Topics

Roadbed Material Question


Ted Wilton
 

I am getting ready to start my first layout, and I am considering using either Homasote or Flexxbed material for the roadbed. I live in northwestern Nevada [really dry here!] so humidity impacts on the Homasote would not be much of an issue. Would appreciate any thoughts or comments you might have!

Regards,

TED


kevin b
 

I have used homasote in the past, had no issues with it.

a 4'X8' sheet of it doesn't really cost that much and will make a BUNCH of roadbed.

Kevin.





I am getting ready to start my first layout, and I am considering using either Homasote or Flexxbed material for the roadbed. I live in northwestern Nevada [really dry here!] so humidity impacts on the Homasote would not be much of an issue. Would appreciate any thoughts or comments you might have!

Regards,

TED


Alan Kilby
 

Homasote is hard to find,I live in Reno and have not been able to find it anywhere local.Portland locomotive works sells it but their not local.You need homasote to hold spikes if handlaying track,cork and foam won't hold them.
If using premade track cork would be cheaper and easier to find.Seeing as Roseville/Sacramento is closest hobby/train store you may wish to order online.
Alan


Rick Rhode
 

Hi Ted,
     I live in NC where humidity IS a problem.  I have used both cork and homasote roadbed.  I really like the homasote.  It is easy to work with, cuts very easily, takes and hold spikes great.  As long as you glue it down on a plywood or spline sub-roadbed with carpenters wood glue, it will not expand or contract in humid conditions,  You should have no problems in Nevada.  Happy building!
                                                                                           Rick

On Saturday, April 25, 2020, 12:12:45 PM EDT, Ted <twilton@...> wrote:


I am getting ready to start my first layout, and I am considering using either Homasote or Flexxbed material for the roadbed. I live in northwestern Nevada [really dry here!] so humidity impacts on the Homasote would not be much of an issue. Would appreciate any thoughts or comments you might have!

Regards,

TED


Mike Conder
 

Check with your big box orange or blue lumber store. They can often do special orders; a friend did that successfully. 

And I think most are still open now. 

Mike Conder

On Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 11:47 AM Rick Rhode via groups.io <rvrhode=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Ted,
     I live in NC where humidity IS a problem.  I have used both cork and homasote roadbed.  I really like the homasote.  It is easy to work with, cuts very easily, takes and hold spikes great.  As long as you glue it down on a plywood or spline sub-roadbed with carpenters wood glue, it will not expand or contract in humid conditions,  You should have no problems in Nevada.  Happy building!
                                                                                           Rick

On Saturday, April 25, 2020, 12:12:45 PM EDT, Ted <twilton@...> wrote:


I am getting ready to start my first layout, and I am considering using either Homasote or Flexxbed material for the roadbed. I live in northwestern Nevada [really dry here!] so humidity impacts on the Homasote would not be much of an issue. Would appreciate any thoughts or comments you might have!

Regards,

TED


Robert Weaver
 

Homasote is excellent.  Have been using it for years both as sheets and cut as roadbed.  It is messy to cut.   Yes it can be hard to find.   I have found it (1/2 inch thick x 3 1/2 inch wide x 10 ft long strips - as Homex Expansion Joint Board) at Home Depot in the concrete section for around $3.25 per piece.  It is utilized for making concrete forms.   One side is kind of dimple the other is flat.  It is too wide to bend, but it still works pretty good.    Occasionally a sheet is a little off on dimension thickness by about 1/16 of an inch.   I find it best to put it all down then use a hand sander (random orbital)  to get it all level anyway.    The other nice thing is it can be transported from store to home pretty easily in any vehicle due to its smaller size (not a 4x8 sheet).  Check it out.  

RobW


On Apr 25, 2020, at 10:33 AM, Alan Kilby <alankilby@...> wrote:


Homasote is hard to find,I live in Reno and have not been able to find it anywhere local.Portland locomotive works sells it but their not local.You need homasote to hold spikes if handlaying track,cork and foam won't hold them.
If using premade track cork would be cheaper and easier to find.Seeing as Roseville/Sacramento is closest hobby/train store you may wish to order online.
Alan


Bill Lugg
 

Where do you get your homasote from?  I live in Colorado and have never been able to find any.

Bill Lugg

On 4/25/20 11:25 AM, kevin b via groups.io wrote:
I have used homasote in the past, had no issues with it.

a 4'X8' sheet of it doesn't really cost that much and will make a BUNCH of roadbed.

Kevin.





I am getting ready to start my first layout, and I am considering using either Homasote or Flexxbed material for the roadbed. I live in northwestern Nevada [really dry here!] so humidity impacts on the Homasote would not be much of an issue. Would appreciate any thoughts or comments you might have!

