Date   

Handiham World for November 23, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of November 23, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham23NOV2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

As we contemplate our celebration of the US Thanksgiving holiday this year, we know that our celebrations will look a lot different than they typically do because of the pandemic. Our lives have changed in many ways as we try to adapt to slow the spread of COVID-19. Despite that, I remain thankful for many blessings, including that we have readily available and accessible technology that allows us to interact virtually. I am also grateful for each and every Handiham Program member and volunteer and for all the things you do to support each other and promote the growth of the ham radio hobby. Pemdy and I wish you all a happy and safe Thanksgiving.

Photo of Camp Courage North chapel at sunset with the word Gratitude across the bottom.

We will be holding a Member Gratitude Gathering on Saturday, November 28th, at 3 PM Central Time. That’s 1 PM Pacific, 2 PM Mountain, 3 PM Central, and 4 PM Eastern. All Handiham Program members are welcome and encouraged to join. A Zoom invitation will be sent to everyone on the new Handiham Notify list on Groups.io. If you have not yet changed your membership email from Freelists to Groups.io, please contact Pemdy right away for assistance. You don’t want to miss your chance to come to our virtual gathering! Attendees will be eligible for prizes, and you do have to be present to win.

Photo of Matt and Lynelle playing and singing around the campfire at Radio Camp 2019.

Do you need cartridges for your NLS Talking Book Player? You can now order 4 GB, 8 GB, and 16 GB cartridges from the Perkins Library on Amazon with free shipping. Additionally, you can get mailers and the cable you need if you want to load your own cartridges. Please note: if you are waiting for mail arriving via Free Matter for the Blind, be aware that due to post office delays, mail may take as long as 6 to 8 weeks to arrive.

Photo of the NLS Talking Book Player.

We held Class 9 of the 2020 intro level Morse code course today. It’s hard to believe that we only have three more classes to go. Over the final three weeks, we will be focusing on call signs and QSOs. It has been a pleasure to witness the progress students are making in their ability to copy Morse code. Not only are students learning letters, numbers, and prosigns, the instructors are also helping teach the common abbreviations and shortcuts used in typical Morse code QSOs. In addition to a recording of each week’s class session, students also receive a second weekly recording with more practice to help solidify what they learned in class. If this class sounds like something you would like to participate in or if you are interested in an intermediate level Morse code class to increase your speed, you can ask Pemdy to put you on the list for the next classes in 2021.

Photo of the Morse code key.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session in early February of 2021. This will be an intermediate level class with in-depth coverage of just a few topics. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Invitations went out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter and Handiham Notify lists. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new lists at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old lists. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitations. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Just like with the old Handiham World E-letter and Handiham Notify lists, you can’t post emails to the new lists. The lists are only for receiving notifications and E-Letters from the Handiham Program. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can post, ask questions, and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please contact Pemdy.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 11) covers antennas for your station and what to consider beyond cost and complexity. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working on Monday and Tuesday this week. Because of the Thanksgiving holiday in the United States, however, the Handiham Program office will be closed from Wednesday, November 25, through Friday, November 27. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about the hands-free Smyle Mouse, another article about HamSCI’s data collection plans during the upcoming eclipse, and the final part of a new interview with Tom, KB8TYJ, one of our Morse code class instructors. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

Smyle Mouse

Photo of Smyle Mouse logo.

Smyle Mouse software allows hands-free and voice-free control of your computer with simple facial gestures including head motions and smiling using a standard webcam. Smyle Mouse can be especially helpful to people suffering from disabilities or motor impairments due to spinal cord or traumatic brain injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, arthritis, etc. Users can point using gentle head motions and click with a smile or dwell. It can also be used as an adaptive switch for AAC software. There is no requirement for stickers on the face, sip and puff switches, wearables, or specialized cameras. To learn more, check out the following website at: https://smylemouse.com/.

You can watch a video at: https://youtu.be/OAM4NdlBZ4M.


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi Lucinda,

With time on my hands, I just wanted to share a few things about the Handiham program, some memories, facts etc. A few months back, I read a letter from a first time member on his experience at radio camp. He mentioned the navigation beepers and how helpful they were. This is where I would like to start.

In the early days of radio camp, we generally navigated with a support system. Everyone helps each other. Somehow, I imagined the CW beepers and how they could work. I went to Lyle, K0LR, with the idea, and he made it all work. One of the key letters was the letter I, that identified the turn towards the King Building. If one notices the natural wooded area in front of the King Building, I imagine it to be a beautiful, natural island of Minnesota wilderness.

The rest of the beepers spoke for themselves. K for the King Building, D for the dining hall, B for the beach etc. The second season of the beepers called for an adjustment with the letter B, as Lyle added a motion detector to that location so as to not disturb the natural silence that some campers requested.

I hope this all makes some sense, Lucinda. I especially wanted to make sure Lyle was remembered, as he made it all happen. There, I said it. Handihams is so huge in my life, and it holds so many memories. God willing, it will carry on with your endless energy and with Pemdy at your side.

73,

Jerry Kloss, N0VOE


Interview of the Week

Tom Behler, KB8TYJ, joins us this again week for the last part of a new interview talking about the virtual Morse code class. Tom is one of three instructors teaching for this intro level class. He is both a member and volunteer in the Handiham Program and brings a great deal of experience thanks to his many years as an active ham radio operator. Please enjoy the final part of this interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

TB: I could tell you a story about my son’s first CW contact. My son is a ham. He’s in his thirties. He’s not active now, but he doesn’t let his license expire. He knows the importance of that. I can still remember. He got his Tech Plus. This was back in the 1990s, and one day, I went down into my shack, and he was down there. And he said, I want to see what I can do here, and he just started sending CQ. And I said, go ahead and keep sending CQ. Nobody will probably come back to you right away, so at least if nothing else, it will give you some practice. So, he’s there sending his CQ, and after about the fourth or fifth time, somebody came back to him. And he was like, oh no! What do I do now?

TB: I said, you know what to do. I’m right here with you. And he had his first CW QSO, and the guy he had the QSO with was, I believe, out in Kansas or something like that. And the guy sent him, not only a QSL card to mark his first CW contact, but also a T-shirt. And I don’t know if he still has the T-shirt, but it said something like, first CW contact. And, you know, that is so cool!

TB: It basically verifies what Lucinda says. If you want to learn CW, there will be people to work with you, and they will be happy to do it. And they’ll celebrate your successes when you get them.

LM: Oh, yeah. Absolutely. Well, we’re going to be wrapping up this interview here. Is there anything you haven’t had a chance to share yet but you want to share with everybody, Tom?

TB: I guess what I’m saying to everybody is two things: first, if you have the slighted bit of interest at all in learning the code, go for it. We will keep you posted as to when future classes are going to be. You can also start doing some things on your own, if you’d like. And we can certainly advise you on that, how to get started, even without a class.

TB: And the second thing is, like anything, sometimes the going will get a little bit rough. You’ll think, oh my goodness, I’m never going to learn this. The worst thing you can do is get overwhelmed. Don’t get overwhelmed. Just stop, take a couple of deep breaths. Take a break. Go back into it at some point. It’s not like you’re trying to learn some advanced theory here. You’re simply trying to learn another language. And like learning any language, if you take breaks and come back to it, take it one step at a time. You will learn it. I have seen it so many times. And the people that I’ve seen learn the code are not high IQ, super intelligent people. They’re just everyday people like you and me who wanted to learn a language and did it.

TB: So, it can be done, and I think there are very, very few people out there that absolutely, positively cannot learn the code. You can do it if you want to, and we’re here to help you.

LM: Absolutely. And that’s such a good reminder that anybody can do this. Just like almost anybody can learn a language and learn to communicate one way or another, anybody can learn another language. It does, like you said, take persistence, but if you keep it fun and keep at it, you’ll do it.

TB: Yep, and we’re happy to be a part of it. I think it’s really great that the Handiham Program is doing this. And onward we go from here!

LM: Definitely! Well, thank you so much for doing this, Tom, and we’ll obviously be bringing you back for future interviews as we talk about other things going on in the Handiham Program, because we just keep doing more stuff.

TB: Yep, we do. And we enjoy doing it. That’s what it’s all about. Hams helping hams. I think I heard that somewhere!

LM: Yes! Well, thanks again.

TB: Thank you.

Stay tuned for a new interview airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

December 2020 Eclipse Festival of Frequency Measurement

Doppler cartoon.

For ham radio operators, experimenting is just another fun aspect of the hobby. HamSCI, the Ham Radio Science Citizen Investigation is looking for hams who can help collect propagation data during the eclipse happening across South America on December 14. The study hopes to promote international goodwill by working with citizen scientists around the globe while measuring Doppler shifts caused by space weather’s effects on the ionosphere. To participate, you will need to have a computer connected to your HF radio. A practice run will take place on December 5th, so hams can be ready to record data from December 9th through December 16th. To learn more, go to: https://hamsci.org/december-2020-eclipse-festival-frequency-measurement


A Dip in the Pool

drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the Technician Class pool this week to a question about converting your radio to another band.

T7A06 What device converts the RF input and output of a transceiver to another band?

A. High-pass filter.
B. Low-pass filter.
C. Transverter.
D. Phase converter.

For many people who came to ham radio from the CB bands, some of that equipment can be repurposed using a transverter to convert the 11 meter CB signal to another band that includes ham radio privileges, making answer C the correct choice. We’ve heard a lot about the experience, Matt Arthur, KA0PQW, has using a reasonably-priced transverter to operate on bands like 222 MHz. If you want to play on that band, purchasing a transverter is a great way to upgrade your station while remaining within your budget.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is six hours ahead of Minnesota time during the winter.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for November 16, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of November 16, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham16NOV2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

If you have not yet filed your comments on the FCC proposal to increase fees for amateur radio operators, today is your last chance to do so. The ARRL will file comments opposing the proposal, and with the November 16th deadline, they are asking members to add their voices by filing comments as well. To help you with this process, the ARRL has prepared a Guide to Filing Comments with the FCC located at http://arrl.org/fcc-fees-proposal with tips and filing instructions.

Photo of FCC logo.

We will be holding a Member Gratitude Gathering on Saturday, November 28th, at 3 PM Central Time. That’s 1 PM Pacific, 2 PM Mountain, 3 PM Central, and 4 PM Eastern. All Handiham Program members are welcome and encouraged to join. A Zoom invitation will be sent to everyone on the new Handiham Notify list on Groups.io. If you have not yet changed your membership email from Freelists to Groups.io, please contact Pemdy for assistance. You don’t want to miss your chance to come to our virtual gathering! Attendees will be eligible for prizes, and you do have to be present to win.

Photo of the tablet and smartphone with party hats and streamers.

Do you need cartridges for your NLS Talking Book Player? You can now order 4 GB, 8 GB, and 16 GB cartridges from the Perkins Library on Amazon with free shipping. Additionally, you can get mailers and the cable you need if you want to load your own cartridges. Please note: if you are waiting for mail arriving via Free Matter for the Blind, be aware that due to post office delays, mail may take as long as 6 to 8 weeks to arrive.

Photo of the NLS Talking Book Player.

Today was class 8 of the 2020 intro level Morse code class. It’s hard to believe that we are heading into the home stretch on this series of classes. It has been a pleasure to witness the progress students are making in their ability to copy Morse code. Not only are students learning letters, numbers, and prosigns, the instructors are also helping teach the common abbreviations and shortcuts used in typical Morse code QSOs. In addition to a recording of each week’s class session, students also receive a second weekly recording with more practice to help solidify what they learned in class. If this class sounds like something you would like to participate in or if you are interested in an intermediate level Morse code class to increase your speed, you can ask Pemdy to put you on the list for the next classes in 2021.

Photo of the Morse code key.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session in February of 2021. This will be an intermediate level class with more in-depth coverage of topics. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Invitations went out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter and Handiham Notify lists. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new lists at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old lists. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitations. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Just like with the old Handiham World E-letter and Handiham Notify lists, you can’t post emails to the new lists. The lists are only for receiving notifications and E-Letters from the Handiham Program. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can post, ask questions, and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please contact Pemdy.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 11) covers antennas for your station and what to consider beyond cost and complexity. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. Because of the Thanksgiving holiday in the United States next week, the Handiham Program office will be closed from Wednesday, November 25, through Friday, November 27. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about the RightHear app, another article about the Hurricane Watch Net activation for Hurricane Iota, and the next part of a new interview with Tom, KB8TYJ, one of our Morse code class instructors. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

RightHear App

Photo of RightHear logo.

Since the launch of RightHear in March of 2016, more than 800 venues have turned their public spaces into accessible environments for people with blindness, low-vision, or orientation challenges. Users of RightHear can independently access hundreds of places that used to be inaccessible in 26 different languages. Every day, new locations are joining the network of accessible environments, promoting a global community of independent travelers.  To learn more, check out the following website at: https://www.right-hear.com/our-story/.

You can watch a video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCvYzWtusq0.


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi Lucinda,

The month of November has always reminded me to pause and give thanks for so much in my life. And so it is when I reflect on the Handiham Program and its current day to day service to its membership. As the director of the program, you have certainly brought the program a long way since that twenty-four-hour bus ride to camp in 2007. Each time I read Handiham World, I ask, “where does she get the energy?” Week after week, there seems to be no end to opportunity for members to advance in the hobby.

It should also be noted the energy that Pemdy Aasland brings to the program. I wonder if members know that Pemdy has a worldwide map in her office with every Handiham member marked with a pin, identifying their home QTH.

Also, I want to give a Thanksgiving “tip of the hat” to volunteers who contribute to the radio camps, like Don, N0VBE, and Matt, KA0PQW, who provide the equipment for the daily nets. Every Wednesday night, “there he is,” Doug, N6NFF, with a well-prepared trivia net to enjoy.

The Handiham Program, going forward, is in good hands thanks to you, Lucinda. As a well-qualified senior member of this Program, I am so fortunate to be a part.

Happy Thanksgiving to one and all.

Jerry Kloss, N0VOE


What is a “mission line” or “tension line?”

Though the most common name is “mission line,” I prefer to refer to it as a “tension line.” So, what is it? It is simply a small diameter rope to which your wire antenna is attached in such a manner as to remove all of the tension from the antenna and place the tension entirely on the rope. The purpose is to take all of the pressure off of the antenna’s connections, like the feedpoint where the feedline is attached to the antenna.

I have used such a tension line to remove the stress on my dipoles, off-center fed windoms, double bazookas, and even my loops. I am currently using an off-center fed windom attached to a tension line, and here is how I did it. My OCF Windom is about 135-feet long made from #12-gage, stranded, vinyl-coated antenna wire. The feedpoint is at about 44-feet, 6-inches from one end or about 90-feet, 6-inches from the other end. I feed it with low-loss, 52 ohm coax through a 4-to-1 balun. I attached the antenna using zip ties to the tension line which is a long length of ¼-inch, 100% Dacron Polyester, UVA treated Rope. The length of this rope depends on how you are securing your antenna. In my case, I have the rope going through a pulley at each end with the pulleys secured to trees. The rope is long enough to go around the pulleys and down to the ground. I have a kind of unique setup because I wanted to keep constant pressure on the tension line even when the wind was blowing quite hard, causing the trees to sway. To achieve this constant tension, I attached weights to the ends of the rope, elevating the weights off the ground by about 18-inches. For weights, I used buckets or pails filled about halfway with gravel. This method seems to work extremely well; though, admittedly, it probably looks a bit strange, especially since my buckets are a bright blue. They were just buckets I had on hand; so, they were handy. If I were to purchase buckets specifically for this purpose, I would buy camouflage colored buckets, which would be less visible.

Ron, K8HSY

Editor’s note: This article is now available in the Manuals and Tutorials section of the Members Only website under Antennas.


Interview of the Week

Tom Behler, KB8TYJ, joins us this again week for the next part of a new interview talking about the virtual Morse code class. Tom is one of three instructors teaching for this intro level class. He is both a member and volunteer in the Handiham Program and brings a great deal of experience thanks to his many years as an active ham radio operator. Please enjoy the next part of this interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: I sure appreciate you being willing to come on board as an instructor. We have three instructors for this class, so nobody has to teach week after week, and students get to experience the different teaching styles from different instructors. Also, it enables the instructors to focus on their weeks rather than having to focus on doing 12 weeks in a row.

TB: Yeah, it is a considerable amount of work to develop the lessons and then get them into a format in which they are able to be sent via the code. But to review quickly, for each class, we’ll introduce the new characters if there are some, and then we do some review of previous weeks. And then with the new characters, we send words and sentences.

TB: And now, I think it’s this week, if I remember correctly, we’re going to start introducing some of the numbers. We’re going to start with zero and five. And that way, guess what? We can start playing with call signs. And obviously, call signs will be important for any QSO that you have.

TB: So, we have a lot of fun with it. And we try to keep our sessions within 45 minutes or so, so people don’t get totally overwhelmed. And we hope that after the class, people get motivated and continue and find creative ways to practice and learn the code while we’re not there. And I think I see that happening with the students that we’ve got. They’ve been working at it, and that’s neat to see.

LM: Yes. And one of the things that we are looking at doing next year is offering an intermediate level class where the idea would be to help people get up to somewhere around 13 words per minute. So, this would be a class for people who already know Morse code, but now they want to work on increasing their speed.

TB: Yeah. And that’s going to be really fun to try to develop that, to see if we can figure out ways to have people send the code and maybe get some interchange going back and forth. And we can talk about various strategies for sending the code, what works best for people and so on. It’s just a lot of fun! We’re just getting started here, I think. You’re going to hear a lot more about this as time goes on.

LM: Absolutely! And just so everybody knows, all three of our instructors are blind. So, if you’re blind and you’ve tried a regular Morse code class and it just didn’t seem to work out because everything seemed to be oriented toward people who are sighted, nope, not this one. And by the way, even people who are in the class who have sight seem to be doing well with the way we’re doing it; so it doesn’t seem to be excluding anyone.

TB: Yeah, it doesn’t, as far as we can tell. If you’re sighted, it may be easier for you to write down the code. A lot of us who are blind, what we do, we just head copy. We copy in our heads, probably because that’s the way we’ve done things all our lives. We’re audio learners, and we copy the code in our heads. Maybe what I do if I’m in a QSO with somebody, sometimes I’ll write down the name and QTH just so I don’t forget it. But basically, I’m just to the point where when I’m in a QSO using Morse code, it’s just like having a conversation. And it’s not very stressful at all. In fact, I find it relaxing.

TB: And people are really good on the air, by the way. If you tell them, hey, you’re sending a little too quickly for me. Can you slow down a little bit? They will. They really will. And that’s what makes it even better. People accommodate to everybody.

LM: You know, there’s plenty of people on the air who’ve been on the air for years and years. And when they hear somebody who’s just trying to learn Morse code and making their first tentative efforts to get on the air and send, they’ll do whatever they can to help that new person out and get them going. And I’ve seen that over and over again throughout the years. We have some really great people in the ham radio hobby.

Stay tuned for the final part of our interview with Tom airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

Hurricane Watch Net to Activate for Hurricane Iota

Photo of Hurricane Watch Net logo.

