergency Coordinators (ECs) to gather feedback. During the comment period from August through October 2018, the PSEWG heard from 55 ARRL Sections, representing 40 states — more than 125 pages of feedback in all. The PSEWG expressed appreciation to all who submitted comments and ideas. 

 

The PSEWG reviewed every comment and suggestion, identifying about a dozen key items commonly cited by those in the Field Organization to improve the plan.

 

Based on input from ARES participants, the training requirements in the final ARES Plan consist of the free FEMA Professional Development Series. The series comprises these independent study (IS) courses: 120.c, 230.d, 235.c, 240.d, 241.b, 242.b, and 244.b (as they may be amended), as well as the ARRL’s EC-001 and EC-016 emergency communication courses. As part of adopting the ARES Plan, the ARRL Board approved a proposal to make the ARRL EC courses free for ARES members.

 

The plan highlights some additional training programs that ARES participants are encouraged to consider taking, but that are not required, such as AUXCOMM and training courses like ICS-300 and ICS-400.

 

The ARES Plan outlines a three-tiered membership structure based on increased responsibility levels and accompanying training requirements. Although the tiers are not a required path, they serve to define three distinct ways to participate in the ARES program; it’s up to the participant to determine his or her level of involvement. 

 

The ARES Plan points out that public service events such as parades and marathons are within the realm of ARES activity and are, in fact, a key part of it, because such events are an integral part of effective training.

 

In recognizing the local and regional nature of emergency communication needs in disaster response activations, the Plan notes that training requirements are ultimately the responsibility of the Section Manager, with each SM approving training for local ARES teams, as local conditions and needs dictate.

 

The ARES Plan also highlights the relationship between ARES and the National Traffic System (NTS). The PSEWG indicated that it will continue moving forward with efforts to find ways to refine and strengthen that relationship.

 

While the intent of the ARES Plan is to align the ARES organizational structure with the NIMS and ICS systems, Williams noted that, within the ARES structure, the Emergency Coordinator (EC) will continue to lead the ARES team locally during an incident, while the District and Section Emergency Coordinators will continue to serve as resources and support for the EC. (The emergency preparedness staff at ARRL is in the process of updating the EC manual.) The ARES Plan stresses that ARES participants are not first responders, and it encourages ARES leaders to develop and grow their group’s partnerships with state emergency management agencies and officials. Williams said the adoption of the ARES Plan is not the end of this process.

 

“ARES cannot remain stagnant only to be updated once every few generations,” he said. “The ARES Plan, and the ARES program, must be able to evolve.” Williams added that the ARRL Headquarters emergency preparedness staff will review the program annually to ensure its continued relevance.    

 

Re: Today's ARES announcement

Eric Grabowski
 

Thanks. As I stated in my previous email, I'll read the plan later. On the surface though I can't see how cow-toeing to the likes of NIMS and ICS will help us. Maybe I'm wrong. We'll have to see about that.

Hope to see you guys at the meeting tomorrow night.

73 and aloha, Eric KH6CQ 

On Tuesday, February 19, 2019, 11:36:51 AM GMT-10, Ceridwen Sanders <cerisanders@...> wrote:


 

New Plan Aligns ARES with the Needs of Served Agencies

02/19/2019

The new ARES Plan adopted by the ARRL Board of Directors at its Annual Meeting in January represents an effort to provide ARES with a clearly defined mission, goals, and objectives; specific training requirements, and a system for consistent reporting and record-keeping. The Board’s Public Service Enhancement Working Group (PSEWG) spent more than 3 years crafting the ARES Plan which, ARRL officials believe, provides a much-needed update of the program’s role in public service and emergency preparedness in the 21st century. Concerns focused on bringing ARES into alignment with the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS), and creating more consistent and standardized ARES training requirements. Given dramatic changes and upgrades in national, regional, and local emergency and disaster response organizations, ARRL faced a major challenge, said ARRL Great Lakes Division Director Dale Williams, WA8EFK, who chaired the PSEWG. 

 

“If we didn’t address these issues, such as training standards and organizational management, ARES faced the very real possibility that it would no longer be viewed as a valid and valuable partner in emergency and disaster relief situations,” Williams said.

 

With input from ARES members and a peer review team, and the assistance of emergency response officials with some partner organizations, the PSEWG came up with a plan that provides guidelines to ensure that ARES remains a service of organized, trained, qualified, and credentialed Amateur Radio volunteers who can provide public service partners with radio communication expertise, capability, and capacity, Williams added.

