Topics

Slow Knitting

Teresa Ambrose
 

Lucinda Shastid
 

Thanks for sharing, T.  But ....

The fourth sentence ("How humbled I was to discover in the first few years of actively working in the knitting industry that this was not the case for every one of the very best and brightest designers and fiber producers!") doesn't make any sense!  WHAT was not the case?  Diving in head first?  Learning when small?  Knitting for a long time?  And she seems to say that it was not the case for at least one of the "best and brightest" - duh!  Something is rarely the case for every one of a group.

The next sentence ("Many crafters whose skills far exceeded my own ... were much more comfortable whispering yarns into beautiful projects or patterns."  It doesn't matter how long they've been knitting - if their skills are beyond your skills, of course they're more comfortable at knitting.  And by the way, I have never managed to "whisper" a yarn into a beautiful pattern.

Her first instruction is to look at the yarn in your stash and think about where it came from.  It came from a yarn store, of course!  (Just as milk and orange juice come from a store, right?)

I agree with her that thoughtful yarn sourcing is a Good Thing, but I dislike her writing and her logic.

Other than that ... great article!  and thanks for sharing.

Lucinda

Teresa Ambrose
 

It was from Martha Stewart so… I find a lot of her online everything somewhat lacking.
Love
T

On Feb 6, 2019, at 8:16 AM, Lucinda Shastid <jzygala@...> wrote:

Thanks for sharing, T.  But ....

The fourth sentence ("How humbled I was to discover in the first few years of actively working in the knitting industry that this was not the case for every one of the very best and brightest designers and fiber producers!") doesn't make any sense!  WHAT was not the case?  Diving in head first?  Learning when small?  Knitting for a long time?  And she seems to say that it was not the case for at least one of the "best and brightest" - duh!  Something is rarely the case for every one of a group.

The next sentence ("Many crafters whose skills far exceeded my own ... were much more comfortable whispering yarns into beautiful projects or patterns."  It doesn't matter how long they've been knitting - if their skills are beyond your skills, of course they're more comfortable at knitting.  And by the way, I have never managed to "whisper" a yarn into a beautiful pattern.

Her first instruction is to look at the yarn in your stash and think about where it came from.  It came from a yarn store, of course!  (Just as milk and orange juice come from a store, right?)

I agree with her that thoughtful yarn sourcing is a Good Thing, but I dislike her writing and her logic.

Other than that ... great article!  and thanks for sharing.

Lucinda

On 2/6/2019 8:00 AM, Teresa Ambrose wrote:
https://www.marthastewart.com/1536070/hannah-thiessen-slow-knitting-book-excerpt

Lucinda Shastid
 

Agree.

Lucinda

On 2/6/2019 8:31 AM, Teresa Ambrose wrote:
It was from Martha Stewart so… I find a lot of her online everything somewhat lacking.
Love
T

On Feb 6, 2019, at 8:16 AM, Lucinda Shastid <jzygala@...> wrote:

Thanks for sharing, T.  But ....

The fourth sentence ("How humbled I was to discover in the first few years of actively working in the knitting industry that this was not the case for every one of the very best and brightest designers and fiber producers!") doesn't make any sense!  WHAT was not the case?  Diving in head first?  Learning when small?  Knitting for a long time?  And she seems to say that it was not the case for at least one of the "best and brightest" - duh!  Something is rarely the case for every one of a group.

The next sentence ("Many crafters whose skills far exceeded my own ... were much more comfortable whispering yarns into beautiful projects or patterns."  It doesn't matter how long they've been knitting - if their skills are beyond your skills, of course they're more comfortable at knitting.  And by the way, I have never managed to "whisper" a yarn into a beautiful pattern.

Her first instruction is to look at the yarn in your stash and think about where it came from.  It came from a yarn store, of course!  (Just as milk and orange juice come from a store, right?)

I agree with her that thoughtful yarn sourcing is a Good Thing, but I dislike her writing and her logic.

Other than that ... great article!  and thanks for sharing.

Lucinda

On 2/6/2019 8:00 AM, Teresa Ambrose wrote:
https://www.marthastewart.com/1536070/hannah-thiessen-slow-knitting-book-excerpt