The Hurricane Watch Net (HWN) will activate today for Hurricane Iota. The Net will start on 20 meters, moving to 40 meters as needed due to propagation. Hurricane Iota is expected to make landfall as a major hurricane with the potential of catastrophic winds and life-threatening storm surge. The net requests observed weather data from stations in the affected area. The net also remains available to provide back-up communications for official agencies such as emergency operations centers, the Red Cross, and storm shelters in the impacted areas. Additionally, the net collects damage assessment data to forward to FEMA officials. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/hurricane-watch-net-to-activate-for-hurricane-iota


A Dip in the Pool

drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the new Extra Class pool this week to a question about antennas.

E9A01 What is an isotropic antenna?

A. A grounded antenna used to measure Earth conductivity.
B. A horizontally polarized antenna used to compare Yagi antennas.
C. A theoretical, omnidirectional antenna used as a reference for antenna gain.
D. A spacecraft antenna used to direct signals toward Earth.

For hams, having an isotropic antenna is the equivalent of “having a bridge for sale.” You will often see them offered for sale by ham radio businesses each year on April 1st. The reality is, however, that an isotropic antenna is really just a theoretical antenna used to calculate gain or loss in an antenna system, making answer C the correct choice.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.

The November issue of the QCWA Journal is now available in Mp3 audio in the Magazines and Newsletters section of the Members Only website.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is six hours ahead of Minnesota time during the winter.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for November 9, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of November 9, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham09NOV2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

If you have not yet filed your comments on the FCC proposal to increase fees for amateur radio operators, you still have a week left to do so. The ARRL will file comments opposing the proposal, and with the fast approaching November 16th deadline, they are asking members to add their voices by filing comments as well. To help you with this process, the ARRL has prepared a Guide to Filing Comments with the FCC located at http://arrl.org/fcc-fees-proposal with tips and filing instructions.

Photo of FCC logo.

The virtual Closing the Gap conference is in its final few days, and I have been enjoying all the presentations about the latest in accessibility and assistive technology. It has been so nice to be able to attend virtually and take in so many sessions, even more than is possible at an in-person conference. I will continue sharing some of what I have learned in the News in Assistive Technology column over the next few weeks.

Photo of the logo for the 2020 Closing the Gap virtual conference.

Do you need cartridges for your NLS Talking Book Player? You can now order 4 GB, 8 GB, and 16 GB cartridges from the Perkins Library on Amazon with free shipping. Additionally, you can get mailers and the cable you need if you want to load your own cartridges. Please note: if you are waiting for mail arriving via Free Matter for the Blind, be aware that due to post office delays, mail may take as long as 6 to 8 weeks to arrive.

Photo of the NLS Talking Book Player.

Today was class 7 of the 2020 intro level Morse code class. Jim Shaffer, KE5AL, was our instructor this week, and next week, John Farina, W2QCY will be back at the teacher’s desk. Not only are students learning letters, numbers, and prosigns, the instructors are also helping teach the common abbreviations and shortcuts used in typical Morse code QSOs. In addition to a recording of each week’s class session, students also receive a second weekly recording with more practice to help solidify what they learned in class. If this class sounds like something you would like to participate in or if you are interested in an intermediate level Morse code class to increase your speed, you can ask Pemdy to put you on the list for the next classes in 2021.

Photo of the Morse code key.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session in February of 2021. This will be an intermediate level class with more in-depth coverage of topics. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Invitations went out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter and Handiham Notify lists. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new lists at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old lists. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitations. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Just like with the old Handiham World E-letter and Handiham Notify lists, you can’t post emails to the new lists. The lists are only for receiving notifications and E-Letters from the Handiham Program. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can post, ask questions, and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please contact Pemdy.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 10) has an interview about the ARRL’s new Learning Network webinars. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about Android’s Action Blocks, another article about a Long Island radio club’s donation to a local hospital to support their COVID-19 response, and the next part of a new interview with Tom, KB8TYJ, one of our Morse code class instructors. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

Android Action Blocks

Photo of Android phone display with Google Action Blocks on the home screen.

Enabled by the Google Assistant, Action Blocks helps people simplify interactions on their Android phone. This is especially helpful for people with cognitive disabilities, people with age-related disabilities, people who struggle with completing a multi-step process on their smart phone because of physical disabilities, or people who just want a faster way to complete an action with their smart phone. With a single tap, Action Blocks lets you quickly message a family member, watch a movie, check your schedule for the day, and more. It’s easy to create these Action Blocks with the free app available from the Google Play store, and once you create an Action Block, it is placed on the home screen to facilitate easy access. To learn more, check out the following website at: https://support.google.com/accessibility/android/answer/9711267?hl=en.

You can watch a video at: https://youtu.be/vzoqe3PF9LY.


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi everyone,

I wanted to offer some suggestions regarding how to effectively learn the Morse code. The first thing I want to say is that it will take time, but if you persist, you eventually should get there. Short listening and learning sessions are always the best, even if you have to do them several times a day. When you attempt to learn the characters, learn them by their sound, not by counting dits and dahs. It’s the sound of each character that you listen for when copying the code. When you work with words, start with shorter words first; the longer words will come with time. Another suggestion would be to concentrate on listening to and copying the code first, so you are extremely comfortable with it. Then, sending will be much easier and should almost come naturally. I know this all seems a bit overwhelming at first, but believe me, you are not alone.

73,

Tom Behler, KB8TYJ


Interview of the Week

Tom Behler, KB8TYJ, joins us this again week for the next part of a new interview talking about the virtual Morse code class. Tom is one of three instructors teaching for this intro level class. He is both a member and volunteer in the Handiham Program and brings a great deal of experience thanks to his many years as an active ham radio operator. Please enjoy the next part of this interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: And with the extended sunspot lows that we have had in recent cycles, Morse code is another mode that you can use when conditions aren’t the best. You can still make Morse code contacts even when you can’t make phone contacts.

TB: Well, I always tell people—well, with modes like FT8, it’s a little bit different now, but I always used to tell people that CW always gets through. It gets through much easier than a single sideband contact would get through, simply because all you’re doing is turning on and off your transmitter. You’re not modulating a voice. You’re not doing any of that stuff. You’re just sending code, on and off, and that will always get through. I can make CW contacts with just 10 watts that would easily take me over 100 watts to make on single sideband.

TB: And the other thing that I would point out is that there are practical reasons to learn the code. How many repeaters do you hear on the air that ID in CW? There’s a lot of them. If you know CW, you can get the call sign of that repeater, and you can look it up if you need to in order to get the information about how to get into the repeater, what the tones are, etc. But you won’t be able to do that if you can’t copy the call in CW.

LM: Right.

TB: So, there are all kinds of reasons to learn the code.

LM: And the same thing is true as far as the beacons. When you’re looking for band conditions to see if a band is open to a specific area, you want to be able to copy that.

TB: Yep, you want to be able to copy that, and learning the code will let you do that. Another advantage of learning the code is this: Don’t forget, folks, CW is international. With the help of prosigns and the Q signals, you can save lots of time and efficiently communicate with people across the globe. You don’t necessarily have the language barrier that you would with voice contacts. CW is CW, and that is also important, especially if you end up doing a lot of DX or long-distance work.

LM: And on Field Day, you’ll be the most popular member of your club if you’re racking up CW points.

TB: Well, yeah, because, for example, Field Day. Many of you know this. If you make a phone contact, single sideband, it’s one point. Guess what? CW contacts, like all other digital contacts, are two points.

TB: In fact, it was funny. I moved down to this area of Michigan four years ago—I can’t believe it’s been almost four years already. And I started attending one of our local clubs here, and they started talking about Field Day, and somehow the subject of CW came up. And I said, do you want me to make some CW contacts for Field Day for you? Yeah, yeah, we could do that.

TB: And I worked with another club member, and we set up a CW station, and boy did we become popular because we got twice the number of points for every contact that anybody else made, and it really raised our score. And we had fun, which was the most important thing.

LM: Yes, absolutely. It’s the fun. We don’t want to forget that. Yes, we do things to support our communities and provide support in areas like public safety that we do with ham radio. But it’s still a hobby, and we need to have fun.

TB: So, the Morse code, CW, is out there, and it’s a valuable mode. And once you learn the code, if you use it on a regular basis, I guarantee you that your copying and your sending will increase over time. It’s like anything else. If you use it, you won’t lose it. In fact, if anything, you’ll gain those skills in additional ways that you never thought was possible.

TB: I can remember back in the day, I used to never think much about contesting, for example. Now, it’s like I’m addicted to it. I mean, because it’s fun. Like, last year, I made this many contacts in this contest. Let’s see if this year I can make more, you know. You set your own little goals. I’m not a big gun contester, but I can contest.

TB: And CW is the easiest way that I can contest because I don’t have a high profile station here. I don’t have a high profile antenna system. I just have wire antennas, and I’m in a small lot here and can’t do much. But CW can get me on the air, and in contesting, I can compete with the rest of them because I know the code and I know how to use it.

Stay tuned for the next part of our interview with Tom airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

Long Island Hams Honor Local Hospital’s COVID-19 Efforts with Donation

Photo of Radio Central Amateur Radio Club logo.

On Long Island, New York, where the COVID-19 pandemic hit hard earlier in 2020, members of the Radio Central Amateur Radio Club, W2RC, decided that medical responders and their support teams needed a show of support for their service. The club took up a collection for a donation to the local hospital, St. Charles Hospital, in Port Jefferson. The club’s president, Neil Heft, KC2KY, said they wanted to do something more than just putting up a thank you sign. Their donation was recently presented to the hospital in recognition of the hard work done by all the staff. To learn more, go to: https://forums.qrz.com/index.php?threads/long-island-hams-honor-local-hospital%E2%80%99s-covid19-efforts-with-1-000-donation.732216/


A Dip in the Pool

drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the General Class pool this week to a question about ferrite cores.

G6B01 What determines the performance of a ferrite core at different frequencies?

A. Its conductivity.
B. Its thickness.
C. The composition, or “mix,” of materials used.
D. The ratio of outer diameter to inner diameter.

Ferrite is an iron-based ceramic material that increases the permeability of an inductor when used as a core. It is important, however, to use the right composition or mix of materials based on the frequency and power levels required for the inductor you need, making answer C the correct choice. If you get the opportunity to wind your own ferrite core inductors, you will find that it is a bit of an art form and a very educational process.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is six hours ahead of Minnesota time during the winter.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for November 2, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of November 2, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham02NOV2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

While it seems difficult to believe, we returned to standard time over the past weekend in the United States. It’s November already, and 2020 is just flying by! Don’t forget that the Handiham Nets are held based on local time, so if you are in other parts of the world, you will need to adjust for the time change.

Photo of fall leaves and an alarm clock.

The virtual Closing the Gap conference started last week, and I have been enjoying seeing all the latest in accessibility and assistive technology. Unlike the in-person conferences where one can only hear a few presentations per day over just three days, with the virtual conference, I can hear any number of presentations over the two weeks that the conference is in session. I will be sharing some of what I learn in the News in Assistive Technology column over the next few weeks.

Photo of the logo for the 2020 Closing the Gap virtual conference.

Do you need cartridges for your NLS Talking Book Player? You can now order 4 GB, 8 GB, and 16 GB cartridges from the Perkins Library on Amazon with free shipping. Additionally, you can get mailers and the cable you need if you want to load your own cartridges. Please note: if you are waiting for mail arriving via Free Matter for the Blind, be aware that due to post office delays, mail may take as long as 6 to 8 weeks to arrive.

Photo of the NLS Talking Book Player.

The Morse code class reaches the half-way point this week with class 6. We are pleased to have Tom Behler, KB8TYJ, back at the teacher’s desk this week. Not only are students learning letters, numbers, and prosigns, the instructors are also helping teach the common abbreviations and shortcuts used in typical Morse code QSOs. Next week, we will have Jim, KE5AL, as our instructor. In addition to a recording of each week’s class session, students also receive a second recording with more practice to help solidify what they learned in class. If this class sounds like something you would like to participate in or if you are interested in an intermediate level Morse code class to increase your speed, you can ask Pemdy to put you on the list for the next classes in 2021.

Photo of the Morse code key.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session in February of 2021. This will be an intermediate level class with more in-depth coverage of topics. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Invitations have gone out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter and Handiham Notify lists. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new lists at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old lists. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitations. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Just like with the old Handiham World E-letter and Handiham Notify lists, you can’t post emails to the new lists. The lists are only for receiving notifications and E-Letters from the Handiham Program. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can post, ask questions, and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please contact Pemdy.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 10) has an interview about the ARRL’s new Learning Network webinars. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about Apple’s Swift Playgrounds app, another article about the ARRL’s plan to file comments in response to the proposed increase in fees, and the next part of a new interview with Tom, KB8TYJ, one of our Morse code class instructors. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

Everyone Can Code: Swift Playgrounds App

Photo of logo for Apple Swift Playgrounds app.

Technology has a language. It’s called code, and Apple believes that everyone should have access to coding. It is an essential skill in our increasingly technologically dependent world. Learning to code teaches people how to solve problems and work together in creative ways. It also allows people to build apps that bring their ideas to life. Apple feels that everyone should have the opportunity to create something that can change the world. To help accomplish that goal, they designed a program that lets anyone learn, write, and teach code. The program includes the free Swift Playgrounds App along with lesson plans that are suitable for students and teachers. To learn more, check out the following website at: https://www.apple.com/in/everyone-can-code/


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi everyone,

This is a good list of Morse code abbreviations: https://www.qsl.net/w5www/abbr.html

73,

Jim Shaffer, KE5AL


Interview of the Week

Tom Behler, KB8TYJ, joins us this again week for the next part of a new interview talking about the virtual Morse code class. Tom is one of three instructors teaching for this intro level class. He is both a member and volunteer in the Handiham Program and brings a great deal of experience thanks to his many years as an active ham radio operator. Please enjoy the next part of this interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

TB: I’m even working with some people locally here, at least one person, maybe two, who just want to learn the code. And I’m sort of trying to work with them in the same way, and now one of the people, he’s actually getting on the air and making QSOs.

LM: Wow!

TB: And he said, you know it took a bit more effort than I thought it would, but he said, I’m really glad I did it. This guy is now making QSOs. Last night, he emailed me and said, hey, what about contesting. I want to get into contesting now. I said, okay, the first step that we’re going to do is we’re going to have you over here for a contest, and we’ll have you make some contacts, so you can see how it’s done, because it varies with each contest. And before we know it, I think I’m going to have a real competitor here. I think it’s going to happen.

LM: That’s great!

TB: This is all because he wanted to learn CW. He wanted to learn the code. And I think what you find in ham radio so often is that if somebody wants to learn something, if they start asking around, they will get help. They will get help because that’s just the way hams are.

LM: Yeah, and what a great thing. You know, right now, we’re in a pandemic, things are a little different than normal, and this is a great opportunity to zero in on learning that new language, expand your brain.

TB: Yes. And there’s one thing that I do want to address here, quickly, because I think it is important. Some people, when they talk about learning the code, get really eager, and they want to start sending the code. And what we tell them is, that will come. Don’t worry about sending right now. What you need to worry about at this point is, make sure that you can copy those letters or characters without even thinking about it, that it becomes so natural that when you hear dit-dah, that’s an A.

TB: Get to that point so that you can really copy the code well. Then sending gets really easy. Then sending is just adding another little skill to what you have already gathered. If you start sending too soon, you may send the code incorrectly, and then you’re not going to learn it the way you should, and then that will create problems down the road.

LM: That’s a good reminder for everybody.

TB: And in future CW classes or Morse code classes, I’m not sure how we would do this, but, what I would really like us to do, and maybe this will be for the next series of classes, I’d like to see if we can figure out a way to get people who have learned the code to actually now work together and start sending it.

TB: I remember in my area of Michigan one, actually it was a number of years, I did CW classes very similar to what we are doing now. And at some point, it was after we were pretty sure that everyone had learned all the characters and were pretty comfortable with them, we actually got on the air. It was a 10 meter frequency in our local area. I think it was every Monday night at 8:00 pm, and we just had QSOs.

TB: People would just send the code back and forth, and we made sure that everybody gave their IDs and stayed within the legal limits of what we need to do. And it was a lot of fun. And we, even as a result of all that, we even had people pass the 20 word per minute code for the Extra when that was required back in the day. So, it can work, and again, you just have to be dedicated to it, ask for help when you need it, ask questions if you need clarification on things, and you will learn the code. It will happen.

LM: Definitely. You know, people have been learning languages since time began, so there’s no reason why anybody out there can’t learn it.

TB: That’s right, that’s right. It doesn’t take intelligence. It almost takes more perseverance and persistence than anything.

LM: Yes.

TB: And as long as you can do that, as long as you can hang in there and not get yourself overwhelmed or discouraged, you will get it, you really will, especially if you’ve been interested in it to begin with. There’s no reason that you can’t do it and do well with it.

TB: And I always get the question, well CW, Morse code, that’s outdated, isn’t it? And I always say, if you think Morse code is outdated or CW is outdated, go on the HF bands during a contest weekend. You’ll see wall to wall CW, unbelievable amounts. There are times when I can’t even find a frequency to call CQ on because there are so many people.

TB: People love the code, and once they get over the mental obstacle of convincing themselves that they can learn it, they will learn it. It’s just not that hard. You just have to persevere.

LM: Right.

Stay tuned for the next part of our interview with Tom airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

ARRL Urges Members to Join in Strongly Opposing FCC’s Application Fees Proposal

Photo of ARRL logo.

The ARRL will file comments opposing the FCC proposal that would increase amateur radio license and application fees. Because of the fast approaching November 16th deadline, the ARRL is asking members to add their voices by filing comments as well. To help you with this process, the ARRL has prepared a Guide to Filing Comments with the FCC located at http://arrl.org/fcc-fees-proposal with tips and filing instructions. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/arrl-urges-members-to-join-in-strongly-opposing-fcc-s-application-fees-proposal


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the Technician Class pool this week to a question about coax.

T7C10 Why should the outer jacket of coaxial cable be resistant to ultraviolet light?

A. Ultraviolet resistant jackets prevent harmonic radiation.
B. Ultraviolet light can increase losses in the cable’s jacket.
C. Ultraviolet and RF signals can mix, causing interference.
D. Ultraviolet light can damage the jacket and allow water to enter the cable.

You can have the best radio and the greatest antenna system, but if your coax isn’t good, your signal won’t get out. Always look for professional-grade coaxial cable that has an outer jacket that will not break down from exposure to ultraviolet rays from the sun. If you use poor quality coax, the jacket will likely break down allowing moisture to collect inside the cable, making answer D the correct choice. If moisture gets into your coax, you will be off the air.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is six hours ahead of Minnesota time during the winter.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 

 


Handiham World for October 26, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of October 26, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham26OCT2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

It’s difficult to believe that this is week 5 of the Morse code class. John Farina, W2QCY, was the instructor this week. Next week, we will have Tom Behler, KB8TYJ, back to teach. In addition to a recording of each week’s class session, students also receive a second recording with more practice to help solidify what they learned in class. If this class sounds like something you would like to participate in or if you are interested in an intermediate level Morse code class to increase your speed, you can ask Pemdy to put you on the list for the next classes in 2021.
Photo of the Morse code key.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session in February of 2021. This will be an intermediate level class with more in-depth coverage of topics. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.
Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Invitations have gone out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter and Handiham Notify lists. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new lists at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old lists. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitations. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Just like with the old Handiham World E-letter and Handiham Notify lists, you can’t post emails to the new lists. The lists are only for receiving notifications and E-Letters from the Handiham Program. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can post, ask questions, and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please contact Pemdy.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 10) has an interview about the ARRL’s new Learning Network webinars. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about a new accessible watch, another article about activations for yet another tropical storm, and the first part of a new interview with Tom, KB8TYJ, one of our Morse code class instructors. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

New Accessible Watch from Eone

Photo of stylish, accessible watch that works for individuals who are sighted or blind.