 

A drafted ARES Plan was circulated among ARRL Section Managers (SMs) and Section Emergency Coordinators (ECs) to gather feedback. During the comment period from August through October 2018, the PSEWG heard from 55 ARRL Sections, representing 40 states — more than 125 pages of feedback in all. The PSEWG expressed appreciation to all who submitted comments and ideas. 

 

The PSEWG reviewed every comment and suggestion, identifying about a dozen key items commonly cited by those in the Field Organization to improve the plan.

 

Based on input from ARES participants, the training requirements in the final ARES Plan consist of the free FEMA Professional Development Series. The series comprises these independent study (IS) courses: 120.c, 230.d, 235.c, 240.d, 241.b, 242.b, and 244.b (as they may be amended), as well as the ARRL’s EC-001 and EC-016 emergency communication courses. As part of adopting the ARES Plan, the ARRL Board approved a proposal to make the ARRL EC courses free for ARES members.

 

The plan highlights some additional training programs that ARES participants are encouraged to consider taking, but that are not required, such as AUXCOMM and training courses like ICS-300 and ICS-400.

 

The ARES Plan outlines a three-tiered membership structure based on increased responsibility levels and accompanying training requirements. Although the tiers are not a required path, they serve to define three distinct ways to participate in the ARES program; it’s up to the participant to determine his or her level of involvement. 

 

The ARES Plan points out that public service events such as parades and marathons are within the realm of ARES activity and are, in fact, a key part of it, because such events are an integral part of effective training.

 

In recognizing the local and regional nature of emergency communication needs in disaster response activations, the Plan notes that training requirements are ultimately the responsibility of the Section Manager, with each SM approving training for local ARES teams, as local conditions and needs dictate.

 

The ARES Plan also highlights the relationship between ARES and the National Traffic System (NTS). The PSEWG indicated that it will continue moving forward with efforts to find ways to refine and strengthen that relationship.

 

While the intent of the ARES Plan is to align the ARES organizational structure with the NIMS and ICS systems, Williams noted that, within the ARES structure, the Emergency Coordinator (EC) will continue to lead the ARES team locally during an incident, while the District and Section Emergency Coordinators will continue to serve as resources and support for the EC. (The emergency preparedness staff at ARRL is in the process of updating the EC manual.) The ARES Plan stresses that ARES participants are not first responders, and it encourages ARES leaders to develop and grow their group’s partnerships with state emergency management agencies and officials. Williams said the adoption of the ARES Plan is not the end of this process.

 

“ARES cannot remain stagnant only to be updated once every few generations,” he said. “The ARES Plan, and the ARES program, must be able to evolve.” Williams added that the ARRL Headquarters emergency preparedness staff will review the program annually to ensure its continued relevance.    

 

Re: Today's ARES announcement

Ceridwen Sanders
 

But if everyone is averse to cooperation, we never get anyplace.

Can't we think of no one being the victim but as equals trying to work things out together?  Okay, I'm old but I remember people actually wanting groups to be effective and doing what it takes to make that happen with no defensiveness and/or power struggle.  Geeeez, these are emergency issues, i.e. life and death, not quibbling over who gets more pie.

Re: Today's ARES announcement

Mel
 

Could you tell me about the meeting tomorrow night???
 
 
Mel
KH6EKD
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Eric Grabowski via Groups.Io <ejgrabowski@...>
To: HiCoAres <HiCoAres@groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Feb 19, 2019 12:08 pm
Subject: Re: [HiCoAres] Today's ARES announcement


Hope to see you guys at the meeting tomorrow night.

73 and aloha, Eric KH6CQ 

 

Re: Today's ARES announcement

Norm
 

Hi Mel,

Here's Steve's agenda for tomorrow's meeting. This was sent to all KHRC reflector members.

Aloha, Norm, NH7UA

Invitation to view "HAMFEST 2 February 2019" photographs

Norm
 

Hi,

Nice job, Gary. Thanks.

Aloha, Norm, NH7UA

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: G.L. Miller Photography <noreply@...>
Date: Wed, Feb 20, 2019, 18:49
Subject: Invitation to view "HAMFEST 2 February 2019" photographs
To: <nh7ua@...>


HAMFEST 2 February 2019
Aloha!

You are invited to view my "HAMFEST 2 February 2019" gallery.

