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Sanding Sealer (was: A Rookie and La Belle Kits)


Bill Lugg
 

Maybe this has been covered and I missed it...

What are folks using for a sanding sealer on wood these days to get that hard varnish appearance on passenger cars, for example?

Thanks
Bill Lugg

On 9/11/20 5:05 PM, LARRY KLOSE wrote:

I built my first LaBelle kit shortly after the passenger cars were introduced—I still remember the issue of Model Railroader with a photo of the introductory kit on the cover, January 1960.  I was 13 and I built the same kit as reviewed with little difficulty.  It was one of the first really complex craft kits I built.  I had few problems and it came out fine.  I think the kits are a good starter as long as the instructions are followed.  Painting will be the most difficult thing to deal with; as a nearly all wood kit it will need either solvent based paints or an application of either sanding sealer or primer before painting with acrylics to discourage warping and raised grain.

I’ve found that just jumping in and doing it is the best way to get going.

Good luck!

Larry

PS: According to the review that kit retailed for $4.95, postpaid.


asandrini
 

In the hobby business, I saw all kinds of things my R/C customers would do. To improvise their own sanding asked. They would mix a little talcum powder with some lacquer. I'm  guessing about 1/4 teaspoon to four ounces of lacquer.  I would think you could mix it with acrylic lacquer as well.  Shake well, brush it on, then sand with some 600 or finer sandpaper.

Al



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: Bill Lugg <luggw1@...>
Date: 9/11/20 4:28 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] Sanding Sealer (was: A Rookie and La Belle Kits)

Maybe this has been covered and I missed it...

What are folks using for a sanding sealer on wood these days to get that
hard varnish appearance on passenger cars, for example?

Thanks
Bill Lugg


On 9/11/20 5:05 PM, LARRY KLOSE wrote:
>
> I built my first LaBelle kit shortly after the passenger cars were
> introduced—I still remember the issue of Model Railroader with a photo
> of the introductory kit on the cover, January 1960.  I was 13 and I
> built the same kit as reviewed with little difficulty.  It was one of
> the first really complex craft kits I built.  I had few problems and
> it came out fine.  I think the kits are a good starter as long as the
> instructions are followed.  Painting will be the most difficult thing
> to deal with; as a nearly all wood kit it will need either solvent
> based paints or an application of either sanding sealer or primer
> before painting with acrylics to discourage warping and raised grain.
>
> I’ve found that just jumping in and doing it is the best way to get
> going.
>
> Good luck!
>
> Larry
>
> PS: According to the review that kit retailed for $4.95, postpaid.
>
>




George Saridakis
 

Hi Bill,

I spray shellac (Zinser rattle can) on both sides of wood parts, and let dry overnight, even though it seems to be dry to the touch pretty quickly.

Cheers,
George


Bill Nelson
 

I  spray  the  assembled  cars  with  gray  primer  on  the  outside,  and  tan  on  the  inside,  and very  lightly  sand  the  outside  before  either  spray  or  brush  painting  them.  sometimes,  when  I  feel  organized,  I  spray  sub  assemblies,  but  it  always  needs  some  more  on  the  outside  when  fully  assembled.


On Sep 12, 2020, at 8:09 AM, George Saridakis <georgesaridakis559@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,

I spray shellac (Zinser rattle can) on both sides of wood parts, and let dry overnight, even though it seems to be dry to the touch pretty quickly.

Cheers,
George