The founder of Eone realized there was a need for an accessible, stylish watch for people who are blind or visually impaired when his friend and classmate couldn’t tell time during the class. While his friend had a talking watch, using it during a lecture would have been disruptive. Looking for better alternative, the Bradley timepiece from Eone was designed through a collaboration between designers and people with vision impairments to create a watch that is accessible for people who are sighted or blind. Time is indicated by two ball bearings, one that marks minutes and the other that marks hours. To learn more, check out the following website at: https://www.watches.com/collections/eone-watches

You can also watch a video from Sam at the Blind Life at: https://youtu.be/ia1QNFgS6RE


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Please pass this to every ham operator that you know of.

Many thanks,

Ron, KR3DOG

Subject: This is a call to action for the ARRL.

Greetings fellow ARRL members,

It is time to protest the imposition of fees for Amateur Radio Licensing. Many members shared concerns about the FCC’s proposal for a $50 “application fee” for license applications in the Amateur Radio Service. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) was published in the Federal Register (https://tinyurl.com/yyk8f2yp). The deadline for comments is November 16, and the Reply comment deadline is November 30.

With this in mind, I am extending the following suggestions you might consider using in writing to the FCC in response to the NPRM. Our thanks to Dave Siddall K3ZJ, ARRL Counsel, for these guidelines. Be sure to carefully review the article as the information therein will assist with much of the applicable background.

This subject is critical, and the timing is critical. I urge you to contact the FCC now. The address and related information is contained in the article referenced in the Federal Register. Please use your own words to express your objections to the proposed fees.

(Good) Arguments Against FCC Fees for Radio Amateurs:

Amateurs contribute to the public good. In many areas they provide an emergency communications backbone capability at no taxpayer cost. Consistently we have witnessed storms and natural disasters completely wipe out internet, cellular, and other means of communication. Radio amateurs often fill that void on an unmatched, flexible basis when needed. One recent example is the California wildfires.

Unlike operators in other FCC licensed services, Amateur Radio operators by law domestic and international — must eschew using their license for any pecuniary interest. Amateurs are prohibited from earning or charging any money for any communications activity. The expenses for their equipment and activities come out of their own pockets, with no opportunity for reimbursement or payment of any kind.

The United States is experiencing a severe lack of RF engineers and expertise at the very time it is needed by the burgeoning wireless industries. Amateur radio is helping to meet the deficit, but much more is needed and youngsters (High School and College-aged) are least able to afford licensing fees. RF knowledge and related digital expertise is needed to maintain U.S. leadership in wireless industries.

At a minimum, young people (below the age of 26) should be exempt from the proposed license fees. Amateur radio is self-regulating. (a) Amateur examinations are written and administered by radio amateur volunteers. (b) Examination results and paperwork most often are submitted electronically to the FCC. Electronic submission could be required if there would be a cost savings to the Commission. (c) Amateur radio educational classes are conducted by volunteers who by-and-large do not charge fees or tuition for teaching. (d) The amateur service, in cooperation with the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau, has a volunteer corps that monitors the amateur airwaves and has programs that try to prevent their misuse before FCC involvement might be needed. The amateurs also observe non-amateur signals both within amateur spectrum and outside it, and report unusual or suspicious signals. Amateur radio continues to be a source of significant technological innovation that should be encouraged, not discouraged.

Some Suggestions:

We do not recommend arguing that the $50, fee every 10 years, which amounts to $5.00 a year, will harm or kill amateur radio, even though as proposed this is for each covered application, which includes upgrade applications. Tech-General-Extra could be $150. If exams were taken at different sessions, it would be a substantial amount. But it is not a good idea to say the whole service turns on $5/year for each licensee.

The Commission argues that the charges are required by the statute. The word used in the Congressional Act which directs the FCC to collect fees is “shall”, which is mandatory, not optional. But the statute does not set the amount, nor does it prohibit reasonable exceptions evidenced by the Commission’s proposal to exempt from fees administrative update applications based on policy grounds.

This is not aimed at amateur radio to kill it. There is a long history and precedent on charging fees for the licensing service involved, just as there is for passports, green cards, drivers’ licenses (issued by states), etc. Better to make pertinent arguments on why the fees would impair the public benefits of the amateur radio service than argue that the whole service might die as a result of a fee that, in fact, is less than the fee many of us paid in the 1960’s and 1970’s.

For background: this proceeding is being handled by staff unfamiliar with amateur radio. It is being handled in the FCC’s Office of Managing Director (OMD), not in the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau where the amateur-specific Part 97 matters are handled. The focus of OMD is accounting budgets and the like for the entire Commission. The fee proposals cover every FCC license and service across the board, and the consideration was directed by Congress. It is recommended that respondents keep “ham jargon” out of the comments, which would not be understood by the intended recipients.

Thank you.

Comments to the Federal Communication Commission may be filed online at: https://www.fcc.gov/ecfs/filings
FCC’s Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS) reference – posting to MD Docket No. 20-270


Interview of the Week

Tom Behler, KB8TYJ, joins us this week for the first part of a new interview talking about the virtual Morse code class. Tom is one of three instructors teaching the class. Tom is both a member and volunteer in the Handiham Program and brings a great deal of experience thanks to his many years as an active ham radio operator. Please join us for the first part of this interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: So, we’ve got Tom here, and we’re going to be talking today about the Morse code class. This is the Handiham Program’s first virtual Morse code class. Many years ago, we used to teach Morse code at Radio Camp in person, and there used to be tapes that we would send out, different forms of material for learning Morse code. Of course, this was back when Morse code was required for a ham radio license, but now we get to learn Morse code because we want to. So, why don’t you tell us a little about the class, Tom?

TB: All right. This is to me a perfect example of how ham radio operators can improvise and make things happen. Again, previously Handihams had done these things in person. Well, we can’t do that now because of the pandemic. There’s no Radio Camp in the near future, so Lucinda had the foresight to say, let’s see if we can put together a Morse code class, virtually, and see how it works out.

TB: So, we started meeting, I want to say back in July, maybe, July or early August, to kind of figure out how to do this. And we pursued a number of options, but the option we kind of decided on has really been working. We have one of our teachers, Jim, KE5AL, who I found out recently had been a computer programmer. He actually developed the program that we can use to send the code. It’s kind of a work in progress, and it was really kind of neat to see it happen. So, we were using the program he created, and it seems to be working out very well.

TB: I don’t know, Lucinda. You can tell me more, but I think there is a core group of about seven to eight students. I think some of the others come and go, but we have a nice core group of students, and they’re all hanging in there.

TB: We have just finished week 4, I believe, and we’re just about through the alphabet letters. We have a few more to do yet. And then we’re going to start numbers, and we’ve been working on prosigns that are used in CW QSOs. And we give them a little bit each week, and we do things like words and sentences. And last week, we had some fun. We got involved with state abbreviations, trying to send those in CW just to give people an idea of what they sounded like. And it was really fun, and I hope it remains fun.

TB: One of the things we don’t want is for this to become a chore or something that people dread doing or facing. We want it to be something that they want to do, and so far, that seems to be working out really well.

LM: And the reality is that the more we can keep learning fun, the more people are engaged and will do the practice that is needed to learn Morse code.

TB: Yeah, and Lucinda’s been really good. You send the recordings. The classes are recorded, and Lucinda sends those recordings out on Tuesdays, I believe it is, and then she follows it up with a practice session for each week. So, everybody has all the material there that they can work with any time they want to.

TB: We tell people, do not set up really long practice sessions for yourself. Just 15 minutes a day, a few times a day. Just keep it alive, play the recordings, work through the things that you’re having trouble with, and that’s what the students seem to be doing. And we will at times present the material and then say, did anybody get that. And I’m surprised that people are getting the stuff. I mean, they’re copying the code. It’s working, and that’s what we like to see.

LM: Yes. It’s exciting to hear people participate and respond and know that they’re learning.

TB: Right, and that’s the thing, and as Lucinda said, people are doing it now because they want to do it. It’s not something that they have to do in order to upgrade their license. And in my view, that makes a huge, huge difference.

LM: Absolutely. You know, it used to be you had to learn Morse code to get that original license, and you had to increase your speed to upgrade. And there was some advantage in that everybody knew Morse code, but that also kept a number of people out of ham radio because of fear of learning Morse code. But now you get to do it simply for the love of it.

TB: And one of the things that we’re trying to get people to see is that it’s nothing to fear, really. Learning Morse code is like learning a language. And if you’re interested in learning the language we call Morse code, and you stick with it, you will get there.

Stay tuned for the next part of our interview with Tom airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

WX4NBC at the National Hurricane Center will Activate, other Resources on Alert

Photo of Hurricane Watch Net logo.

The National Hurricane Center will activate in response to Tropical Storm Zeta today. Surface reports are requested from stations or vessels in the affected area, regardless of weather data. The surface reports play a critical part in helping forecasters understand what is happening in real time on the ground. Currently, the Hurricane Watch Net is in Alert Level 3, Standby Mode, noting that the tropical storm could impact its area of interest within the next two days. Louisiana ARES also goes on alert today in anticipation of the storm. Additionally, the ARRL has prepositioned communications equipment in Louisiana to assist in responding to the storm as needed. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/wx4nhc-at-the-national-hurricane-center-will-activate-other-resources-on-alert


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the new Extra Class pool this week to a question about VFOs.

E7H06 Which of the following oscillator circuits are commonly used in VFOs?

A. Pierce and Zener.
B. Colpitts and Hartley.
C. Armstrong and Deforest..
D. Negative feedback and balanced feedback.

Both the Colpitts and Harley variable frequency oscillators are self-excited, providing continuous, smooth, variable tuning for older VFO transceivers, making answer B the correct choice. If you have a newer radio, however, even though they indicate that they have a VFO, they really have a digitally controlled optical reader. They do behave, however, as though there is a large capacitor behind the tuning dial.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for October 19, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of October 19, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham19OCT2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

Last night, I had the privilege of being a guest on the Blind and Beyond Radio Show, thanks to an invitation from Dave Hillebrandt, W4CI. It was great to share what the Handiham Program is doing and talk about the virtual classes we are planning for next year. You can check out their website at www.blindandbeyondradioshow.org.

We had our third session of the 2020 Morse Code Class last week with John, W2QCY as our instructor. This week, Jim, KE5AL, was the teacher. In addition to a recording of each week’s class session, students also receive a second recording with more practice to help solidify what they learned in class. If this class sounds like something you would like to participate in or if you are interested in an intermediate level Morse code class to increase your speed, you can ask Pemdy to put you on the list for the next classes in 2021.
Photo of the Morse code key.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session in February of 2021. This will be an intermediate level class with more in-depth coverage of topics. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.
Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Invitations have gone out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter and Handiham Notify lists. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new lists at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old lists. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitation. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Just like with the old Handiham World E-letter and Handiham Notify lists, you can’t post emails to the new lists. The lists are only for receiving notifications and E-Letters from the Handiham Program. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can post, ask questions, and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please contact Pemdy.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 10) has an interview about the ARRL’s new Learning Network webinars. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about using widgets with iOS 14, another article about students launching balloons with ham radios onboard, and the final part of a new interview with Diane, KK6LOE, our new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

Using Widgets with iOS 14

Photo of Dot Mini smart device.

With the release of iOS 14, you can now add widgets to your home screen. For the most part, VoiceOver works very well with widgets allowing you to access the information you need more easily than having to ask Siri or enter an app. You can also set up widgets to use with Siri shortcuts. To learn more, watch the following video from Sam at the Blind Life at: https://youtu.be/qrMaD8KxV5E


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

I would like to notify you of a silent key. Don David Taylor, WA0YAH, became a silent key on October 5, 2020, at the age of 80. Don had been a member of Handihams since sometime in the middle 1960’s and until the last couple of years had always checked in to the net. He enjoyed his friends at Handihams and remembered fondly Sister Alverna and Ned Carman. Thank you all.


Interview of the Week

This week, we hear more from Diane Fisher, KK6LOE, our new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. Diane possesses both a love for the hobby and excellent interpersonal skills, making her an obvious choice for net manager. Please join me in welcoming Diane back for the final part of this interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: And there’s all kinds of different modes. There’s so many different things you can do in the hobby, so if one thing isn’t your cup of tea, find the things that are.

DF: Absolutely.

LM: So, this is a great way to introduce you to everybody and let people know that there’s a new Handiham Radio Club net manager. And they know who to contact if they have questions or maybe they want to be a backup net control or whatever. They know who to talk to.

DF. Absolutely, and we’ll do our best to get you in and get you transmitting and all that kind of stuff. And hopefully once I do get my General Class license back, I can kind of study up on some of my question pool knowledge and maybe even Elmer people and get them involved. And you never know, my next step might be a VE position. I’m going to say that would probably be a mid- to long-term goal, but you never know. Who would have thought that I’d be a net manager for an organization that serves hams all over the world.

LM: You just never know where life is going to take you. And we keep all the options on the table, and everything is wide open, and you never know where your path is going to lead.

DF: This is so true.

LM: But I really appreciate you taking the time to share with us and do the interview and everything, and I look forward to continuing to work with you. I hope you are a member of the Program and the Radio Club for years to come.

DF: In fact, I can tell you one thing that I am planning on—I think it’s highly likely that I will become a lifetime member. That’s just going to be one of my things on my bucket list.

LM: Well, we would love to have you. It would be a thrill. Hopefully, you are going to find all kinds of things in the Handiham Program and the Handiham Radio Club that enable you to learn and grow and then be able to give back to others.

DF: Absolutely. That’s the plan!

LM: And, you know, the Handiham net for years has been the place where new hams who, when they started getting comfortable, could try out net control. It was the place where you could try it out. Existing net controls would give up their spot one day just to let a new ham try it.

DF: Sure!

LM: In fact, that’s how I tried it the first time.

DF: Wow!

LM: And it’s always been a place where you did not have to be a perfect net control operator. You could come and learn.

DF: Sure, absolutely, and that’s always a good thing to do, and you don’t have to feel pressured or anything like that, which is one of the things that I really liked. It made it easy to settle into the net control operator role.

LM: Yes. We’ve never tried to make it high pressure where you had to do this perfect, rigid thing. You were to make it your own, have fun, and make it friendly.

DF: Absolutely.

LM: So, there’s a long legacy there of how people developed net control skills. In my case, I developed my net control skills on the Handiham net when I just occasionally filled in as net control. Then, before long, I was running multiple nets in my local community. So, it gave me a platform to practice a little bit and develop a bit of confidence, and then I went and did it regularly at home.

DF: Oh, yeah, and once you learn how to do it, you don’t really forget. It’s kind of like riding a bike. When I did the nets on Wednesdays, back when Michael was net manager, and all of the sudden my equipment died. And it took me a while to come back. But once I worked out my system, I felt like I was comfortable in that position, so it was kind of neat to know that it was a place where nobody was going to look down on me if I messed up a call sign or anything like that, and it gave me the confidence that I needed to continue.

LM: Yes. There’s a lot of hams over the years who have done that, and in that way, you get to carry on this legacy. And that turns around and reaches so any more people because so many develop this skill and go on to serve their local community. They are some pretty big shoes, but I think you are going to do a good job filling them.

DF: Well, thank you, and I do appreciate the opportunity.

LM: Oh, it’s our pleasure, and I know I have already had multiple members in the Program and members in the Radio Club that have reached out to me and are just so excited to have you.

DF: Oh, well, thank you. I am so glad to be here, and it’s really good to be able to help out.

Stay tuned for a new interview airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

Multiple Balloons Carrying Ham Radio Payloads Launched

Photo of teacher helping with balloon launch.

On October 9th, eleven schools located throughout the US launched helium-filled balloons with amateur radio payloads. The balloons can be tracked via ham radio on APRS at 144.39 MHz or 144.34 MHz. The balloons were expected to move eastward at an altitude of 20,000 to 25,000 feet. At least one balloon was reported over the Mediterranean on October 14 at some 40,000 feet. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/multiple-balloons-carrying-ham-radio-payloads-launched


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the General Class pool this week to a question about noise blankers.

G4A16 How does a noise blanker work?

A. By temporarily increasing received bandwidth.
B. By redirecting noise pulses into a filter capacitor.
C. By reducing receiver gain during a noise pulse.
D. By clipping noise peaks.

When you are operating HF, one of the most frustrating noise issues is pulse-type noise, often produced by vehicle ignition systems and other man-made sources. This type of noise is more noticeable when working AM modes, including single sideband (SSB). When you hear that noise, you can eliminate it by using the noise blanker on your transceiver that works by reducing receiver gain during a noise pulse, making answer C the correct choice. Unfortunately, the noise blanker is not helpful in reducing white noise or hash. To help with those forms of noise, modern digital signal processing methods are more effective.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.

A tutorial by Linda Reeder, N7HVF, for the Kenwood TM-V71a is now available in the Manuals and Tutorials section of the members only website


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for October 12, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of October 12, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham12OCT2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

We had our second session of the 2020 Morse Code Class last week with Jim, KE5AL, teaching. This week, John, W2QCY, was our instructor. In addition to a recording of each week’s class session, students also receive a second recording with more practice to help solidify what they learned in class. If this class sounds like something you would like to participate in or if you are interested in an intermediate level Morse code class to increase your speed, you can ask Pemdy to put you on the list for the next classes in 2021.
Photo of the Morse code key.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session in February of 2021. This will be an intermediate level class with more in-depth coverage of topics. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Invitations have gone out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter and Handiham Notify lists. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new lists at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old lists. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitation. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Just like with the old Handiham World E-letter and Handiham Notify lists, you can’t post emails to the new lists. The lists are only for receiving notifications and E-Letters from the Handiham Program. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can post, ask questions, and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please contact Pemdy.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 10) has an interview about the ARRL’s new Learning Network webinars. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about accessibility improvements with iOS 14, another article about astronauts earning their ham radio licenses, and the next part of a new interview with Diane, KK6LOE, our new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

Accessibility with iOS 14

Photo of Dot Mini smart device.

With the release of iOS 14, there are some new accessibility options for people who have newer iPhones and iPads. The new back tap feature allows users to replace screen gestures that could be tricky for people with cognitive or motor disabilities. The new sound recognition feature can be helpful for people who are hard of hearing or deaf, allowing the device to monitor for several different sounds such as a crying baby, the doorbell, or even sirens. Additionally, FaceTime will be able to detect when someone is using sign language and will focus on that person to allow for improved communication. While each of the improvements were designed for people with disabilities, in reality, they can be useful for users of all abilities. You can learn more by watching a video from Sam at the Blind Life at: https://youtu.be/7aCZgl4BDRU


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi everyone,

Alpha Antenna just released a new antenna called the HOA Buster. You can check it out at https://alphaantenna.com/product/hf-gutter-antenna-for-10-through-80-meters/ It turns a gutter into a vertical which covers 80-10 meters. How interesting!