Regards,

TED


Dusty
 

I like Homabed. Homabed is no longer being made as far as I know. It appears Cascade Rail Supply closed around February 15. There may be more recent developments I'm unaware of.

I like Homabed where a roadbed profile is necessary. I like sheet homosote for town and yard applications. The CATS and D & S current tourist operations appear to have better roadbed than vintage prototype photos indicate. Who knows what's appropriate for a 'typical' 3 foot gauge roadbed profile? Each of us see things differently.

Dusty Burman 


Alan Kilby
 

Portland locomotive works cuts to order,person who works there said they are comparable to homabed.


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of Dusty <Dustburm@q.com>
Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2020 11:14:32 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Roadbed Material Question
 
I like Homabed. Homabed is no longer being made as far as I know. It appears Cascade Rail Supply closed around February 15. There may be more recent developments I'm unaware of.

I like Homabed where a roadbed profile is necessary. I like sheet homosote for town and yard applications. The CATS and D & S current tourist operations appear to have better roadbed than vintage prototype photos indicate. Who knows what's appropriate for a 'typical' 3 foot gauge roadbed profile? Each of us see things differently.

Dusty Burman 


claneon30
 

Adams Lumber on Arapahoe in Centennial USED to carry it. I have no idea if they still do.

Chris Lane - Editor HOn3 Annual



On Apr 25, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:

Where do you get your homasote from?  I live in Colorado and have never been able to find any.

Bill Lugg


On 4/25/20 11:25 AM, kevin b via groups.io wrote:
I have used homasote in the past, had no issues with it.

a 4'X8' sheet of it doesn't really cost that much and will make a BUNCH of roadbed.

Kevin.





I am getting ready to start my first layout, and I am considering using either Homasote or Flexxbed material for the roadbed. I live in northwestern Nevada [really dry here!] so humidity impacts on the Homasote would not be much of an issue. Would appreciate any thoughts or comments you might have!

Regards,

TED



Dale Buxton
 

Austin Hardwoods in Denver has it. There is a building supplier in the north Aurora industrial park that has it too. Forget it’s name, but it’s off of Chambers Road south of I-70.

Dale Buxton

On Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 15:57 claneon30 <chrislaneon30@...> wrote:
Adams Lumber on Arapahoe in Centennial USED to carry it. I have no idea if they still do.

Chris Lane - Editor HOn3 Annual



On Apr 25, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:

Where do you get your homasote from?  I live in Colorado and have never been able to find any.

Bill Lugg


On 4/25/20 11:25 AM, kevin b via groups.io wrote:
I have used homasote in the past, had no issues with it.

a 4'X8' sheet of it doesn't really cost that much and will make a BUNCH of roadbed.

Kevin.





I am getting ready to start my first layout, and I am considering using either Homasote or Flexxbed material for the roadbed. I live in northwestern Nevada [really dry here!] so humidity impacts on the Homasote would not be much of an issue. Would appreciate any thoughts or comments you might have!

Regards,

TED



Mike Conder
 

I have a couple of 4x8 sheets that I can probably sell.  

Mine Conder 

On Sun, Apr 26, 2020, 2:57 PM Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...> wrote:
Austin Hardwoods in Denver has it. There is a building supplier in the north Aurora industrial park that has it too. Forget it’s name, but it’s off of Chambers Road south of I-70.

Dale Buxton

On Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 15:57 claneon30 <chrislaneon30@...> wrote:
Adams Lumber on Arapahoe in Centennial USED to carry it. I have no idea if they still do.

Chris Lane - Editor HOn3 Annual



On Apr 25, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:

Where do you get your homasote from?  I live in Colorado and have never been able to find any.

Bill Lugg


On 4/25/20 11:25 AM, kevin b via groups.io wrote:
I have used homasote in the past, had no issues with it.

a 4'X8' sheet of it doesn't really cost that much and will make a BUNCH of roadbed.

Kevin.





I am getting ready to start my first layout, and I am considering using either Homasote or Flexxbed material for the roadbed. I live in northwestern Nevada [really dry here!] so humidity impacts on the Homasote would not be much of an issue. Would appreciate any thoughts or comments you might have!

Regards,

TED



David Zolnierek
 

Take a look at a product   #440 Homasote board  ½” x 4 x 8’   used  for sound deading   between rooms.  I have been using it for years on layouts .and in my building career, and available at any good lumber yard, Lowes, HD , Menards

 

 

David

 

PRESERVING THE HISTORY of RED MOUNTAIN

_._,_._,_


Tom Ludlam
 

Ask for sound board.  Most lumber yard attendants will just stare at you when asking for Homasote.