Please feel free to share it with friends and family.
HAMFEST 2 February 2019

Cheers,
G.L. Miller Photography
HAMFEST 2 February 2019
© G.L. Miller Photography

--
Aloha, Norm, NH7UA

Re: Invitation to view "HAMFEST 2 February 2019" photographs

Gary Miller
 

Thanks Norm!



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Norm <nh7ua@...>
Date: 2/22/19 7:49 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: khrc@groups.io, hicoares@groups.io
Subject: [HiCoAres] Invitation to view "HAMFEST 2 February 2019" photographs

Hi,

Nice job, Gary. Thanks.

Aloha, Norm, NH7UA

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: G.L. Miller Photography <noreply@...>
Date: Wed, Feb 20, 2019, 18:49
Subject: Invitation to view "HAMFEST 2 February 2019" photographs
To: <nh7ua@...>


HAMFEST 2 February 2019
Aloha!

You are invited to view my "HAMFEST 2 February 2019" gallery.

Please feel free to share it with friends and family.
HAMFEST 2 February 2019

Cheers,
G.L. Miller Photography
HAMFEST 2 February 2019
© G.L. Miller Photography

--
Aloha, Norm, NH7UA

Reminder: Maunakea 146.72 MHz- (PL100.0) repeater, WH6FIU, monthly test set for tomorrow, Saturday, 3/2/19 1200-1300 HST.

Kevin Bogan
 

To: PacSecARES, HiCoARES, Big Island, KHRC, MKSS, OMKM, DECs, others,

As we work through the winter weather, we need to make sure the MK repeater is operational.

The repeater will be turned back on for the one hour test on Saturday 3/2/19, then turned off again. It needs to be tested on a monthly basis (1st Saturday) to continue to map out coverage and discover what minimal conditions are required to maintain communications on the repeater and to insure that it is operational.

Please check in on the Hawaii State VOAD repeater, 146.72 MHz (PL 100.0 Hz) Maunakea on this coming Saturday, March 2, 2019,  1200-1300 HST.

Please help us map the extent of coverage of the Maunakea repeater by checking in on the HSVOAD net from as many locations as possible.

This is an emcomm repeater, so please use best practices as given by the NCS when operating on the repeater.  

This repeater serves the member agencies (e.g., East Hawaii VOAD, American Red Cross, The Salvation Army, Hawaii Pacific Baptist Convention, Team Rubicon, ARES and more) and their partners (e.g., HI-EMA, HCCDA, MEMA, etc.) 

Please give this notice the widest dissemination. 

DECs please acknowledge receipt of this message.

Thanks,

Kevin Bogan, AH6QO
ASM Hawaii State VOAD ARRL/ARES Liaison
Skywarn Amateur Radio Coordinator

Hamfest Roundtable was not short on enthusiasm and ideas!

Ceridwen Sanders
 

After such an enthusiastic turnout and  patient waiting for the results, here are our conclusions:
 
Because of the varied needs, requests, and concerns of the participants, our suggestion is that the act of planning and carrying out a basic hub and spoke exercise islandwide would call out the many issues of practical  interest for us. Our preliminary intent is to include  any group, club, and individual who is willing to identify  functional methods that work  toward our goal of islandwide cooperative EmComm.
 
The reflector BigIslandRADIO@groups.io has been set up as a basic communication tool among us. It allows us to have separate topics whether it be technical info (repeaters, antennas, etc),  locations (Waimea, Hilo, etc.), or training. Please subscribe by sending an empty message to: BigIslandRADIO+subscribe@groups.io
 
RADIO is the easily-remembered  acronym for Radio Amateur Disaster Information Operators and is not a club, or a group, or a new organization, but simply a place to share information and exchange ideas relating to amateur radio communication activities during catastrophic events
 
The sheer volume of interest and energy is literally mind-boggling!
 
Building relationships
Linking of repeaters
Training, exercises, practice, fun events
Training and practice for all bands and modes
Simplex in neighborhoods
Determine frequencies accessible in event
Map of operator locations, repeaters
A method to exchange info among operators
Relationship to HCCDA and ACS 
What can ARES and REACT offer to a unique area like the BI with its restrictions?
Clarification of misunderstandings of responsibilities and resources  of ACS, ARES, HCCDA, CERT, REACT, KHRC, BIARC, PERC
Message handling practice for ACS and ICS formats
Antennas and what they can and can’t do and where
On-island links and off-island links
Served agencies
Available resources info
Uses of digital, when, where,  and how to learn and practice
Special needs of isolated areas (gulches, mountains, low population density)
Learn propagation  techniques
Use of portable and cross band repeaters
Nets, frequencies, uses
 
With all of this positive energy and interest, we’re well on our way to working together.  We’ll be looking forward to the next face-to-face meeting.
 