73,

Austin, KA3TTT


Interview of the Week

This week, we hear more from Diane Fisher, KK6LOE, our new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. Diane possesses both a love for the hobby and excellent interpersonal skills, making her an obvious choice for net manager. Please join me in welcoming Diane back for the next part of this interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: I think there’s a lot of good stuff to come, and I think it’s going to be neat to watch the radio club get more active with members participating on a regular basis and feeling like they have a way of giving back.

DF: Absolutely. And that’s kind of why I jumped into this with both feet. I feel like I have nothing but time on my hands to give. I have a very limited income, but I do have time and a little bit of know-how to give.

LM: Yes, and when you think about the legacy of ham radio—who steps in when emergencies happen. This is the legacy of ham radio that we give back as hams. It’s what we do. We give back not only to the hobby but to the general public as well.

DF: Oh, sure, we do help in health and welfare situations. In fact, in ’96, I don’t know if it made national headlines, but there was a firebug who had started a fire around the Reno-Sparks area, which was where I lived at the time. They called it the Belli Ranch Fire, and, oh, what a mess. We could have had two cities go up in a puff of smoke, and fortunately, I was able to get a friend to drive me to The Salvation Army where they had radio equipment set up and scanners and this and that. And I could report back what I heard from the fire fighters to the community, to the ham community, so that it could be passed along. And it was just a really rewarding thing to know that there was going to be somebody that could help in a situation like that.

LM: Yes, absolutely. So, with the Handiham Radio Club, we’re just carrying on that tradition.

DF: Hey, that’s great, and what a tradition. And I think we also need to keep the radio alive, the radio hobby alive, because what people don’t realize is, they say they can just use their cell phone. But what if those cell phone towers go down? If those towers go down, all you have is radio. And really, it all comes full circle, because even if you’re using those towers, you’re still transmitting radio waves whether you realize it or not.

LM: Yeah, I think a lot of people don’t stop to think about how a cell phone actually works.

DF: Exactly.

LM: It’s transmitting on a frequency.

DF: And people don’t think a lot about when those towers go down, it’s going to be the hams who are going to come out and are able to help out in situations, to kind of calm the waters a little bit.

LM: Yes, and it can happen at any time. You think about when that big tornado hit in Joplin, and suddenly the only communications that were available was amateur radio.

DF: Yeah, and my Mom lived in Joplin at that time.

LM: Wow. I was volunteering for The Salvation Army and was staffing a canteen that went from West Michigan down there to help.

DF: Wow.

LM: And the first net that got going after that tornado hit, I believe it was an 11 or 12 year old girl that was running it.

DF: Wow, it just goes to show that anybody can run a net, and somebody who had the gumption and know-how did it. It’s kind of neat to see our young people getting involved in ham radio.

LM: Yes, here was a girl with a ham radio license and the knowledge and who was not afraid to step up and help.

DF: Absolutely, and that’s what this is all about.

LM: So, is there anything else you would like to add for listeners and readers of Handiham World.

DF: Well, I’d love to continue to see the organization grow and get out there and get people to learn about ham radio because we want to also keep our frequencies. We don’t want to lose them. The more we educate people about ham radio, the less likely we are to lose some of our band privileges.

DF: And I’m really excited about the, and unfortunately, I didn’t register, for the Morse Code Class. I don’t have an oscillator, but it would be fun to do. And even though the code requirement has been eliminated, it is kind of neat to see people learning that, and hopefully we can bring it back.

DF: But as far as the hobby, the more people we can get involved with ham radio, I think that it can help a lot in disastrous situations, and the more people that know about it the better.

LM: Absolutely. And get on there, and use those frequencies. What you said is so true—if we don’t use them, we lose them. There are plenty of commercial entities that would love more spectrum, so we’ve got to prove that we’re going to use what we’ve got. And get that license, and key that mic!

DF: Absolutely.

Stay tuned for the final part of our interview with Diane airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

Two More Astronauts Earn Amateur Radio Licenses

Photo of ARISS logo.

Even though the Johnson Space Center lockdown postponed amateur radio training over the past several months, NASA ISS Ham Project Coordinator Kenneth Ransom, N5VHO, was able to work with all the new astronaut-class graduates while also offering refresher courses for those astronauts already licensed. Astronauts who are licensed are able to operate the ISS ham radio equipment without restrictions, and they often participate in ARISS contacts with schools and groups on Earth. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/two-more-astronauts-earn-amateur-radio-licenses


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the Technician Class pool this week to a question about receive filter bandwidth for CW.

T4B10 Which of the following is an appropriate receive filter bandwidth for minimizing noise and interference for CW reception?

A. 500 Hz.
B. 1000 Hz.
C. 2400 Hz.
D. 5000 Hz.

When operating Morse code, we limit the bandwidth to just 500 Hz, and sometimes even less, making answer A the correct choice. This narrow bandwidth leaves more room for people to operate this mode, which is one of the advantages to learning CW. On most newer HF rigs, a 500 Hz CW filter is automatically selected when you switch to CW mode. It’s a good idea to check your manual, however, since not all rigs do this. Sometimes, it can be helpful to use a wider filter even when you are in CW mode; and the better rigs will let you choose the appropriate filter, so you can accommodate these unusual operating conditions.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.

An audio demonstration of QLog is now available in the Manuals and Tutorials section of the members only website. Many thanks to John Farina, W2QCY, for providing these recordings.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for October 5, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of October 5, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham05OCT2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

We had our first session of the 2020 Morse Code Class last week, and the instructors and students quickly got the hang of using the virtual platform. Tom, KB8TYJ, did an excellent job as our first week’s instructor. This week, Jim, KE5AL, another member of the instructor team, is teaching. In addition to a recording of the class session, students also got another recording with more practice to help solidify what they learned last week. If this class sounds like something you would like to participate in, you can ask Pemdy to put you on the list for the next class in 2021.
Photo of the Morse code key.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session in February of 2021. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Invitations have gone out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter and Handiham Notify lists. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new lists at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old lists. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitation. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Just like with the old Handiham World E-letter and Handiham Notify lists, you can’t post emails to the new lists. The lists are only for receiving notifications and E-Letters from the Handiham Program. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can post, ask questions, and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please contact Pemdy.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 9) has more information about properly tuning signals on the HF bands along with some information on transceiver tools that will improve your listening. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about the Dot Mini smart device, another article about slow-scan television being transmitted from the ISS, and the next part of a new interview with Diane, KK6LOE, our new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

Dot Mini: Smart Device for the Visually Impaired

Photo of Dot Mini smart device.

The Dot Mini allows people who are blind or visually impaired to access books and audio with ease. Content can be loaded from an SD card or via USB. Dot Mini has a 16 cell braille display, and, using the integrated translator engine, Dot Mini can provide access to millions of e-books in braille. Not just a braille device, the integrated audio gives the user more options. The device is lightweight and compact, making it convenient to carry, yet it has 8 GB of internal storage. Because Dot Mini uses open source technology, capabilities will expand over time. You can learn more by going to their website at: https://www.dotincorp.com/dot-mini


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Lucinda and all,

I was pleasantly surprised to read about myself in the September 28 issue of Handiham World! Thank you for your kind words. I actually included a sentence in my bio for the ARRL article that mentioned my involvement with Handiham, but unfortunately it was omitted.

Let’s hope that next year can bring about an in-person Radio Camp!

73,

Phil, K9HI


Hi Lucinda and all,

In my hands I am holding a braille book, but this book is a first. It’s an antenna book! It’s called Small Antennas for Small Spaces, and it’s by Steve Ford, WB8IMY. I bought the print copy from ARRL and then sent it to Midwestern Braille Volunteers. They are a non-profit organization providing braille transcription of printed material. They also provide embossing services for material already transcribed into braille. They can work from several computer file formats or from print copies. Their website is www.mbvol.org.

So, now I am reading this excellent antenna book. It’s in six volumes, and it was under $200 to get it brailled. So, if you want to read that book, they have the file and will braille it on request. In my opinion, you should go for it. I think you’ll love the book. I couldn’t put it down. I read two volumes in just the last 24 hours!

73,

Trippy, AC8S


Interview of the Week

This week, we hear more from Diane Fisher, KK6LOE, our new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. Diane possesses both a love for the hobby and excellent interpersonal skills, making her an obvious choice for net manager. Please join me in welcoming Diane back for the next part of this interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: So, you ended up with a membership in the Handiham Program, and right away, you got a job in the Handiham Radio Club. What’s next for you?

DF: I guess the sky’s the limit. In fact, one of the things that’s really cool is that tomorrow night on one of the team talk chat servers in the blind community called, Out of Sight, I’m doing an event, and it turns out perfect because what we’re going to talk about is technology, the new technology that ham radio has to offer and its accessibility to blind people.

DF: And just this morning, I was made aware, and I haven’t had a chance to listen to the latest Amateur Radio Newsline report, but there’s a blind net now on Echolink, so, how timely!

LM: That’s great! And one of the things that happened after the Handiham Program got up and going again after we had about a year and a half where the Program was kind of in limbo when Pat Tice had retired and before I came on board, one of the things that happened was that we moved from being under the Sports and Rec Department in what used to be Courage Center, now it’s Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute—we ended up moved to under the Assistive Technology Department. And it has been such an interesting and, I think, very well fitting move because now we are in a department that focused on what can be done to make things work for people with all kinds of disabilities, and it just fits so well with what this Program does.

DF: Wow. That is awesome. You guys have done so much—Handiham has done so much for disabled hams, not just the blind. You have people with varying differences in disabilities as well as varying degrees of disability. And it’s so neat that there is an organization available to them, or to us—to all of us—and it’s just a really refreshing thing to know.

LM: It’s kind of neat because we are unique. There’s no other organization in amateur radio that is specifically focused on serving people with disabilities. And the Program is also unique, considering this year we celebrated our 53rd anniversary. Non-profit programs don’t usually get to celebrate anniversaries that far along. And we’re just growing. The Program is getting busier with more members and more people getting more active, which is a great problem to have.

DF: Oh, yes. Absolutely.

LM: It is really neat to see all that is happening and changing and growing, even in the middle of a pandemic. We were uniquely suited to grow things a little differently. We had to limit our in-person activities for this year because of that, but we started implementing other activities which were virtual-based, and so the Program just continues to grow and get bigger.

LM: And the radio club is now getting more active. For people who don’t know, the Handiham Radio Club didn’t used to do a whole lot. They met once a year at Radio Camp, and that didn’t leave a whole lot of options for activity. And, when I became Radio Club president, this was a number of years ago, I suggested that we ought to be more like a typical club and have regular meetings.

LM: And so, we started working on that, and we had quarterly meetings for a few years using a program that allowed people to dial in to one number and talk to each other. But technology wasn’t the greatest. And it meant that often people were not able to hear, or they were trying to talk, and it wasn’t picking them up. So, then when I got this job, I, of course, had to resign from my position as president, and so it went to the vice president, which was Linda, N7HVF.

LM: And then last year at Radio Camp, Linda was reelected as president. And she has been president at different times throughout the years, so she comes to the position with a lot of experience, which is nice because we have a couple of new people. Tom Behler, KB8TYJ, who is vice president, and John Glass, NU6P, who is secretary are both new to the Radio Club. So, Linda comes in with all kinds of experience, and the other guys come in with a whole lot of life experience that can support Linda, so it’s kind of a really good mix.

LM: One of the things I realized this summer when we got our Zoom account was that we could go back to holding regular Radio Club meetings via Zoom. While it still got a little bit crazy just because of how many people were there, we were able to use the Zoom controls to start muting people, so others could still hear what was going on and communicate with each other. And I think as we do more of those meetings, we are going to get better at it.

DF: Oh, absolutely.

LM: It’s just neat to be able to offer more regular club meetings and having the club get more active. And moving the club mailing list—we had an old email list that wasn’t that convenient, and moving the list to Groups.io is another way of helping the club become more active, letting club members support each other. We have really talented people in the Handiham Program membership. There’s just a lot of really talented people.

DF: Yeah, you’ve got musicians, you’ve got all kinds of people—and tech savvy people. I like to think of myself as tech savvy, and I’m noticing there are a lot of talented people as well.

LM: And the more we can let members know that they can ask their questions directly on the Radio Club email list, the better. Instead of getting just one opinion from me, they can get input from multiple different people with different disabilities. Or maybe they can even get an opinion from somebody who has the same disability they have, which means even more.

LM: So, there’s some pretty neat stuff coming along here as things change, and again because of kind of being forced a little bit. Originally, we were planning to have Radio Camp, but then we couldn’t. We realized that things have to change right now, and we had to look at ways we could still make things happen and have it be good.

DF: It goes along with that old saying: If life gives you lemons, make lemonade. And I think there’s a lot of lemonade going around.

LM: Oh, yeah! There’s a lot of lemonade being made in the Handiham Program, and it’s really good.

Stay tuned for the next part of our interview with Diane airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

An ARISS Slow-Scan TV Event from the ISS is Scheduled

Photo of ARISS logo.

An Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) slow-scan television (SSTV) event from the ISS began on October 4th and is scheduled to run through October 8. Of course, the dates and times are subject to change if necessary due to priorities on the ISS. The main theme in the images transmitted will be satellites. Hams who participate in the event can post and view images on the ARISS SSTV Gallery. Additionally, after your image is posted, you can get a special award by following the instructions provided. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/an-ariss-slow-scan-tv-event-from-the-iss-is-scheduled


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the new Extra Class pool this week to a question about analog to digital conversion.

E7F05 How frequently must an analog signal be sampled by an analog-to-digital converter so that the signal can be accurately reproduced?

A. At least half the rate of the highest frequency component of the signal.
B. At least twice the rate of the highest frequency component of the signal.
C. At the same rate as the highest frequency component of the signal.
D. At four times the rate of the highest frequency component of the signal.

According to the Nyquist sampling theorem, you need to sample the analog signal at twice the rate of the highest frequency signal, making answer B the correct choice. Don’t forget, if you are sampling a square wave, you will have odd harmonics that are well above the base frequency that also need to be included.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.

The October issue of the QCWA Journal is now available in mp3 audio in the magazines and newsletters section of the members only website.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for September 28, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of September 28, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham28SEP2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

The big day is finally here! After talking about the upcoming Morse code class for months, the first session takes place tonight. We have a great group of students, and the instructors are excited about teaching over the next twelve weeks. This is also a big commitment for the students who will need to spend time daily practicing what they learn in class each week. Of course, class admission is now closed, so if you didn’t sign up for this one and still want to learn Morse code, you can ask Pemdy to put you on the list for the next class in 2021.
Photo of the Morse code key.

Phil Temples, K9HI, is a name familiar to many Radio Camp attendees from over the years. And a volunteer instructor, Phil enjoyed writing interesting and challenging emergency communications exercises for use during camp. Congratulations are in order as Phil was just appointed New England Division Vice Director by the ARRL. Phil has been a ham for some 50 years. He has written articles for QST and even co-authored a chapter in the Amateur Radio Public Service Handbook that features three Handiham Program members. We wish Phil all the best as he continues to promote amateur radio and provide service through the hobby.
Photo of the Phil Temples, K9HI, at Radio Camp during an emergency communications exercise.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session, likely in January of 2021. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Please keep watching for invitations to all the new lists. Invitations have gone out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter list. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new list at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old list. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitation. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can ask questions and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please send an email to Pemdy.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 9) has more information about properly tuning signals on the HF bands along with some information on transceiver tools that will improve your listening. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about the Claro ScanPen app that reads text aloud, another article about some hams in Iowa who helped find two missing children, and the next part of a new interview with Diane, KK6LOE, our new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

Claro ScanPen App

Photo of Claro ScanPen logo.

The Claro ScanPen App can scan and read text like many other apps, but it is more of an expert at reading text on objects and in non-standard printed documents. While it can’t read everything, the Claro ScanPen app can read text on shiny backgrounds, curved objects, low contrast print, and also some cursive text. It can even read some handwriting. The app does not require an internet connection, and it performs these skills at no additional cost. You can check out a review of the app at: https://ndassistive.org/blog/claro-scanpen-for-android-scan-read-text-on-objects-for-free/

You can read more about the Android app at: https://www.clarosoftware.com/portfolio/claro-scanpen-android/

You can learn more about the iOS app at: https://www.clarosoftware.com/portfolio/claro-scanpen/


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi Lucinda and all,

I really enjoyed Pete’s letter in the E-letter last week. I have also spent a lot of time on VHF and UHF. For working scatter, I also used a homemade audio device that you would set to the top of the minute with WWV. This was made by a ham friend, Chris, N0JCF. I haven’t talked to him in many years, but the timer is still operational in my shack. Unfortunately, it doesn’t get used much anymore.

I sure would like to bring back working SSB meteor scatter. So, if anyone reading this has a reasonable 2 meter or, I should say, 6 meters and above station, they’re welcome to contact me, and we can try it on anything from 6 meters on up.

I have not worked scatter above two meters, but, yes, I have worked meteor scatter on 10 meters—always random during the early morning of the ARRL 10 meter contest in December. It’s usually during a shower.

I really want to try with someone on 222 MHz. I have worked aurora on 222 and also on 432 MHz but never meteor scatter. You can contact me directly at my call at ARRL.net

And when I say a reasonable station, I mean something like at least 100 watts and some kind of horizontal antenna. I run around 100 watts with a 7 element beam on 6 meters. I also run 100 watts into a 17 element beam on 2 meters. On 222, I am running around 100 watts into a 10 element beam. On 432, I am running 100 watts into a 16 element beam. The antennas are on my 50 foot tower.

I hope to hear more people on VHF.

Thanks and 73,

Matt, KA0PQW


Hi all,

Are there any blind hams out there who use D-star? I’m asking because a ham said on his QRZ page that he used D-star in the Winter Field Day. So, obviously, contesting can be done on D-star. So, I thought I’d ask if any blind hams use D-star and how do they use it.

If any blind hams have experience like this, please send a reply to be put in the mailbag, and I’ll contact you.

73,

Trippy, AC8S


Interview of the Week

This week, we hear more from Diane Fisher, KK6LOE, our new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. Diane possesses both a love for the hobby and excellent interpersonal skills, making her an obvious choice for net manager. Please join me in welcoming Diane back for the next part of this interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: How did you initially find out about the Handiham Program?

DF: I was originally licensed in ’91. My call sign was KB0JQA. And I had heard about the Handiham organization, but I didn’t take an active part in it. I had heard that they helped disabled hams find equipment and things like that, but back then you didn’t have things like Echolink, so there was no net to check into, unless there was one on HF—and there probably was, but I didn’t have any equipment, and I lived in an apartment, so that was pretty tough.

DF: But I had heard from other blind hams who had gotten equipment, beam direction detectors and things like that, so I was thinking that it would be something interesting to find out about. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a chance to pursue it, even after I had upgraded to Tech Plus and then to General.