Used in home theater construction between the framing and regular wall board.

Tom

--
McLean Depot
266 E Dixie Rd
PO Box 266
McLean IL 61754
mcleandepot.com
309-244-5900
M-F 10-6
Sat 10-5


burrst54
 

If you end up using Homasote, look for a "knife edge" blade for your handheld jigsaw, which seriously cuts down on dust when cutting.

Burr Stewart
Seattle WA


Lawrence Wisniewski <lwreno@...>
 

I tried this years ago, but was very disappointed by the slow cutting action compared to regular saw blades.  I eventually opted for the mess and pulled my shop vac around with me where ever I could.  Then there's the big problem of variable thickness.  It can't be ignored unless you are deliberately after backwoods logging quality roadbed.  To counter the thickness problem, I developed alot of really large sanding blocks and got the vacuum out again.  It was very hard work and I found it virtually impossible to sand that stuff down to an acceptable uniform thickness in a single lifetime.. The next time I got the bug to build a layout, I invested in homabed's pre milled and sloped cut pieces.  That allowed pretty nice track work with flex track with only a little sanding here and there.  Note that I don't know what large sheets of homosote are like to work with now.  My experiences with the lumber yard variety took place in the 80's and 90's.  There may have been some manufacturing improvements since then.  Hopefully. 


-----Original Message-----
From: burrst54 <burr.stewart@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Apr 27, 2020 2:22 pm
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Roadbed Material Question

If you end up using Homasote, look for a "knife edge" blade for your handheld jigsaw, which seriously cuts down on dust when cutting.

Burr Stewart
Seattle WA


Jim Spencer
 

On Mon, Apr 27, 2020 at 12:01 PM, Lawrence Wisniewski wrote:
I tried this years ago, but was very disappointed by the slow cutting action compared to regular saw blades.  I eventually opted for the mess and pulled my shop vac around with me where ever I could.  Then there's the big problem of variable thickness.  It can't be ignored unless you are deliberately after backwoods logging quality roadbed.  To counter the thickness problem, I developed alot of really large sanding blocks and got the vacuum out again.  It was very hard work and I found it virtually impossible to sand that stuff down to an acceptable uniform thickness in a single lifetime.. The next time I got the bug to build a layout, I invested in homabed's pre milled and sloped cut pieces.  That allowed pretty nice track work with flex track with only a little sanding here and there.  Note that I don't know what large sheets of homosote are like to work with now.  My experiences with the lumber yard variety took place in the 80's and 90's.  There may have been some manufacturing improvements since then.  Hopefully. 


-----Original Message-----
From: burrst54 <burr.stewart@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Apr 27, 2020 2:22 pm
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Roadbed Material Question

If you end up using Homasote, look for a "knife edge" blade for your handheld jigsaw, which seriously cuts down on dust when cutting.

Burr Stewart
Seattle WA

 After using Homosote previously, I switched to 2” extruded styrene foam panels available in 4 x 8 sizes. I bond it to thin plywood door skin panels also 4x8 using a water based construction adhesive (don’t use solvent-based adhesives!). I make up composited panels


Jim Marlett
 

I haven’t noticed the irregularity of Homasote thickness, although it has been a while since I purchased new. Maybe it is a problem if you use flex track, but I hand lay my track and I don’t normally sand the Homasote. I sand the ties after they are glued in place since ties aren’t that perfect either. A very long time ago (1971 maybe?) I used flex track on Homasote and I didn’t notice any unevenness then, either. The only time I sand Homasote is when I am smoothing a joint or repair.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Apr 27, 2020, at 2:01 PM, Lawrence Wisniewski via groups.io <lwreno@...> wrote:

I tried this years ago, but was very disappointed by the slow cutting action compared to regular saw blades.  I eventually opted for the mess and pulled my shop vac around with me where ever I could.  Then there's the big problem of variable thickness.  It can't be ignored unless you are deliberately after backwoods logging quality roadbed.  To counter the thickness problem, I developed alot of really large sanding blocks and got the vacuum out again.  It was very hard work and I found it virtually impossible to sand that stuff down to an acceptable uniform thickness in a single lifetime.. The next time I got the bug to build a layout, I invested in homabed's pre milled and sloped cut pieces.  That allowed pretty nice track work with flex track with only a little sanding here and there.  Note that I don't know what large sheets of homosote are like to work with now.  My experiences with the lumber yard variety took place in the 80's and 90's.  There may have been some manufacturing improvements since then.  Hopefully. 