73, 
Ceri AH6CS 
Rick AH6RK
 

Re: Hamfest Roundtable was not short on enthusiasm and ideas!

Norm
 

Hi Ceri,

Now do we need to move "EMCOMM Roundtable" from Hicoares@groups.io to bigislandradio?

Aloha, Norm, NH7UA

On Sat, Mar 2, 2019, 11:46 Ceridwen Sanders <cerisanders@...> wrote:
After such an enthusiastic turnout and  patient waiting for the results, here are our conclusions:
 
Because of the varied needs, requests, and concerns of the participants, our suggestion is that the act of planning and carrying out a basic hub and spoke exercise islandwide would call out the many issues of practical  interest for us. Our preliminary intent is to include  any group, club, and individual who is willing to identify  functional methods that work  toward our goal of islandwide cooperative EmComm.
 
The reflector BigIslandRADIO@groups.io has been set up as a basic communication tool among us. It allows us to have separate topics whether it be technical info (repeaters, antennas, etc),  locations (Waimea, Hilo, etc.), or training. Please subscribe by sending an empty message to: BigIslandRADIO+subscribe@groups.io
 
RADIO is the easily-remembered  acronym for Radio Amateur Disaster Information Operators and is not a club, or a group, or a new organization, but simply a place to share information and exchange ideas relating to amateur radio communication activities during catastrophic events
 
The sheer volume of interest and energy is literally mind-boggling!
 
Building relationships
Linking of repeaters
Training, exercises, practice, fun events
Training and practice for all bands and modes
Simplex in neighborhoods
Determine frequencies accessible in event
Map of operator locations, repeaters
A method to exchange info among operators
Relationship to HCCDA and ACS 
What can ARES and REACT offer to a unique area like the BI with its restrictions?
Clarification of misunderstandings of responsibilities and resources  of ACS, ARES, HCCDA, CERT, REACT, KHRC, BIARC, PERC
Message handling practice for ACS and ICS formats
Antennas and what they can and can’t do and where
On-island links and off-island links
Served agencies
Available resources info
Uses of digital, when, where,  and how to learn and practice
Special needs of isolated areas (gulches, mountains, low population density)
Learn propagation  techniques
Use of portable and cross band repeaters
Nets, frequencies, uses
 
With all of this positive energy and interest, we’re well on our way to working together.  We’ll be looking forward to the next face-to-face meeting.
 
73, 
Ceri AH6CS 
Rick AH6RK
 


--
Aloha, Norm, NH7UA

Bill Hanson, HCCDA, response to Hamfest Roundtable questions

Ceridwen Sanders
 

REMINDER:  Roundtable discussion is  found online at BigIslandRADIO@groups.io  (to subscribe: BigIslandRADIO+subscribe@groups.io)

In-person discussion held monthly at KHRC meetings  the third Wednesday of alternate months at 7:00 PM at Keck, Waimea, and other months, the third Saturday, 2:00 PM at the Waimea library.  Next meeting: Saturday, March 16, 2:00 PM Waimea Library.  Subscribe: khrc+subscribe@groups.io.


Bill Hanson, HCCDA, has clarified several issues that seemed to cause confusion for the participants of the Hamfest Roundtable.  He is available to refine his responses, if requested, and answer any other questions.  Please send all questions to this site.  Thanks, Ceri
 
1) Who is allowed to participate in when ACS stands up for an event?
ACS is stood up for incidents and usually not events.  ACS can be considered as a dispatch unit is to Fire and Police.  ACS personnel are knowledgeable about handling traffic between field reporting personnel and Civil Defense, again, similar to a dispatch unit at Fire or Police and field personnel.
 
 
2) What is the relationship between ACS and CERT?
ACS is not a CERT Program.  Participants are sourced from multiple areas, one being CERT.
 
3) What is the relationship between HCCDA and ACS?
 HCCDA developed ACS.  HCCDA is an ACS primary client.  ACS’s sole goal is to service reporting needs of HCCDA.
 
4) What is the relationship between ACS and ARES?
ACS welcomes ARES as a partner.  ARES may have other goals and objectives than ACS.
 
5) What message handling protocols and modes  are used by ACS?
 Those that are requested and required by HCCDA.  Information pushed through ACS mirrors HCCDA request/requirement.
 