DF: And then, fast forward many years, my license ended up expiring in 2003, I think, because you have the grace period, or no, it would be 2004. So, there were many personal reasons that unfortunately my license ended up lapsing. Well, fast forward a few more years yet again to 2014 when my late partner, Tim, and I decided we would study together and get relicensed.

DF: So, we did, and then we found out about Echolink and the Handiham Conference Server. It was just amazing to see all kinds of different people with different disabilities coming together and joining these nets. And so, it kind of put us into a little bit more active role as ham operators once again and kind of rekindled my love for ham radio.

DF: When I was little, I had always had an interest in how radio waves worked back in the days when I used to DX on the AM broadcast band at night. If I missed an episode of Radio Mystery Theater, I could always tune it in whether it faded in and out or not. I didn’t care! It was kind of neat to learn about the dynamics of radio and how it works, how different bands work during different times of the day and that. And that just to me was a very fascinating and exciting thing to explore.

LM: Yes. You’re back in ham radio now, and you said you got back in 2014?

DF: Yes, I was relicensed as a Tech in 2014. I’m hoping to reinstate my old General Class license that I got back in 1992. Now, whether I get my old call sign back, that’s not quite as big a deal to me. I love my 6 call, so I may just keep that, if the FCC will allow that.

LM: What is the process that you have to go through to get that license back?

DF: I think I just have to let them know to look up that old call sign and probably pay $15 to get that back.

LM: Okay. That would be great!

DF: Yes, definitely. If what I am hearing is true, then probably before long I’ll have my old General Class license back, which would be great!

LM: Absolutely! Keep us informed, and we’ll watch for that. So, you’ve just had the net manager position for a few weeks, since the meeting earlier in September, but do you have any goals or any thoughts about what you want to see happen with the Handiham net?

DF: Absolutely. I’d like to see more YLs check in. I think it’s awesome that a lot of people—it’s kind of neat because I’ve seen kind of a jump in net activity. But I think YLs out there need to know that this is not just a man’s hobby, so I’d love to see more YLs check into the nets. I know there are quite a few who check into my good friend, Doug’s net, who also lives here in Sacramento, but the net is open to YLs at the midday net as well as the evenings. So, I’d love to see YLs check into these nets as well.

LM: Yes, that would be great. And if you look at our typical camp population, usually we have about a third female to two-thirds male, but we could change that.

DF: Well, you have to start somewhere. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with girls getting their licenses, and having said that, it would be nice to see them become more, as we hams call it, radio-active.

LM: Yes! Absolutely. And I love to see the increased education in STEM.

DF: Oh, absolutely.

LM: I think that opens doors and just makes more things possible for anyone who gets into amateur radio.

DF: Oh, sure.

Stay tuned for the next part of our interview with Diane airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

Hams Help Find Kids by Monitoring FRS Radios

Photo of two FRS radios made for kids.

On Wednesday of last week, police received a call alerting them that two children, who were playing with FRS radios, had been missing for about an hour. Several officers were dispatched to conduct a visual search that was unsuccessful. The officer in charge, a ham, wanted to listen for the children on his handheld, but without his manual, he was unable to program the frequency. Listening to his local 2 meter repeater, he heard the regularly scheduled traffic net. After checking in, he explained the situation, and several stations started monitoring the FRS frequency. A short time later, one of the hams reported hearing the kids, and, after confirming the information, the officer in charge directed responding officers to the new search location where the children were subsequently located. The most surprising part of the situation, according to the officer in charge, was that the children were found in a different direction and area then they were presumed to be. Thanks to the quick thinking of several ham radio operators, there was a happy ending. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/hams-help-find-kids-by-monitoring-frs-radios


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the new General Class pool this week to a question about HF mobile stations.

G4E05 Which of the following most limits an HF mobile installation?

A. Picket fencing.
B. The wire gauge of the DC power line to the transceiver.
C. Efficiency of the electrically short antenna.
D. FCC rules limiting mobile output power on the 75-meter band.

When 75 meter propagation goes long after dark, it is a great spot for making contacts more than 1,000 miles away. If you want to make those contacts from your mobile station, however, you will be limited by the efficiency of your electrically short antenna, making answer C the correct choice. On bands like 40 and 80 meters, no mobile antenna is efficient. All are electrically shortened and will operate at a loss. To offset this limitation, use the largest low-loss antenna coil loading system you can get.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for September 21, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of September 21, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham21SEP2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

The instructor team for the upcoming Morse code class has been hard at work getting ready for the first session next Monday. Class admission is now closed, so if you didn’t sign up for this one and still want to learn Morse code, you can ask Pemdy to put you on the list for the next class in 2021. We look forward to meeting all the students and having fun with Morse code over the next twelve weeks.
Photo of the Morse code key.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session, likely in January of 2021. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Please keep watching for invitations to all the new lists. Invitations have gone out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter list. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new list at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old list. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitation. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can ask questions and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please send an email to Pemdy.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 9) has more information about properly tuning signals on the HF bands along with some information on transceiver tools that will improve your listening. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about the In Your Pocket software to make a smart phone blind accessible, another article about the FCC waiver for hams involved in communications related to the hurricanes and wildfires, and the first part of a new interview with Diane, KK6LOE, our new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

Voice Activated Assistive Tech to Improve Accessibility for Users with Sight Loss

Photo of Samsung smart phone running In Your Pocket software.

In Your Pocket is an easy to use phone and media device that uses natural speech and is designed specifically for people who are blind or have low vision. It is a voice controlled smart device that is designed to be simple to use yet of great value to people living with sight loss and blindness. The software is installed on a Samsung smart phone, and it completely takes over the phone. More than just a phone for the blind, using your voice you can make phone calls, search for and stream audio books from five libraries, read today’s newspapers, get navigation or sight assistance, and much, much more. You can check out the website at: https://thiis.co.uk/voice-activated-assistive-tech-to-improve-accessibility-for-users-with-sight-loss/

You can watch the video about the software at: https://youtu.be/2Uia8lEPA6c


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi Lucinda and all,

I’m Pete, K1PXE, and I’m back again. Actually, I really never left. I just kind of focused away from Handihams. When Pat was editing the newsletter, I read the newsletter each week, and I even made some contributions from time to time. After the newsletter restarted, I read them for several issues, and for no particular reason, I stopped reading them. But, I have saved every issue figuring that someday something would happen that I would need to find out about in the newsletter.

A couple weeks ago, that thing happened. I got the email from groups.io inviting me to join the Handiham World email list. It really didn’t say much so, I went back to the newsletter. So, I joined, and I have received two welcoming emails.

Anyway, back to the newsletter. I’m glad to hear that Handihams is still doing great things. One thing got my attention really quick. In Pat’s time, I always enjoyed “a dip in the pool,” and I am glad to see that feature back again. I have read the newsletters back to my birthday in June, and I’m enjoying catching up on things. Of course, I have been answering all of the dip in the pool questions. So far, including the letter for June 14th about polar coordinates, I have one wrong, and that was only because I was just too smart for myself.

I have been working meteor scatter on 2 meters for a long time. My first meteor scatter QSO was on July 18, 1971 with K0MQS when I tailed his sked with WA1JTK. We caught a 2 minute burst. Two QSOs can easily be completed in one burst. I don’t believe there was a meteor shower at the time by personal experience and conformation from others that the month of July is a great time for random meteors. In fact, my latest meteor scatter contact was with my friend Gary, N1GC, in EM95 on July 7 this year.

Meteor bursts on 2 meters are often very short, lasting from just a ping to several seconds. It is necessary to ensure that both stations are not transmitting or receiving at the same time during a sked. My friend, Dan, formerly WA1SFC, good with electromechanical devices, built one for me consisting of a clock motor, an erector set wheel, and a micro switch. He took the wheel and ground it down a bit in two 90 degree segments on opposite sides of the wheel. He mounted the wheel on the second hand center shaft on the clock motor and mounted the switch so it would brush the edge of the wheel. The switch would be on for 15 seconds and then off for the next 15 seconds and back to on again, repeating the sequence forever. I used that sequencer successfully for skeds for a number of years.

Dan is a pretty talented guy. When they came out with the logic integrated circuits (I think it was the 7400 series), he learned how to use them. He taught me about divide by 2, divide by 10, and I don’t remember what else. I also need a J-K flip-flop for a divide by 3 circuit. Dan worked for the telephone company and used wire wrap construction, and he taught me about it. He got me a wire wrap tool and made me a wire unwrap tool (so I could correct my mistakes), so I could avoid the problem of trying to solder to an IC socket. So, with all this knowledge, I was able to design and build a totally electronic device to perform the same function as Dan’s electromechanical device. I used my sequencer for many years, but it now sits on the shelf. These days, hams are making meteor scatter schedules using high speed digital data to take best advantage of the short bursts. Nevertheless, there are times one can catch a random burst for a QSO, and I am sure I could find someone to run one with using SSB or CW. In that case, I can always grab my BrailleSense U2, turn it off and on again to sync the time to the internet, display the time, and read the braille display to tell me when to transmit or receive.

Enough of that! Back to the question. I said to myself (sometimes I do talk to myself), they probably want 6 meters, but there still is the characteristic of longer bursts for longer wavelength. I remembered a book I read that talked about early meteor scatter work at the famous Jodrell Bank Observatory. I think they were talking about 10 meters. I’ll go with 10 meters, and find the book

I keep a list of the books that I have read that goes back to 2008. I tried several search terms and finally went with astro. I got a bunch of books with astronaut in the title which didn’t surprise me. I am really interested in human space flight, and I have lots of recordings, and I read over a dozen books in the Apollo 11 50 year anniversary. I found the book I wanted, Astronomer by Chance, by Bernard Lovell. I read it in 2016. I don’t erase the books when I have read them. I store them on an external drive. I brought back the book and started reading at chapter 7. The book tells of acquiring World War II military surplus radar gear and setting up at Jodrell Bank and the first recorded meteor scatter. I think the book will be really interesting to hams, and I strongly recommend it. The book number on BARD is DB31614.

Well, I was wrong about 10 meters. The radar gear was on 4 meters. I believe I read in another book that early coastal radar in England was on a longer wave length, and I guess that confused me. So, the question is, does meteor scatter exist on 10 meters, and what are the characteristics?

I kind of got even with that question with the one about chordal hop propagation. I never heard of it. But I am pretty good at math, so maybe I can figure it out. A chord intersects a circle at two points. Answer A talks of great circle. Maybe that is it. No, not quite right. The one that talks of refracting from point rather than point back to ground. That is the answer I chose. The description of the answer talked about 80 meters, but I would think that Sporadic E on 6 meters double hop and triple hop without a return to ground would be the same thing.

I took my Extra Class back in 1988. I believe a test is not the end of it. In the test you showed what you know. It also showed what you are responsible for. You are still responsible for that stuff years later. It’s like a driving test. Just because you passed the test, you can’t just forget everything. Indeed not. If you forget what you learned while learning how to drive, you will be in serious trouble.

So, “a dip in the pool” can be lots of fun, cause you to think, and is kind of a reality check on what you know or can figure out. For the reader, it is easy to do. For the editor it is a bit more of an effort, but there is one editor and many of us. So, Lucinda, thanks for “a dip in the pool”.

73,

Pete, K1PXE


Interview of the Week

This week, we begin a new interview with Diane Fisher, KK6LOE, our new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. Diane possesses both a love for the hobby and excellent interpersonal skills, making her an obvious choice for net manager. Please join me in welcoming Diane for the first part of this interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

DF: So, this is going to be exciting—the first one-on-one Zoom meeting I’ve ever been to!

LM: Well, you know with COVID, we’re learning to do all kinds of things.

DF: Oh, yeah. Things are kind of new and interesting now.

LM: And it’s interesting because we have technology that now allows us to do so many different things. I think about if this pandemic had hit thirty years ago, how different our lives would look.

DF: Oh, yeah. Absolutely.

LM: You know, thirty years ago, not very many people had computers, and we didn’t have access to the internet, and the thought of having these kinds of meetings was unheard of. Back then, we didn’t even have unlimited phone.

DF: Oh no! Back then, you had to have beaucoup bucks to even have a cell phone.

LM: And it was those old bag phones.

DF: Oh, yeah. I remember those with the big rubber duckies.

LM: I remember one with an antenna that went on the roof of your car.

DF: Oh, yeah.

LM: It was such a different world!

DF: Tell me about it.

LM: So, in a way, I’m really thankful that the pandemic didn’t hit thirty years ago and that we have had more time to develop technology that has supported us in being able to have more life than we would have been able to have otherwise.

DF: Isn’t that the truth.

LM: I think about, even for me, I can very easily get groceries delivered. Back then, that wasn’t an option.

DF: Yeah, I think some of the grocery stores were starting to deliver, but you sure didn’t have the apps where you could order ahead. You had to call on the land line and take care of that, and even then, sometimes, you weren’t guaranteed to get all the groceries that you wanted.

LM: Things have changed, and it definitely supports us in a different way. We didn’t have Amazon back then. There are so many things now that I can order, and it’s here in a couple of days.

DF: Absolutely.

LM: So, I am very grateful for the things we have now that we didn’t have then.

DF: Something that we call our modern conveniences.

LM: And it helps to survive the situation we are in now.

DF: Oh, sure.

LM: It’s still hard on people. It’s taking its toll. I definitely can see that.

DF: Oh, sure. Well, we’re not meant to be isolated. And then you add all the stuff going on in the world right now. People’s nerves have just been stretched to the breaking point, and I think it is just really making people uptight. So, it’s good that we have something to help bring us down a little bit from that.

LM: Yes. People need distractions where they can engage their mind in something productive.

DF: Absolutely, which kind of segues into what we are here for. Because John Glass—it happened right after I had retired my guide dog. I was in tears when I was talking to him, telling him how much I missed her, Jane. She was a yellow lab and golden retriever mix, and I hadn’t had her long, which made it even more sad. I’d had her almost three years, so that was a welcome distraction. He asked me, he said, Handiham is looking for a net manager, and I was thinking, wait a minute. I don’t know if I have the equipment to do this if I have to monitor the AllStar and the DMR. And he said, oh, no, it doesn’t involve anything like that. All we need is somebody to oversee the nets and make sure everything runs smoothly. It was like, okay, that doesn’t sound like too much of an undertaking. So, I thought, why not? I’ve got nothing but time, and I had already offered to do net control and things like that, so if it works into something higher, if that’s what’s expected of me, we’ll see if I’m the one that can measure up to that. So, here I am, and I’m glad to be of service.

LM: Well, we’re really excited to have you as the new Handiham Radio Club Net Manager. And we try to keep this position workable because we do have a lot of nets. You don’t have to attend every net. It’s not like it’s a once a week thing.

DF: Sure.

LM: It’s having that one person that people can go to if they have questions or if they want to change out a net control slot, just having someone they can talk to about it. That’s a huge help and a way you get to help support the club. So, it’s a great service that you are doing.

DF: Well, thank you. I’m glad to be a part of it.

Stay tuned for a new interview airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

FCC Grants ARRL Rules Waiver Request for Fire Emergencies, Hurricanes

Photo of FCC logo.

The FCC has granted the ARRL’s request for a temporary waiver to allow amateur data transmissions at a higher symbol rate than currently permitted under part 97 rules. The waiver supports hurricane and wildfire relief communications in both the US and its territories. The waiver applies to hams directly involved with hurricane and wildfire relief who are using PACTOR 3 and PACTOR 4 emissions in the continental US and Puerto Rico and is limited to 60 days. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/fcc-grants-arrl-rules-waiver-request-for-fire-emergencies-hurricanes


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the Technician Class pool this week to a question about radio range.

T3A12 How might fog and light rain affect radio range on the 10 meter and 6 meter bands?

A. Fog and rain absorb these wavelength bands.
B. Fog and light rain will have little effect on these bands.
C. Fog and rain will deflect these signals.
D. Fog and rain will increase radio range.

Fog and rain will have very little impact on most radio signals below the UHF range, making answer B the correct choice. 220 MHz could be an exception, where precipitation starts to have a noticeable effect. If you are operating on the microwave bands, however, fog and rain can cause tremendous negative impacts on radio range.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for September 14, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of September 14, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham14SEP2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

The Handiham Program is pleased to announce the winner of our 2020 Morse Code Class early registration drawing. To accomplish this important task, Pemdy enlisted the help of Diego, a fearless feline who was happy to assist.

Photo of Diego looking over the pile of names to choose from.

Diego took his duties seriously as he chose the winner.

Photo of Diego separating one name from the pile.

And the winner is Darren Tomblin! Congratulations to you, and your Morse code key and oscillator will be going out in the mail later this week.

Photo of the piece of paper Diego picked as the winner.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session, likely in January of 2021. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Please keep watching for invitations to all the new lists. Invitations have gone out to everyone on the old Handiham E-letter list. If you haven’t received one, please contact Pemdy for assistance. Once you are subscribed to the new list at Groups.io, you will be unsubscribed from the old list. All you have to do to subscribe is reply and send when you receive the invitation. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can ask questions and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information. If you are a Handiham Program member and would like to join the Handiham Radio Club email list, please send an email to Pemdy.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 9) has more information about properly tuning signals on the HF bands along with some information on transceiver tools that will improve your listening. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about navigating the Zoom platform, another article about the latest Hurricane Watch Net activation, and the final part of a new interview with another of the participants from the recent virtual Get on the Air class. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

Virtual Instruction: Zoom Video Conferencing Platform

Photo of Zoom logo.

With the increased use of Zoom for virtual learning, meetings, and even social interactions, it is important to understand how to access all the tools offered on the platform. To help people learn the keyboard shortcuts and navigate the program, Perkins created a helpful post and video. You can check out the website at: https://www.perkinselearning.org/technology/blog/virtual-instruction-zoom-video-conferencing-platform

You can watch the video at: https://youtu.be/uwWuTH9_khQ


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi Lucinda and all,

Recently, there was an article in the ARRL Letter about a proposal from the FCC to institute a fee for licenses and renewals. While I would hate to see a $50.00 fee to have my license, I certainly feel the hobby is worth it.

I do feel for sure, however, that there should be a fee for vanity call signs. If you want to pick your own call, then you can pay for it. Not that long ago there was a fee for vanity calls.

It should be pointed out that many years ago, there was a fee from the FCC
to get an amateur radio license. There was a fee for renewals too. That was dropped some time in the 70s, I think.

If I were the ARRL, here is how I would handle this. I would tell the FCC, if we pay your $50.00 fee, in return no more frequencies can be taken away from the amateur radio service. Further, if they do take more frequencies, then the fee must be lowered. Now, I know the FCC won’t go for such an idea, but it’s a good place to start.

I also feel you need to ask yourself what is the hobby worth to you. Maybe for some it isn’t worth the $50.00 every ten years. But I think for most of us, we can come up with the $50.00 to have our licenses. I should point out that it does cost the FCC money to process all of this stuff. I can also tell you that I have spent a lot more than $50.00 in the past few months just to keep my station on the air. I think we have a problem with too many people wanting everything for free.

I hope this letter finds everyone well and hope to hear you on the air.