-----Original Message-----
From: burrst54 <burr.stewart@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Apr 27, 2020 2:22 pm
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Roadbed Material Question

If you end up using Homasote, look for a "knife edge" blade for your handheld jigsaw, which seriously cuts down on dust when cutting.

Burr Stewart
Seattle WA


lloyd lehrer
 

Jim, I had just the same response with the uneven homasote. BUT I USED FLEXTRACK and just let it float over the surface and then filled the low areas with decomposed granite rather than concern with getting it uniformly flat. Before hand.

lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097

On Mon, Apr 27, 2020, 4:38 PM Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:
I haven’t noticed the irregularity of Homasote thickness, although it has been a while since I purchased new. Maybe it is a problem if you use flex track, but I hand lay my track and I don’t normally sand the Homasote. I sand the ties after they are glued in place since ties aren’t that perfect either. A very long time ago (1971 maybe?) I used flex track on Homasote and I didn’t notice any unevenness then, either. The only time I sand Homasote is when I am smoothing a joint or repair.

On Apr 27, 2020, at 2:01 PM, Lawrence Wisniewski via groups.io <lwreno@...> wrote:

I tried this years ago, but was very disappointed by the slow cutting action compared to regular saw blades.  I eventually opted for the mess and pulled my shop vac around with me where ever I could.  Then there's the big problem of variable thickness.  It can't be ignored unless you are deliberately after backwoods logging quality roadbed.  To counter the thickness problem, I developed alot of really large sanding blocks and got the vacuum out again.  It was very hard work and I found it virtually impossible to sand that stuff down to an acceptable uniform thickness in a single lifetime.. The next time I got the bug to build a layout, I invested in homabed's pre milled and sloped cut pieces.  That allowed pretty nice track work with flex track with only a little sanding here and there.  Note that I don't know what large sheets of homosote are like to work with now.  My experiences with the lumber yard variety took place in the 80's and 90's.  There may have been some manufacturing improvements since then.  Hopefully. 


-----Original Message-----
From: burrst54 <burr.stewart@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Apr 27, 2020 2:22 pm
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Roadbed Material Question

If you end up using Homasote, look for a "knife edge" blade for your handheld jigsaw, which seriously cuts down on dust when cutting.

Burr Stewart
Seattle WA


--
lloyd lehrer


Jim Marlett
 

It is entirely possible that the product just isn’t the same as when I bought mine. It was a long time ago – maybe the early ‘80s. I still have a full 4x8 sheet from that purchase and yes, I am going to use it, probably before the year is over. Maybe I’ll get to test some new stuff when the old stuff is finally gone.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Apr 27, 2020, at 10:00 PM, lloyd lehrer <lloydlehrer@...> wrote:

Jim, I had just the same response with the uneven homasote. BUT I USED FLEXTRACK and just let it float over the surface and then filled the low areas with decomposed granite rather than concern with getting it uniformly flat. Before hand.

lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097

On Mon, Apr 27, 2020, 4:38 PM Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:
I haven’t noticed the irregularity of Homasote thickness, although it has been a while since I purchased new. Maybe it is a problem if you use flex track, but I hand lay my track and I don’t normally sand the Homasote. I sand the ties after they are glued in place since ties aren’t that perfect either. A very long time ago (1971 maybe?) I used flex track on Homasote and I didn’t notice any unevenness then, either. The only time I sand Homasote is when I am smoothing a joint or repair.

On Apr 27, 2020, at 2:01 PM, Lawrence Wisniewski via groups.io <lwreno@...> wrote:

I tried this years ago, but was very disappointed by the slow cutting action compared to regular saw blades.  I eventually opted for the mess and pulled my shop vac around with me where ever I could.  Then there's the big problem of variable thickness.  It can't be ignored unless you are deliberately after backwoods logging quality roadbed.  To counter the thickness problem, I developed alot of really large sanding blocks and got the vacuum out again.  It was very hard work and I found it virtually impossible to sand that stuff down to an acceptable uniform thickness in a single lifetime.. The next time I got the bug to build a layout, I invested in homabed's pre milled and sloped cut pieces.  That allowed pretty nice track work with flex track with only a little sanding here and there.  Note that I don't know what large sheets of homosote are like to work with now.  My experiences with the lumber yard variety took place in the 80's and 90's.  There may have been some manufacturing improvements since then.  Hopefully. 


-----Original Message-----
From: burrst54 <burr.stewart@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Apr 27, 2020 2:22 pm
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Roadbed Material Question

If you end up using Homasote, look for a "knife edge" blade for your handheld jigsaw, which seriously cuts down on dust when cutting.

Burr Stewart
Seattle WA




-- 
lloyd lehrer