6) What training, exercises does ACS offer to learn those protocols?
 HCCDA can set up training sessions to accomplish that.
 
7) Who is responsible for initiating the net when ACS stands up for an incident?
 HCCDA is.  The directive comes from HCCDA Administrator to me, then me to ACS.
 
8) Who determines what frequency is used?
 Repeater frequencies of course are issued by the coordinator on Oahu.  ACS does not only use radios to communicate information and data.  ACS leverages and uses other existing technologies as well as radio such as internet.  As for frequencies, HCCDA is still in the process of building out repeaters that HCCDA owns.
 
There was another question earlier regarding the general message form ICS-213.  Over the years and many incidents, HCCDA has streamlined the process of conveying information to the field and reporting from the field.  In short, the 213 is basically a blank piece of paper.  However, HCCDA knows what information it seeks and asks upfront for specific information to be reported on.  HCCDA determines specific information parameters and requests field personnel report accordingly.  There is of course more than just field reporting and that is also taken into consideration.  Those other considerations are primarily RFAs and RFIs that would come in from the field to HCCDA.  These parameters are no different than information and data HCCDA asks Fire, Ocean Safety, Police, and DPW to provide.  So, ACS reporting falls directly in line with how and what HCCDA askes of agency partners.  In a nutshell, this is very much a streamlined process and takes much of the guess work and question marks out of field reporting.  HCCDA welcomes its partners in the community, clubs, ARES and more to develop and have capacity.
 
Please let me know if you need me to explain any of the points.
Mahalo,
 
Bill


Clem Jung clarifies state and county EmComm

Ceridwen Sanders
 

 
I am a volunteer CERT instructor for City & County of Honolulu Department of Emergency Management (DEM) and a retired State Civil Defense (now called Hawaii Emergency Management Agency) as the acting branch chief for plans and operations during the last three months before I retired December 2011, after twelve years.  I took CERT in 1997 and have been a volunteer CERT instructor since 2012.  With this background, I teach the CERT students about the difference between the county emergency management agency or Civil Defense Agency and the State in the CERT Unit 1 - Disaster Preparedness.  All disasters are local and in Hawaii, the county takes ownership of the disaster.  If their county resources are overwhelmed and need additional help, the county would ask the State via HI-EMA for help.  And if the state is overwhelmed, the request goes to Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).  The State and FEMA are there to support the county in a disaster.
 
The State Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES), a volunteer group under HI-EMA (which I am the assistant coordinator) provides amateur radio communications between the State EOC and the four county EOCs when normal communications fail, i.e., landline and cell phones, satellite and internet communications.  State RACES also is there to assist state agencies with communications to the state EOC.  State RACES members have to have back ground checks, are issued ID badges and are activated by HI-EMA. 
 
DEM has two volunteer groups that members also need to have back ground checks, are issued DEM ID badges and are activated by DEM.  They are the Emergency Management Reserve Corps.  They work together with Honolulu Police Department (HPD) and assist with road blocks and evacuations.  They are issued city radios and can communicate with HPD as well as with Honolulu Fire Department, EMS and the DEM EOC.
 
The second volunteer group is the DEM RACES (which I am a member and I help coordinate training and exercises) provides amateur radio communications between the Oahu EOC (DEM) and shelters, with American Red Cross HQ at Diamond Head, The Salvation Army, any other county agencies needing amateur radio communications when normal communications have failed in a disaster or DEM RACES members may be deployed to an area or a community to provide communications back to the EOC, etc.
 
Oahu CERT teams are self activated when there is a major disaster, i.e., a destructive tsunami or hurricane.  We are not directed nor badged by DEM.  However, neighbor island CERT are activated and directed by  their county EMA/CDA.  As an example, the Kailua CERT (which I am a founding member) will activate per our operations plan (which has been reviewed and approved by DEM) will use our Ham radio team to notify DEM or Oahu EOC (the tactical call sign) that we have been activated, etc.  we use VHF and HF for voice and ICS-213 FLDigi to send SITREP, damage reports (DR), RFA, etc. messages to the Oahu EOC.  We can also use Winlink.  We keep Oahu EOC informed on what is happening in Kailua.  We also used the Hams in the team to provide communications between the search teams and the Kailua CERT operations center.  We use FRS radio for intra team communications. 
 