Thanks and 73,

Matt KA0PQW


Interview of the Week

This week, we get to hear more from Austin, KA3TTT. Austin was one of the participants in our recent virtual Get on the Air class and has found ways to keep active in the hobby, even though he lives in an apartment. Please join us for the final part of his interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: So, I understand that you’re into Morse code. Why don’t you say a little about that.

AS: Yeah. As I said, when I was a kid, I had that Morse code chart, and the iambic keyer intrigued me. There was just something about it that always appealed to me. Now, being QRP, it’s especially appealing because you get more bang for your buck, so to speak. You get more miles per watt. I heard somewhere that a 5 watt CW signal is equivalent to a 100 watt SSB signal. But I’ve had more success on CW. I do pretty much all my work on HF on CW.

AS: And I’ve been having a lot of fun with a straight key, which came as a surprise to me. I thought I’d be doing all my work with an electronic key. But the SKCC, Straight Key Century Club, are very popular. I hear them a lot on the bands. And I thought, what is this SKCC thing. There must be something to it if I keep hearing all these people into it, so I got a straight key. And I’ve really been enjoying that also. I have both hooked up. A very nice ham made me a cable, so I can have a straight key and an electronic keyer hooked up to my KX3.

LM: Very nice.

AS: So, I can pick whatever I want. I’ve been really enjoying doing a lot of CW. I’m really glad I got back into it. When I got back into the hobby, I was around 15 words per minute, or so, and I was like, yes, I’m still over that hump. There’s that hump around 8 words per minute or so.

LM: Some people say around 10 to 12 words per minute.

AS: Yeah, 10 to 12 words per minute, that’s what it is. So, I was glad that I was still over that when I got back into the hobby. But, you know, I’ve just been doing a lot of listening and practicing, getting my CW back up. It’s a really fun mode, and I encourage people to get into it. It used to be required, and it’s not anymore. But it’s still a blast because you can very easily generate a signal and get on the air with CW. And when you’re low power, it’s the way to go.

LM: Yeah. It gives you a lot more options for what you can do if you’re able to do Morse code.

AS: There’s something relaxing about it. And I heard from somebody who did some research about it that it activates the same centers in the brain as learning a language.

LM: Yes.

AS: So, it has the same effect as learning another language. It’s stimulating, and it’s relaxing, and it’s fun. CW is great!

LM: Well, we sure enjoyed having you at the virtual Get on the Air event and loved your input in classes.

AS: Oh, thanks! Oh, that’s another thing. I use Linux, and that’s another thing that makes my station unique, so I tried to pitch in with some Linux solutions. Because Linux is free, the price is right. I feel like it’s this accessibility secret. It used to be a lot more arcane, but it’s not that hard to get into now. I would encourage people to check out Linux. If you’re coming from Windows, I would check out Ubuntu or something like that.

AS: If you have an old machine, Linux is a great option for resurrecting an old machine. If you have an old computer sitting around that can’t run the latest version of Windows, in other words, if it’s more than four years old, put Linux on it. Bring it back to life. Put it to use. I’m doing everything from Linux. I’m doing Logbook of the World, I’m doing QRZ, I’m doing all my logging. I’m doing all that in Linux.

LM: That just gives people more options.

AS: Yeah, exactly. It absolutely does. I think they go together really well. I wish we’d see more Linux support in ham radio. The two go together like peanut butter and jelly, I think. They both have that open source, DIY kind of spirit. I’d like to see more Linux support.

LM: Yeah.

AS: I think we will now that Raspberry Pi computers are becoming more popular.

LM: Yes. I think Raspberry Pi has been a good thing for the hobby.

AS: Yes, it has. That ClearNode is a Raspberry Pi device. Yeah, it’s very exciting to be back. And being into computers and having that experience, the Linux and programming experience, it’s really fun to be back in the hobby.

LM: Well, it was really nice talking to you today.

AS: Thanks, Lucinda.

LM: I appreciate you taking the time to do it. We’re just kind of wetting people’s appetite for future events.

AS: I’m so glad. I had hoped and assumed that you would continue doing these in the future, you know, no matter what the future holds. We’re seeing that trend in general, and that’s great. You know, do it all.

LM: Yes, because, when we can, we’re going to bring back in-person Radio Camp.

AS: You could even do some hybrid kind of things.

LM: And this gives us the opportunity to do things more often. You can only do so many in-person events. This gives us the opportunity to do more things more often and keep adding things.

AS: Yes. This was fantastic. I’m already looking forward to the next one.

LM: And one of the things we realized, and that’s going to be kicking off in September, is having the Handiham Radio Club get back to more regular activity by having them meet on Zoom.

AS: Oh. Yeah. I was a little confused about that. I think I’m a member of it, but I was little confused about all that.

LM: So, in order to get into the Handiham Radio Club, you have to be a member of the Handiham Program; but you’re not required to join the club if you join the Program.

AS: So, is that the special event? Is it the Radio Club that does the special events and stuff like that?

LM: Yes, that’s how it works. And what we’re working on is having the club do the Elmering for Handiham members, having the radio club take over more of that. With the new club email list, members will be able to get on and ask their own questions, basically freeing Pemdy and I up so we can plan more activities and yet still allow people to get the support and ham radio help they need that way.

AS: So, that frees you up to do more of the administrative stuff. That’s great! I would like to see some more special events, even though I didn’t get to work anyone. I was trying for a few hours! I didn’t get any takers, and of course, the Worked all Europe DX contest was going on, so I just got clobbered.

LM: Well, that happens.

AS: With QRP, that’s how it goes. When you’re going up against a 1500 watt contest station, forget it.

LM: Yeah, there isn’t a lot you can do there.

AS: But I hope we can do some more special events because I’d like to have some fun with the radio club with Elmering and special events. It sounds like something I’d be interested in for sure.

LM: And Elmering gives radio club members a way to give back and help other people. Well, thank you so much!

AS: And I’ll see you on the Handiham AllStar node.

LM: Yes, and when you do, write it up, and we’ll put it in the E-letter because I’m sure there are others who would be interested in doing it too. Sometimes people need to see that someone else has done it, and then they’ll get on and do it too. Well, have a good night.

AS: You too. 73.

LM: 73.

Stay tuned for a new interview airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

Attention Turns to Hurricane Sally after Hurricane Paulette Hits Bermuda

Photo of Hurricane Watch Net logo.

The Hurricane Watch Net (HWN) is staying busy monitoring multiple storms. While continuing to collect reports from Hurricane Paulette which made landfall on Monday in Bermuda, they are also gearing up for Hurricane Sally, expected to make landfall on Tuesday, impacting Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. The net is looking for weather data, storm surge, and damage reports. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/attention-turns-to-tropical-storm-sally-after-hurricane-paulette-hits-bermuda


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the new Extra Class pool this week to a question about phase angles.

E5C08 What coordinate system is often used to display the phase angle circuit containing resistance, inductive and/or capacitive reactance?

A. Maidenhead grid.
B. Faraday grid.
C. Elliptical coordinates.
D. Polar coordinates.

To show the impedance of a circuit with its phase angle, you would use polar coordinates, making answer D the correct choice. Polar coordinates offer a visual representation of the value of the impedance along with its phase angle.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.

The September issue of the QCWA Journal is now available in the magazines and newsletters section of the members only website.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for August 31, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of August 31, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham31AUG2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

The Handiham Radio Club is getting more radio-active! If you have not yet joined the club, please send an email to Pemdy to let her know you want in. The only membership requirement is that you are a current member of the Handiham Program. The next meeting will be tomorrow, Tuesday, September 1st, at 5:30pm Pacific, 6:30pm Mountain, 7:30pm Central, and 8:30pm Eastern, on Zoom. You can access the meeting via your telephone or computer. The meeting invite was sent yesterday via the new Handiham Radio Club email list and will be sent again on Tuesday afternoon.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session, likely in January of 2021. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Please keep watching for invitations to all the new lists. All you have to do to subscribe is hit reply and send. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are enjoying the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

The new Handiham Radio Club email list is the place where members can ask questions and share their experiences with amateur radio and assistive technology. We have so many talented and highly experienced members in the Handiham Radio Club, making this an invaluable resource for information.

We are offering new classes for Handiham Members, including a weekly Morse code class beginning on September 28th. Class sessions will use Zoom and will be available via the internet or telephone. Each session will also be recorded, so participants will have access to any sessions that cannot be attended live. If you are interested in attending, please ask Pemdy to send you an application.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 8) has more information about the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative, which is not just for college students. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. Due to the Labor Day holiday in the US on September 7th, there will be no issue of Handiham World next week. Additionally, I will be out of the office on vacation next week. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about the Ghotit Chrome extension, another article about the new proposed fees from the FCC, and the next part of a new interview with another of the participants from the recent virtual Get on the Air class. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

Ghotit Chrome Extension

Photo of Ghotit logo.

The Ghotit Chromebook App is a comprehensive literacy software, helping both children and adults with dyslexia and dysgraphia to read, write, and proofread their texts. Users of Google Docs can use the Ghotit Chromebook App to correct their spelling along with grammar and punctuation errors. The app offers many personalized settings to help with individualized solutions. To read more, check out the website at: https://www.ghotit.com/dyslexia-software-real-writer-for-chrome-extension


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi Everyone,

I want to extend a special invitation to all Handiham Program members and especially those who have never been to a Handiham Radio Club meeting. Please join us on Tuesday, September 1st, for the next meeting on Zoom.

73,

Linda Reeder, N7HVF
Handiham Radio Club President


Hi Everyone,

I thought some members would enjoy my article about my magnetic loop and dealing with Alpha Antenna.
https://austinseraphin.net/2020/08/24/my-alpha-antenna-adventure/

Thanks and 73,

Austin, KA3TTT


Interview of the Week

This week, we get to hear more from Austin, KA3TTT. Austin was one of the participants in our recent virtual Get on the Air class and has found ways to keep active in the hobby, even though he lives in an apartment. Please join us for the next part of his interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

AS: So, I’m really glad to be back in ham radio. Joining Handihams was one of the first things I did, actually, when I was getting back into it. Some clubs are super awesome, and some aren’t so great, and I thought, I’ve got to get back into the ones that are great. And Handihams was the one that really stood out to me, so I joined as a Lifetime Member right away. So, it’s been great to be back.

LM: Yes. Very nice.

AS: And having the virtual radio camp was fun.

LM: So, how was that? Tell me about your experience.

AS: I really enjoyed it. So, yeah, I mean, we’ve all been adapting to COVID-19 and all that, of course. Here in Philly, we’re pretty locked down, and a lot of us are just keeping to ourselves, at least I am. But ham radio’s been great. With ham radio, there’s this sense of connectivity about it, especially with sending out this radio wave. And my apartment, you know, is closed, the window is closed. It doesn’t open, but I can still get out with a radio wave, with a radio signal. And I hear people are starting to get a little more into ham radio now, so that’s good. People are thinking it’s a little cooler.

AS: So, I was happy to hear about the radio camp. I wasn’t surprised, unfortunately. I figured you guys would have to cancel radio camp. I figured you’d have to do the virtual thing. But for me, it worked out very well. I’m really glad. You know, having to deal with what I have to, it’s easier for me to stay at home. Traveling is a little more challenging.

LM: Yes.

AS: So, it was really nice to be able to stay here. I had a really terrible headache—I think it was Tuesday, the second day. And I didn’t really feel like doing anything, and if I would have been at radio camp, it would have been terrible. But, you know, I endured it, and I enjoyed it, and I still had fun that day. And I just kept on schedule and just kind of altered my schedule and went around it, and it was a great week.

AS: It was a really fun week. You know, we all dealt with Zoom as best we could and made the best of it. It wasn’t as spontaneous as maybe some would have liked.

LM: Right.

AS: But it was okay.

LM: With the virtual platform, you can’t let too much spontaneity happen, or it will be total chaos.

AS: That’s right. You need a lot more moderation with that. Yeah. That’s absolutely right. A few neat things happened to me. I think the neatest thing that happened was on Tuesday, my headache day, was the day of the basic net control class.

LM: Yes.

AS: There was a class on basic net control operations, and I enjoyed it. And the next day, Wednesday, is when HARC has their net. Unfortunately, one of them clashes with the Handiham net. I will have to find a way to multitask or something. Before that, at 7:15 Eastern, they have the Elmer net where we can check in and ask questions and talk about what we’re up to. And the previous week, the net control wasn’t there. I think he had another commitment or something. A few of us said we were monitoring, but things kind of fell apart because no one was in charge.

AS: And then that next week, on Wednesday, during radio camp, the same thing happened, and he wasn’t there. It turns out, he fell asleep. That’s all that was wrong. Of course, now days when that happens, we fear the worst. No, he fell asleep. It was a long day. So, he wasn’t there, and someone else said, I think there should be a net tonight because a few of us are here, and I think there should be a net. But I have other commitments, so someone else needs to lead the net, and I think that should be Austin, so KA3TTT, over to you. You’re net control for tonight.

AS: I said, oh, it’s a good thing I just took a class on basic net control operations at the virtual Handiham Get on the Air camp. So, really, it gave me confidence. I had been checking into that net for a while, but it gave me that extra boost of confidence that I could do it since I just took the basic class. I just did what they said, and it went well. It went fine, you know. So, I forgot to ask for check-ins the last time, and I didn’t ask for emergency and priority traffic right away. But I remembered, so everything got done. I know it for next time.

LM: And it all worked out anyway. It doesn’t have to be perfect.

AS: Exactly. It all worked out. I knew what I was supposed to do, ultimately, and everything worked out great. I really enjoyed it, actually. Radio camp already helped me, and the camp hadn’t even ended yet.

LM: That’s great!

AS: Yeah! I enjoyed Matt’s talk on weak signal propagation. I want to figure out how I can do that from my apartment. And he wants to help me with my magnetic loop also. We’re talking about an audible SWR meter of some sort.

LM: Yes.

AS: I believe he and a few others are working something out. I don’t know, but that’d be sweet if we could figure something out. And someone taught a class on the various digital modes, and I was really glad because that’s something that wasn’t really around as much when I was a kid. There was RTTY, and I think there was packet, and that was about it. But they were still kind of a niche. And now, they’ve just exploded.

AS: And my radio has D-Star, and I never really messed with it. But he was talking about the internet and modes and how there’s the analog ones and the digital modes. And he was talking about AllStar and Echolink, and he recommended a ClearNode. And I thought, I could get on AllStar. That’s pretty cool. It’s an analog mode. It seems a little closer to the spirit of things, so I contacted Jerry at Node-Ventures, and he emailed me right back and said he knew of at least six blind hams who were operating it. So, I got one set up here, and I just got it working. So, quite soon, I can get onto the Handiham AllStar node.

LM: Yeah. Let me know how that works, by the way.

AS: Yeah. I will. Apparently, now I’m on AllStar, so that was directly out of radio camp as well. So, good things have already come out of it.

LM: Yes. You should write something up that we can print in the E-Letter, because I think there would be other people interested in knowing.

AS: Oh, yeah, I will. My site is KA3TTT.net, by the way. And I publish articles there as well, and you guys are welcome to check it out, obviously. So, I’m glad to bring my writing into the ham radio world. I’ve been doing that for a few years.

LM: So, you’ve been able to bring a lot of things together.

AS: Exactly. Yeah, yeah. Ham radio’s been a big part of it. I’m glad to have it back in my life. And I think apartment ham operating would be a good future topic. It made me sad to hear people say they live in an apartment and can’t get on HF. That made me so sad. One guy got really bent out of shape about it. It’s like, you guys need to figure this out. Don’t give up. Don’t think you can’t do it. Get on the air.

LM: There are ways to make it happen.

AS: Yeah. Magnetic loops, dipoles, coax antennas. There are all kinds of things. So, just get on the air.

LM: Yep. You know, sometimes, you have to be flexible in what you’re willing to try, but that’s part of the fun of the hobby.

AS: Yeah. You have to accept your limits when you’re doing this. You’ll be QRP, and you’ll be dealing with a high noise floor, and all kinds of stuff, but that’s part of the hobby. And it makes even a simple contact exciting when you make it happen. It makes it that much more worth it, it really does. It’s really awesome.

Stay tuned for the next part of our interview with Austin airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

FCC Proposes to Reinstate Amateur Radio Service Fees

Photo of FCC logo.

The FCC would charge $50 for each amateur radio license application if the new proposed rules are adopted. The fee would apply to all applications for new licenses, renewals, upgrades, and vanity callsign requests. A change of address would incur no charge, but a request for a paper copy of a license would also include a $50 fee. The proposal is found in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in MD Docket 20-270. While deadlines for comments and reply comments have not yet been determined, this docket is already open for accepting comments. You can file your comments by using the FCC’s Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS) and posting to MD Docket No. 20-270. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/fcc-proposes-to-reinstate-amateur-radio-service-fees


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the General Class pool this week to a question about communications on the 17-meter and 12-meter bands.

G2A04 Which mode is most commonly used for voice communications on the 17-meter and 12-meter bands?

A. Upper sideband.
B. Lower sideband.
C. Vestigial sideband.
D. Double sideband.

Because 17 and 12 meters are higher in frequency than 20 meters, hams always use upper sideband, making answer A the correct choice. Back in the day, equipment limitations led to this tradition of using upper sideband for frequencies above 20 meters and lower sideband for frequencies below 20 meters. Even though modern equipment no longer requires this, the tradition continues.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for August 24, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of August 24, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham24AUG2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

The Handiham Radio Club is getting more radio-active! If you have not yet joined the club, please send an email to Pemdy to let her know you want in. The only membership requirement is that you are a current member of the Handiham Program. The next meeting will be on Tuesday, September 1st, at 5:30pm Pacific, 6:30pm Mountain, 7:30pm Central, and 8:30pm Eastern, on Zoom. You can access the meeting via your telephone or computer. The meeting invite will be sent via the new Handiham Radio Club email list.

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session, likely in January of 2021. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Please keep watching for invitations to the new lists. All you have to do to subscribe is hit reply and send. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are looking forward to the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

As we adjust to the changing times, we are offering new classes for Handiham Members, including a weekly Morse code class beginning on September 28th. Class sessions will use Zoom and will be available via the internet or telephone. Each session will also be recorded, so participants will have access to any sessions that cannot be attended live. If you are interested in attending, please ask Pemdy to send you an application.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 8) has more information about the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative, which is not just for college students. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. Due to the class next week, however, I will be unavailable for routine requests. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about the new OrCam MyEye Pro, another article about the Hurricane Watch Net activation, and a new interview with another of the participants from the recent virtual Get on the Air class. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

OrCam MyEye Pro

Photo of OrCam MyEye Pro, an assistive technology device that attaches to glasses for people who are blind or low vision.

The new OrCam MyEye Pro is a revolutionary voice activated device that attaches to virtually any glasses. It can instantly read text from a book, smartphone screen, or any other surface, recognize faces, help you shop on your own, work more efficiently, and live a more independent life. Features include color and object identification, barcode scanning, facial recognition, smart reading, orientation, and a new companion app. The OrCam MyEye Pro conveys visual information audibly, in real-time and offline. To read more, check out the website at: https://www.orcam.com/en/myeye2/

To watch a video review about the OrCam MyEye Pro from Sam at The Blind Life, go to: https://youtu.be/tqAN6hlnn4I


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi Everyone,

I think this new Handiham Radio Club email list is a fantastic idea. This is a place where we can post new ideas. If we have questions about a problem with ham radio equipment or questions about Echolink, we can ask them there. Maybe there is some new equipment you would like to tell everyone about. This is the place to do that.

I really enjoy the radio club, and I think adding this will be really helpful for all Handiham members. Also, it is a great way to keep in touch with one another. I am looking forward to getting more involved with it.

I also want to extend a special invitation to those who have never been to a Handiham Radio Club meeting. Please join us next Tuesday, September 1st, for the next meeting.

73,

Linda Reeder, N7HVF
Handiham Radio Club President


Interview of the Week

This week, we get to hear from Austin, KA3TTT. Austin was one of the participants in our recent virtual Get on the Air class and has found ways to keep active in the hobby, even though he lives in an apartment. Please join us for the first part of his interview.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: Hi Austin, how are you?

AS: All right.

LM: So, how did you originally get into ham radio?

AS: It started—honestly, one of my earliest memories is playing with a radio. I remember, I must have been around one year old or so. I remember hitting it, and it made this squealing sound. And it had buttons and knobs, and it really intrigued me. I remember being worried about getting in trouble, but I also thought it was really cool. So, I started playing with radios when I was young. And I was around them a lot when I was a kid.

LM: Yes.

AS: Then I remember my parents took me to the Franklin Institute here in Philadelphia. I would have been seven or eight years old. The Franklin Institute Science Museum here in Philly is a famous one, and at the time, they had a ham radio room. Unfortunately, they don’t now. I wish they could bring it back. But at the time, they did, and this would have been in the mid-80s.

AS: So, we went to the ham radio room, and that was just it. I was just hooked. I remember turning the big knobs, the VFO. I remember the iambic code keyer that just fascinated me. I remember on the trip home asking my Mom and Dad to please get me a ham radio. That’s what I want. Please get me a ham radio. And they said okay, you have to take your test and get a license. And I said, okay, that’s fine. You know, when you’re a kid, you’re always having to take tests, so you know, whatever.

AS: So, when I was ten, I started studying. Oh, my Granddad, who is no longer with us, flew sea planes in World War II in the Navy. And he made a Morse code chart, and my Mom—she was always doing these kinds of things for me—she made it on poster board with Elmer’s glue, so I could feel it. And I put it up over my bed, and that’s how I would go to sleep at night, I would just read the Morse code chart. That’s how I would go to sleep at night when I was a little kid.

LM: That’s great!

AS: Yeah! So, I started really studying when I was ten. I remember they had these tapes called Tune in the World. I don’t know if you remember that.

LM: Oh, yeah.

AS: Yeah, you remember them. I think they might have been through ARRL.

LM: Yep.

AS: I was a kid. I don’t know. I just know I ended up with them somehow. But I loved those, and I listened to those constantly. And I took my test when I was twelve, my Novice. And I passed my Novice. Then, I discovered Handiham at some point. I think someone else in the radio club that I was a member of may have also been a member. I guess that’s how it worked, looking back now. It must have been, because we went to one of the radio camps together. I went to the first radio camp—I went to one in California. And my family was going on vacation also, so we all made it work. But I didn’t pass. I was going for Tech, but I failed my Tech the first time.

AS: It’s funny, the clearest memory I have of the California, I guess it was the Malibu radio camp, was at some point they were having a meeting where they were discussing some more administrative stuff. And they were saying, we need to figure out why more Californians aren’t coming to California Radio Camp. And an older woman piped up, because we don’t listen to the part that says sunny. That’s my clearest memory, that and failing the Tech exam. But that’s how it goes. And I roomed with my buddy, Tom, N4TMD, and I’m getting him back into the hobby, so that’s good.

AS: Then, in Minnesota, I went back to another radio camp. I think we landed in Bemidji? I remember taking this harrowing plane flight, and it scared me so much. I was a little kid, and that plane flight kind of scared me. And it was cold too, like you guys get real cold there.

LM: Yeah, we do.

AS: So, there was that going on, so there was no fun in the sun. Although we did have fun. I remember we went to the Mississippi River, and we took that boat around. But it was down to business, and I passed my Tech and my General and my Extra Class code.

LM: Wow!

AS: So, I made up for chillin’ in California in Minnesota. And it was a great time, so I have good memories of Radio Camp when I went as a kid. And then I got out of the hobby when I went off to college. Some people were kind of mean to me locally, and that can happen, unfortunately, when you’re a kid.

LM: Yeah.

AS: So, I went off to college, and stuff happens. So, I got out of the hobby, and I wish I wouldn’t have, but that’s how life goes. And I think a lot of hams seem to follow this trajectory. I’ve been hearing that. And they get back into it later in life.

LM: Yep.

AS: And for me, what happened was that I started getting headaches and severe eye pain and having to deal with chronic pain and going on this whole healing journey and really getting back to my life purpose and figuring out exactly what that was and rebuilding myself because I crashed. And I realized at some point while going through this whole journey, I had to get my hobby back. And I realized that was one of the things that I had lost, and that was one of the reasons that I had burned out, because I didn’t have a hobby. I just kept working and burned out. I said, I’ve got to get my hobby back. I’ve got to get back into ham radio.

AS: But now the challenges. At the time, of course, I lived in the suburbs, so I could put an antenna up in trees and such. I had a doublet up in beautiful trees. I lived in Swarthmore, which won one of the TreeTown USA awards. They’re very proud of their trees in Swarthmore, and rightly so. And here I live in an apartment now because I wasn’t even thinking of ham radio. I probably wouldn’t have picked this place if I was because they don’t allow outdoor antennas. But I already lived here, so that’s how it went.

AS: So, I was like, whatever, I’m getting back on the air. So, I got a Kenwood TH-D74a. That’s a good talking HT for the blind. I got a better antenna. I got a J-pole, and I started checking into a local net. And I started listening a lot more. I noticed as an adult that I listen a lot more. So, I started checking into a net, and I joined a local club, the Holmesburg Amateur Radio Club, who are really awesome, great club. They do the WM3PEN event every year with the 13 Colonies. You might know them from that.

LM: Yep. I’ve worked it before.

AS: Yeah. Good. That’s them. I would have been on the other end, but we’ll get to that. Anyways, so I joined them, and I realized I wanted to get back on HF, really, because I just had so much fun on HF as a kid. There’s something about the sounds, on VHF and UHF too, but there’s something about the sounds, especially HF. I don’t know—there’s something about the sounds, the atmosphere, radio. There’s something about it that’s just always soothed me.

AS: So, I did a lot of research, and I put together a station. I have an Elecraft KX3, a wonderful QRP radio, and I have an Alpha Loop, a magnetic loop antenna, and that’s my main HF antenna. I’ve got a few loaded whips. I can also go up to the roof deck of my building, so sometimes I can go up there. So, I’m back on 80 through 10 meters, 2 and 440. I still have to get 6. Once I get 6, I’ll be all bands, so I’m really happy. I just got back on 80 meters, which I’m super happy about. Yeah, I’m back, and I super happy about it, even from my apartment and even with all the challenges and the high noise and all the issues and the RFI and all that. It’s all worth it. It’s part of the challenge. No matter where you are, you’ll have challenges.

LM: It’s part of the fun of being a ham, the fact that you can do more than just plug and play.

AS: No. You’re right, and one of the hams from my local club said that too. He said, if it were easy, it wouldn’t be fun. I said, you know, you’re absolutely right about that. Oh, and let’s not forget the low solar conditions as well.

LM: Yeah, this cycle has left a lot to be desired.

AS: Yeah, this is when I’m getting into it. But I thought it was cool. I’m glad I’m getting into it at the worst possible time. It’s like buying a house in the rain. If I build my station now, I know what it’s capable of.

LM: That’s it!

Stay tuned for the next part of our interview with Austin airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

Hurricane Watch Net Activated for Marco and Laura

Photo of HWN logo.

The Hurricane Watch Net (HWN) activated for Hurricane Marco on Sunday. Marco is forecast to make landfall on Monday afternoon. According to Bobby Graves, KB5HAV, HWN Manager, this activation will line up reporting stations for both Marco and Laura, which is expected to impact this same region later in the week. According to Jim Coleman, AI5B, Louisiana Section Emergency Coordinator, Louisiana ARES is on alert status in preparation for the storms. Additionally, emergency communications kits from ARRL Headquarters have been staged in Louisiana to be ready for use. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/hurricane-watch-net-to-activate-as-louisiana-braces-for-marco-and-laura


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the Technician Class pool this week to a question about meteor scatter.

T3C07 What band is best suited for communicating via meteor scatter?

A. 10 meter band.
B. 6 meter band.
C. 2 meter band.
D. 70 centimeter band.

For ham radio operators, meteor showers are more than just a pretty sight. Radio waves can be bounced off a meteor trail leading to some interesting contacts. The best band for working meteor scatter is 6 meters, making answer B the correct choice. Of course, it’s a good idea to pay attention to when meteor showers are expected to know when to look for this weak signal propagation.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for August 17, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of August 17, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham17AUG2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

Thanks to the success of the 2020 Virtual Get on the Air class, we are already working on plans for the next Get on the Air session, likely in January of 2021. If you want to be placed on the list to receive an application, please contact Pemdy.

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list along with Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists are moving to Groups.io. Please keep watching for invitations to the new lists. All you have to do to subscribe is hit reply and send. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new lists. Please note, while Handiham World is available to everyone, only current members of the Handiham Program are eligible to join Handiham Notify and the Handiham Radio Club lists. We are looking forward to the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

As we adjust to the changing times, we are offering new classes for Handiham Members, including a weekly Morse code class to begin on September 28th. Class sessions will use Zoom and will be available via the internet or telephone. Sessions will also be recorded, so participants will have access to any sessions that cannot be attended live. If you are interested in participating, please ask Pemdy to send you an application.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 8) has more information about the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative, which is not just for college students. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. Due to the class next week, however, I will be unavailable for routine requests. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about the new OrCam Read, another article about a new IARU working group to address HF digital mode congestion, and a new interview with one of the participants from last week’s virtual Get on the Air class. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

OrCam Read

Photo of OrCam Read, an assistive technology device for people who are blind or low vision or have a reading impairment.

The new OrCam Read helps people who are blind or visually impaired to read printed material. This device also works for anyone who has a reading impairment including dyslexia. The OrCam Read has physical, tactile buttons, improving accessibility. It also has two modes, a full-page scanning mode and a section mode. In the section mode, it will read only the part that the device is pointed at rather than the entire page. The smart reading setting helps you find specific information rather than having to read an entire page to find what you are looking for. To read more, check out the website at: https://www.orcam.com/en/read/

To watch a video review about the OrCam Read, go to: https://youtu.be/q9zCNwA4xbc


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Hi Lucinda,

That dip in the pool question made me think that there are a good number of hams who have never adjusted a squelch knob. I don’t think you use that on a DMR or other digital radio, and there is no such knob on a Baofeng or similar FM handheld. You can press a side button to open the receiver, and there is a software setting to determine how tight the squelch is set.

I discovered the “CQ Ham Radio” podcast. They also put the podcasts on YouTube, so you can search for CQ Blind Hams as well.

After many tries, I got a registered DMR code from http://radioid.net. Some pitfalls include setting a complicated password and having the password field change to green. I had to borrow my wife’s eyes for that. Then I had to upload a copy of my license to the site. Once that was accomplished, I got the code in under an hour.

73 for now,

Mark Senk, WB3CAI


Interview of the Week

Lifetime Handiham Program member, Johnny Ott, WA8WFH, joined me for an interview over the weekend to talk about his experience at the recent Get on the Air class. Please join me for the conversation.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: So, today we’ve got Johnny Ott. He was one of the attendees for the recent Get on the Air class that we had. And welcome, Johnny! Why don’t you start out with a little bit of your impressions about the class.

JO: Well, it’s a completely different experience, and I had to do it—I don’t know about the rest—but I probably the only one that I’m aware of that had to do it completely on the phone because my computer is not acting like it should. That was completely different as well. I enjoyed it, though. Now, of course, you got to remember that me being in an assisted living place, there was always interruptions between physical therapies and taking temperatures and oxygen and blood pressure and who knows what all.

JO: So, a lot of it, I had to be in and out, I guess you would say. I had everything left on, but I was in and out. So, I don’t know if anybody was looking for me any time that I wasn’t around, but overall, I thoroughly enjoyed it. I hated to see it come to an end. I can’t wait for the next class to take place, which I guess will be another phone session as far as I know, the way things are going now. But I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was just wonderful.

LM: Well, I’m really glad you enjoyed it, Johnny, and yeah, for the time being right now, we are going to have to do Zoom sessions until we can safely do in-person stuff again. And I really think we are going to just continue doing Zoom stuff anyway, even when we can do in-person stuff again. So, you’ll just have more stuff you can attend.

JO: Yeah, we just Zoomed right in and out, didn’t we!

LM: Oh, Johnny!

JO: Ah, that’s one thing I missed that you get to do at camp, like I said at the end of the last session. See, at camp we get to do one-liners and quotas, stuff like that. Here, it was a little bit more subdued, but it was all right.

LM: Yeah, we did have to keep things a bit more subdued just because you have so many different people, and with getting people’s mics open and muted and that kind of stuff, it does limit some of the free-form activity that takes place at camp.

JO: That’s true. And I like the way you broke up each session. You had 45 minutes with a 15-minute break. Then you had another 45, with a two-hour break for lunch. Then another 45 session with a 15-minute break, and then the last one would be another 45-minute session. And on that last session on the last day, there was not a dry plastic eye in the place. Everybody hated to see it end.

LM: Yep. We had some really delightful comments that people shared on that last day talking about how much fun they had throughout the week. I know the instructors really enjoyed it too, so it was kind of a good time had by all. But, Johnny, you have a unique perspective because you’ve attended a lot of radio camps over the years, and now you’ve attended our first Zoom event. So, what do you think, and how do the events compare?

JO: Oh, that’s a good question. Well, with camp, you had a lot of preparation, and then you had to worry about being dedicated unto being medicated—you had to make sure you had all your stuff with you, make sure you had all your pills and stuff just in case. And then, of course, you had a lot of the other activities as well. You had the entertainment and the bon fires and the s’mores, and you thoroughly enjoyed it. Of course, you sometimes wondered if you were in a bug-infested jungle or something, but you had a chance to learn how to play with different pieces of equipment.

JO: And, in my case, and I know with some other people as well, you got to do things for one solid week that you knew you wouldn’t be able to do until the next year. And for some people, that was their, not only their event of the week, but their event of the year—something you could really look forward to. There was more action, more things going on. And, of course, you had your class sessions, and then you had test day, and you got to be involved with that, especially if you were a VE. It was one kind of experience, and I think you had more people attending camp if you included everybody than you would with this online or on-the-phone adventure. And you got to learn, and you picked up new skills. You learned new things.

JO: With the Zoom sessions, they were okay, but they were completely different. There was a lot of things that you missed by not being at camp. And then some people had to worry about time differences. Now, for people like you and I, it was no problem because we’re all in the same time zone. And the part that I really liked was when you and especially your fellow Michigan instructor started to talk about stuff. And when you mentioned different places and things, I followed you exactly. I knew exactly what you all were talking about, and boy does that bring back memories.

JO: So, I think it’s like apples and oranges, two different ways of doing things, two different experiences. And then, of course, you begin to wonder if we’re going to return to camping next year or whether we will be confined to doing it the way we did it this time and the way we’ll do it for the next class. If you were to ask me, which did you like better, that’s a hard question to ask because you’re talking about two completely different worlds or universes. You really—it’s hard to compare the two because they are all different things.

LM: That makes sense.

JO: So, that’s about the best I can do.

LM: That makes a lot of sense, and from listening to you talk just now, I get the feeling that you like both of them, and you’d like to do both.

JO: I did like them both, yes. I liked each and every one of them. That’s all right.

LM: Well, we sure enjoyed having you join us last week, and you asked some good questions in the classes and were able to participate. And even though you were only able to connect via phone because of computer issues, you were quickly able to master the skill of raising your hand virtually and navigate all of that, so I thought it worked really well.

JO: Yep, that’s very true. And I liked the way we tried to do a virtual net. That was very interesting as well.

LM: Yes.

JO: The other thing, though, at the camp, we could devote—like we did one day to emergency and public service. And we actually simulated an emergency. We weren’t really able to do that while Zooming away, like we would at camp, but I still enjoyed it. I enjoyed both, and I’m looking forward to the next session. That’s going to be very interesting too, how we’re going to do that one, and especially how I’m going to be able to do it, because I do want to maintain my code speed, and I’d like to, although I guess I don’t really need it—it’s a skill that you acquired over the years, and you do want to hang onto it.

LM: Oh, yeah.

JO: Because you never know when you might need it, even though it’s no longer a legal requirement.

LM: Yep.

JO: You do it because you want to and you enjoy it and you want to be able to improve it and never let it go.

LM: Most definitely. Well, thank you so much for taking the time, Johnny, to do this little interview and let us know about your experience. Again, it has some special meaning because you’ve been to lots of radio camps and now this event.

JO: And I’ve enjoyed both, and I want to continue. And that, by the way, is why I am a life member. It’s a great investment!

LM: That’s right, Johnny. Well, thank you so much for doing this, and I hope you have a great week this week.

Stay tuned for a new interview airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

IARU Announces HF Digital Mode Band Plan Review

Photo of IARU logo.

To reduce congestion from increasingly popular HF digital modes, an International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) working group has been formed to create solutions that prevent interference from incompatible modes as much as possible. In this history-making effort, representatives of all three regional band-planning committees are working together to accomplish this goal. This is the first time all IARU regions have directly joined in coordinating band planning. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/iaru-announces-hf-digital-mode-band-plan-review


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the Extra Class pool this week to a question about inductors.

E6D11 Which type of core material decreases inductance when inserted into a coil?

A. Ceramic.
B. Brass.
C. Ferrite.
D. Powdered Iron.

You won’t likely find brass slugs in your ham gear, but high-powered transmitters do often use moveable brass slugs in their tuning networks. This is because brass has a negative permeability and works to reduce the inductance of an inductor, making answer B the correct choice.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


Handiham World for August 10, 2020

Handiham Program
 

Logo for Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, part of Allina Health

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute Handiham World Weekly E-Letter for the week of August 10, 2020

This is a free weekly news & information update from the Courage Kenny Handiham Program, serving people with disabilities in Amateur Radio since 1967.

Our contact information is at the end.

Listen here:
https://handiham.org/audio/handiham10AUG2020.mp3


Get this podcast in iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/handiham-world/id1457854439?mt=2&app=podcast

RSS feed for the audio podcast if you use other podcasting software:
https://handiham.org/wordpress1/feed/podcast/

Subscribe or change your subscription to the E-mail version here.


Welcome to Handiham World.

In this edition:

  • A note from the coordinator
  • News in Assistive Technology
  • From the Mailbag
  • Interview of the Week
  • Ham Radio in the News
  • A Dip in the Pool
  • Website Update
  • Equipment Connection
  • Help Needed
  • Check into our nets!
  • …And more!