Both the State and DEM encourage all Hams, whether RACES, ARES, Red Cross, The Salvation Army, HealthComm, SKYWARN members, CERT and unaffiliated Hams to participate in their emergency practice nets as well as in a real emergency net.  As FEMA has mentioned, and we talk about it in the CERT Unit 1 - Disaster Preparedness, the ”whole” community needs to get involved in preparing and also to respond to a disaster.  There may be an unaffiliated Ham in a community requesting help and he/she may be the only means of communications from that isolated community.  Both State and DEM RACES will accept the call, whether it is a SITREP (situation report) a RFA (request for assistance) or a RFI (request for information) and State RACES will forward the message to the county EMA/CDA.  The message received may be an ICS-213 form using digital (FLDigi or via WinLink) or just plan voice in a proper format or not and the Ham may not be properly trained as an EMCOMM radio operator, both State and DEM RACES will accept the call.  My understanding is Kauai and Maui counties will also accept these calls.
 
ARES members are also allowed to be shelter radio operators by the American Red Cross (ARC) and DEM.  ARRL and ARC have signed a MOU at the national level.  The ARC Oahu shelter lead has agreed to use ARES members as shelter radio operators.  We used ARES members for Hurricane Lang last year.
 
We do not have enough RACES members at both the State and DEM as well as ARES members if the State is hit with a major disaster.  Many on Hams on Oahu wear many hats.  In the 2017 Hurricane Marie that caused major damages to Puerto Rico, only 3% of their 6,000 Hams in Puerto Rico we’re able to respond to the disaster (they were also victims).  When all communications, even the Puerto Rico Emergency Management and first responder communications failed, amateur radio was the only means of communications for seven weeks.  Hawaii is an island state and we are learning from the lessons from Puerto Rico and preparing for all disasters.
 
ARES members on Oahu may be activated and use the State and/ or DEM RACES linked repeaters before the State or DEM RACES members are activated.  If this becomes so, the ARES members who are RACES members will “switch” hats and will operate as RACES members.  If RACES members are demobilized and amateur radio operators are still needed in certain situations, they can operate as ARES members.  We can also separate the State RACES linked repeaters from DEM RACES linked repeaters so each organization can run their own net. 
 
We encourage all Hams in Hawaii to take the free FEMA independent study IC-100, 200, 700 and 800 via the internet.  Take the free AUXCOMM class when offered, take the now free ARRL EMCOMM 001 and 016 classes, take the CERT class (so they can be better prepared for themselves and their families), then they can do their function as EMCOMM radio operators.  Also learn how to use the ICS-213 general message form (which is now being used as the standard message handling form in EMCOMM and in the Incident Command System) and how to send it by voice and by digital format via FLDigi and Winlink (digital comms are faster, more accurate and the message can be stored and printed out).
 
So in summary, the county Civil Defense/emergency management agency determines who or what resources to use for their disaster response.  However, due to limited Ham resources, especially, in a major disaster, all amateur radio operators should be considered and encouraged when a major disaster occurred.
 
The Hams in each county in the state need to work together, as we do on Oahu.  We need to overcome our politics and set aside differences to assist our served agencies to do what is best FOR THE PEOPLE who will need our help in a major disaster.  We need to pass the message forward using whatever means and relays to whomever it needs to go to.  Make agreements to use/share linked repeaters, stand alone repeaters and be prepared and practice pre-arranged VHF and UHF simplex frequencies to pass messages in case the repeaters fail.  Incorporate HF as well.  Practice passing messages.  The more tools we have and train with the better we will be able to pass the message forward.  Meet and work with each other now so when a disaster occurs we already know each other and each other’s equipment and capabilities. 
 
I have instructed the the ARES DECs to help their communities with EMCOMM and if asked by their county EMA/CD for help, to do so.  Being an island State we cannot refuse any help that is available in a disaster.  We ALL HAVE TO WORK TOGETHER to help our neighbors and our communities in a major disaster.
 
You are free to post this email in its entirety.
 
Clem Jung (KH7HO)
Pacific ARES Section Emergency Coordinator 
State RACES Assistant Coordinator
DEM RACES Member, Training & Exercises
SKYWARN Ham NCS
Kailua CERT Member
DEM Lead CERT Instructor & Windward Oahu CERT Advisor
ARC Volunteer

You, too, can have the inside info!

Ceridwen Sanders
 

We’re hearing that there’s some conversation going on among hams about the BIRadio group's activities, much of it speculation and hearsay.  If you want to have the REAL scoop firsthand, not gossip, send an empty message to BigIslandRADIO+subscribe@groups.io or attend the KHRC club meeting in Waimea at the library at 2:00PM tomorrow, Saturday. We’ll tell all!