A note from the coordinator…

We had a great time last week at the first Handiham Virtual Get on the Air class! I was impressed with how both participants and instructors were able to quickly adapt to the virtual platform and keep the classes very interactive. The instructors provided interesting and informative content, and the participants contributed their experiences and asked questions to further their knowledge. We are already talking about when we will hold the next virtual Get on the Air class, so stay tuned!

Screenshot from 2020 Virtual GOTA Class with N3FJP logging software in use and photos and names from Zoom attendees.

The Handiham World E-letter list is moving from Freelists to Groups.io. Over the next week, you will get an invitation to the new list. All you have to do to subscribe is hit reply and send. You don’t have to type anything additional in the email to be subscribed to the new list. We are looking forward to the improved accessibility with Groups.io.

As we adjust to the changing times, we are offering new classes for Handiham Members, including a weekly Morse code class to begin in the fall of 2020. Class sessions will use Zoom and will be available via the internet or telephone. Sessions will also be recorded, so participants will have access to any sessions that cannot be attended live. If you are interested in participating, please ask Pemdy to place you on the list.

Photo of green road sign with the word change printed on it.

Due to the spread of COVID-19, we are not working from the office right now. We are still able to check our phone messages and return phone calls, and mail will be picked up as often as possible. Of course, the best way to get in touch with us during this time is via email.

Photo of 2 meter wavelength as guide to social distancing.

Along with the release of the new On the Air magazine, the magazine for beginner-to-intermediate ham radio operators, the ARRL is also doing a monthly podcast to take a deeper look at some of the topics and projects included in the magazine. The latest episode of the On the Air podcast (Episode 7) focuses on how to properly solder a PL259 connector along with a discussion of courses that will help improve your public service skills. You can check it out at http://www.arrl.org/on-the-air-podcast.

If you are having trouble receiving your E-Letter, you can always go to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/weekly-e-letter/ to see the latest E-Letter. Additionally, you can go to https://handiham.org/audio/handiham.mp3 to listen to the current podcast. These links are updated each time a new E-Letter and podcast is released.

Pemdy and I will be working during our usual hours this week. Due to the class next week, however, I will be unavailable for routine requests. If you call the Handiham Program office, please leave a message, and we will return your call as soon as we are available. When you leave that message, don’t forget to leave your name, phone number, call sign, if you have one, and the reason for your call. Also, if you send an email, please include your name along with your call sign, and the reason for your email to speed up the response time. As always, if you need to update anything like your contact information, call sign, license class, membership, or members only log-in information, you can email us at handiham@....

In the E-Letter, there is an article about the new eSight 4, another article about a ham making history traveling to the ISS, and a new interview with two of the instructors from last week’s virtual Get on the Air class. Of course, you can also find the regular articles you see here each week.

Do you have a story to share about assistive technology or ham radio related activities? Please send your articles and stories via email to Lucinda.Moody@... or by calling me at 612-775-2290.


News in Assistive Technology

eSight 4

Photo of eSight 4, a wearable assistive technology device for people with low vision.

The eSight 4 is a wearable assistive technology device for individuals with low vision. It offers many features such as digital video magnification, color filters for reading, customizable scenes, and the ability to view streaming media. You can pair this device to the companion app to extend its functionality even further. To read more, check out the website at: https://esighteyewear.com

To watch a video review about the eSight 4, go to: https://youtu.be/SAhGsqyANz4


From the Mailbag

Photo of mail carrier with mail bag and letter.

Dear Pemdy and Lucinda,

Nice Handiham letter. I liked Matt’s comments too. I have been busy sorting out my junk boxes and trying to keep the old-time radios working. I am also busy on the air with COVID-19 on the MARCO Net on Sunday mornings with grand rounds—when we do not have thunderstorms, that is. Thanks for the great newsletter and keep healthy,

Doctor Dave, KN0S


Hello,

I’m writing to let you know about Aira as a free service. After you download the app, the first five minutes are free. If you need additional help, you can call back and get the same agent to finish your task. This is a great service. I just wanted to pass this on. To get the app, go to the App Store for IOS or the Google Play store for Android and search for “Aira.”

Thanks and 73,

Dan Marshall, KG5WBO


Interview of the Week

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of interviewing John Glass, NU6P, and Tom Behler, KB8TYJ, two of our instructors for the virtual Get on the Air class last week. Please join us for our conversation.

Photo of arm in suit jacket with hand holding a large communications microphone.

LM: I wanted to record something today for Handiham World, and I figured you two would be good ones for that just to give people a little idea of what went on last week. And it’s kind of cool, because that was the first virtual event for the Handiham Program. So, you guys got to be a part of history!

TB: Absolutely!

JG: That’s great!

LM: I just figured we could go around and talk a little bit about what you noticed and what you liked. You were both instructors, and we’ve already gotten a lot of feedback from participants that they really enjoyed it. Why don’t we start out with Tom. You taught several classes over the first two days and the last day. Let’s hear your impressions of what happened last week.

TB: Okay. I taught the basic introductory sessions the first day, sort of on basic radio operations, just kind of going over some rules of the road, sort of reviewing basic procedures, and even sharing some funny stories about things like VOX, for example, and why you have to be careful with VOX. And I was really pleased because one of the things I was worried about during that session and all of the sessions was, would we be able to get as much participation from the class members as we wanted, and we did. I really think we did. I was pleasantly surprised.

TB: So, I taught the basic radio operations parts, and then I taught the net control sessions. We even simulated a net using Zoom. We had to change things around a little bit, but we managed to do it. Again, it wasn’t quite as nice as the real thing where you’re actually checking into a real net like we did last year with the Handiham net or the PICOnet, but still, I think it gave people an idea of how all that works.

TB: And then I did a little section on emergency communication, and then Friday, in the last sessions, I did an overview with logging. And again, I was really, really worried about that because I didn’t know how we could get the N3FJP logging software to play with Zoom. But it sort of did. I had to jury-rig things here and there, and I know it wasn’t probably very elegant, but at least it worked, and people got an idea of logging and the various logging possibilities, and how something like the N3FJP software works, and what you can do with it.

TB: So, overall, I think it was an absolutely excellent week. I really do, and I’m saying that honestly. And I think especially, since you consider that it was the first time we did anything like that. And we’ve all learned things, and now for the next time around, we’ll put those lessons into effect and make it even better.

LM: That’s the nice thing about looking back on what you do, and you can find out what went well, what do we want to continue, what do we want to improve. But I really thought the participants did a great job with the first event for the Program on Zoom, and they quickly got the hang of raising their hands and being able to participate in the sessions. And that’s one of the things I really liked about this platform is that it was truly interactive. People weren’t just listening, they were participating.

TB: Yep, yep.

LM: John, why don’t you share a bit about what you taught this last week?

JG: Well, I headed up two sessions this last week. The first one was on UHF and VHF simplex and repeaters, and that one was kind of fun for me because I went back and wrote up some notes of my memories when I first got on 2-meters back in 1975 after getting my General Class license. And I told people a little bit about the history of repeaters and how they were originally put together from surplus commercial equipment. Also, I mentioned to people that most operators back then were crystal-controlled, which meant that they had a limited number of channels in their radios.

JG: And then we moved on a little bit to more modern radios. We talked about what is necessary information to have in order to get your radio programmed up to operate on a local repeater. We discussed resources for finding local repeaters and had some really nice questions as a result of that presentation.

JG: The second one that I was involved with was digital communications modes for VHF and UHF that you can operate with a handheld or mobile radio. And we talked about Echolink, IRLP, and Allstar. Those are modes, of course, that can be used with your standard analog radio.

JG: And then we moved into some of the modes which require a digital radio, such as DMR. We talked about D-Star, and John Farina, W2QCY, gave a nice demonstration of that mode. We mentioned Yaesu System Fusion and APCO-25 and got some really nice questions about those modes. And people seemed to enjoy the presentation. I actually got some comments afterwards from people who would like us to delve a little deeper into some of those modes in future presentations. People had some questions about how you get your radio programmed up on the local repeater and select the local talkgroups and conference rooms to communicate through and that sort of thing. So, I’m hoping that in the future, we’ll have more time to spend on these modes.

JG: And you know, I just have to honestly say that it was a wonderful experience for me being an instructor because not only was I able to talk about some things that I know a little bit about, but I also learned a lot too. And some things that I learned about were the digital mode, FT-8. I really enjoyed the presentations on logging. Matt Arthur’s presentation on weak signal work on VHF and UHF gave me some tips on things that I want to try in the future.

JG: And I think it was really just a nice opportunity to get to know the other instructors and many of the participants a little better. And so I really had an enjoyable time, and like Tom said, it was a great week, and I’m really looking forward to the next time that we’re able to put something like this on because I always come away feeling like I have learned a lot and met some really nice people whenever I’ve attended a Handiham event. I’m very excited about continuing this and really look forward to the next time that we’re able to get together.

LM: Thanks, John. This is actually your third event that you’ve done since the Handiham Program got back going in 2017. You’ve been at all three of them, and Tom’s been at two of the three, so you’ve gotten to see how the Program is progressing. And, of course, we didn’t think this was the direction that the Program was going in this year, but with circumstances the way they are in 2020, our hand was forced in a different direction. But I think in the end, this is actually going to be good for the program because this is a way we can reach even more people. Yes, we’re still going to bring back in-person events when it is safe to do so, but this gives us a way to reach people that can’t come to the in-person events and be able to have them participate and learn and grow and be able to develop their skills in the amateur radio hobby.

LM: And the next thing, coming up just around the corner, we are getting a Morse code class going this fall. And then, after this event went so well, we’re going to be planning the next virtual Get on the Air class, so there’s lots of good stuff to come.

JG: And a big thank you to you, Lucinda, for pulling it all together. You did a great job.

TB: I want to echo that too. You really did, Lucinda, and I think other people have recognized that. And I look back at the schedule, and I look back at what John said, and what I said in the beginning—we have in Handihams an incredible number and variety of very talented people that represent, and I think it’s going to be even more true in the future, a cross section of amateur radio and all the various aspects of it.

TB: I know I have a few suggestions for future sessions, and I think you said there’s going to be a survey coming out where I can put it down in writing, but we have an incredible group of people here. And it’s just absolutely amazing to see it all come together virtually, which was no small feat, really. And I think, Lucinda, you headed it all up, so you’re definitely to be commended.

LM: Well, thanks, Tom and John. You know, it’s interesting the amount of talent that is in the Handiham Program. You realize that all but one of the instructors are also members of the Program. So, we aren’t bringing in outside people to teach this, we’re doing it from within, and I think that’s pretty amazing.

JG: Yeah, that really is nice. And, like Tom, I have a number of ideas for future sessions that I’ve been compiling, and I’ve actually been writing them down, so I won’t forget them. And some of these suggestions were made during the question and answer sessions that we had this last week. And also, a couple of them are ideas that I’ve come up with. I think there’s going to be no shortage of material. There are plenty of topics that we can cover for amateur radio that will keep us going well out into the future.

LM: Oh, definitely. I think this expansion of the Handiham Program is going to be a good thing for everybody involved where people can learn and grow. And what I’m interested to see, is next time we have an in-person event, I’m interested to see how this impacts that, because I think if people come in with more knowledge and more training ahead of time and more experience, it’s just going to make the in-person events even more special because it gives us a chance to really focus on the hands-on activities because we’ve done all the other stuff ahead of time, virtually.

TB: Yep, absolutely.

LM: I really appreciate you guys teaching this last week and all the work you put into this and the help and support because running a Program with two people—we couldn’t do a whole lot if it wasn’t for all the volunteers, so it means a lot.

JG: Thanks for having us.

TB: Thank you.

Stay tuned for a new interview airing next week.


Ham Radio in the News

Radio Amateur Takes Part in Historic First Commercial Human Spaceflight to ISS

Photo of NASA logo superimposed on photos of space.

Over the years, amateur radio has played a significant role in space flight, and this latest mission was no exception. Bob, KE5GGX, was one of two NASA astronauts who made history when they were part of the first commercial human flight into space. This was the first spaceflight to carry humans from the US in nearly ten years, following the retirement of the space shuttle program. To learn more, go to: http://www.arrl.org/news/radio-amateur-takes-part-in-historic-first-commercial-human-spaceflight-to-iss


A Dip in the Pool
drawing of person studying

It’s time to test our knowledge by taking a dip in the question pool…

Let’s go to the General Class pool this week to a question about capacitors.

G6A13 Why is the polarity of applied voltages important for polarized capacitors?

A. Incorrect polarity can cause the capacitor to short-circuit.
B. Reverse voltages can destroy the dielectric layer of an electrolytic capacitor.
C. The capacitor could overheat and explode.
D. All these choices are correct.

Because most electrolytic capacitors are polarized, they need to be wired up properly. You don’t want to experience an exploding capacitor! All of these answers are right, making answer D the correct choice. This is a good reminder to make sure you double check the polarity every time you install a capacitor in a circuit.


Website Update

Photo of the words website update with construction equipment working on the letters.

Here are the latest updates on the new Handiham.org website. Don’t forget to monitor the site for updates throughout the week. When changes are made, I will post to the website. You can also find the latest updates any time by going to https://handiham.org/wordpress1/website-updates/. If you have any feedback about the website, I would love to hear from you. If you are a current member and your credentials are not allowing you to login to the site, please contact Pemdy for assistance at handiham@... or 612-775-2291.

The August issue of the QCWA Journal is now available in the magazines and newsletters section of the members only website.


Equipment Connection

Photo of Icom IC-7200 with LDG auto-tuner and power supply.

Equipment connections are happening, and the list is open! If you have a request for the Equipment Connection, contact me, leaving your name and phone number. I will call you to discuss your request. Please note that it may take several days for a return call due to all the other things going on in the Handiham Program. If you don’t hear back from me after two weeks, you may contact me a second time. Additionally, if you have received any equipment from the Handiham Program during the last 12 months, you will automatically be placed at the bottom of the list so that others can also participate in the Equipment Connection.

Many thanks to the numerous people who have offered equipment for Handiham Members. If you have equipment that you would like to donate to a Handiham Program member, please email Lucinda at Lucinda.Moody@... or call 1-612-775-2290.


Help Needed

Photo of note with the words help needed written on it.

The Handiham Program needs contributors to Handiham World. Do you have a particular interest in amateur radio that you would like to share with others? Maybe you have a particular mode or band you like to operate and have learned a lot about. Or maybe you have some great stories to share from your experiences in the amateur radio hobby. Put your writing skills to work for Handiham World by sending your submissions to Lucinda.Moody@....

We are always looking for more readers, including some with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. We also need some readers with a background in teaching in STEM related fields, especially if you have also worked with students requiring accommodations. This volunteer position requires you to use your own equipment to record, however, we will provide the reading materials. If you or someone you know would like to try reading material for the members only section, please contact me for more information on how to submit a demo recording.

We need help updating our available resources for members. If you are blind and enjoy using your ham radio or assistive technology related devices, your assistance is especially needed. It would be a big help to your fellow Handiham Members if you would record a tutorial or product review. These need to be sent in Mp3 format, and the Handiham Program reserves the right to edit the recordings as needed before publishing in the Members Only section of the Handiham.org website. Please contact me at Lucinda.Moody@... or 612-775-2290 if you have any questions.

I want to say a big thank you to those who have made or volunteered to make tutorials for the Members Only portion of the website. We have already had a number of members step up to offer their services, and their help is greatly appreciated! We also have some new readers who are working on some books, so keep watching for website updates as we add more content.


Check into our Handiham nets… Everyone is welcome!

How to find the Handiham Net:

  • The Handiham EchoLink conference is 494492. Connect via your iPhone, Android phone, PC, or on a connected simplex node or repeater system in your area.
  • The Handiham DMR Talkgroup on Brandmeister is 31990. On AllStar, it is available at node 47367.
  • The Handiham Net will be on the air daily. If there is no net control station on any scheduled net day, we will have a roundtable on the air get-together.

Cartoon multicolored stickman family holding hands, one wheelchair user among them.

Our daily Echolink net continues to operate for anyone and everyone who wishes to participate at 11:00 hours CDT (Noon Eastern and 09:00 Pacific), as well as Wednesday evenings at 19:00 hours CDT (7 PM). If you calculate GMT, the time difference is that GMT is five hours ahead of Minnesota time during the summer.

Doug, N6NFF, poses a trivia question in the first half of the Wednesday evening session, so check in early if you want to take a guess. The answer to the trivia question is generally given shortly after the half-hour mark. A big THANK YOU to all of our net control stations.


Membership

·       You can pay your Handiham dues and certain other program fees on line. Simply follow the link to our secure payment site, then enter your information and submit the payment.

    • Handiham annual membership dues are $15.00. The lifetime membership rate is $150.00.  MEMBERSHIP DUES PAYMENT LINK
    • If you want to donate to the Handiham Program, please use our donation website. The instructions are at the following link:  DONATION LINK

·       As always, while our other services require that you have a current Handiham Program membership, you do not have to be a member to receive the Handiham World E-Letter.

How to contact us

There are several ways to contact us.

Postal Mail:

Courage Kenny Handiham Program
3915 Golden Valley Road MR 78446
Golden Valley, MN 55422

E-Mail: handiham@...

Preferred telephone: 1-612-775-2291
Toll-Free telephone: 1-866-HANDIHAM (1-866-426-3442)

Note: Tuesdays through Thursdays between 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM United States Central Time are the best times to contact us.

You may also call Handiham Program Coordinator Lucinda Moody, AB8WF, at: 612-775-2290.

73, and I hope to hear you on the air soon!

For Handiham World, this is Lucinda Moody, AB8WF

The weekly e-letter is a compilation of assistive technology, operating information, and Handiham Program news. It is published on Mondays, and is available to everyone free of charge. Please email handiham@... for changes of address, unsubscribes, etc. Include your old email address and your new address.

 

 


W0ZSW Activation for the Handiham Special Event Station

Moody, Lucinda K
 

W0ZSW Activation Notice:  Matt Arthur, KA0PQW, will be on 40 meters today, starting around 4pm Central Daylight time or 2100 UTC, in the General portion of the band.  He is planning to be around 7.175 and above in the phone portion of the band and around 7.040 in the cw portion of the band.  If you would like to set up a schedule, please contact him directly at ka0pqw@...

 

2020 Handiham Special Event Station

August 7, 5pm CDT (2200 UTC) to August 9, 11pm CDT (August 10, 0400 UTC)

Purpose:

This event provides an opportunity for all Handiham Members to get on the radio, make contacts, and have fun.  This event also allows students who just attended a week of classes in operating skills to practice newly acquired skills.

Suggested information to share if working phone and not on a repeater or Echolink:

CQ CQ CQ Handiham Radio Club special event in honor of the Handiham Program celebrating 53 years of helping people with disabilities participate in the amateur radio hobby. CQ CQ CQ [your call sign]

If working CW, the suggested call is CQ HH. 

Exchange:

Signal report, QTH, and your name and call sign.
Advise the contact that there is a special QSL card for this event and instructions are available at Handiham.org.

Log:

Include your call sign and QTH and station description
Date / UTC Time / Call sign / band / mode / signal report

Logs are due no later than August 31st

Prize categories:

• VHF/UHF (including Echolink and Repeaters)
• All Band Unlimited (VHF/UHF/HF—including Echolink and Repeaters)

 

 


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