Topics

Rio Grande Models--is there a future?


John Cytron
 

Perhaps I  missed this, but with the retirement of Eric Bracher and closing of Rio Grande Models, is a anyone going to buy the business or is it even for sale? I would hate to see all that great work in the castings and kits suddenly disappear forever.

John


Lawrence Wisniewski
 

I recall reading a post from someone on this list who claimed that some kind of negotiations were underway.  That was the extent of what was said.  I haven't seen anything else reported in my web rambles, and considerable time has passed.  An update from this source would be appreciated.  I would assume that it might be difficult to find a buyer for a mainly white metal business these days.As I recall, the source of the negotiation comment mentioned something about converting the technology to printing.  I have no idea what that would entail.


-----Original Message-----
From: John Cytron <rgsjohnny@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 8, 2020 2:37 pm
Subject: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

Perhaps I  missed this, but with the retirement of Eric Bracher and closing of Rio Grande Models, is a anyone going to buy the business or is it even for sale? I would hate to see all that great work in the castings and kits suddenly disappear forever.

John


James Kendig
 

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 04:08 AM, Lawrence Wisniewski wrote:
I recall reading a post from someone on this list who claimed that some kind of negotiations were underway.  That was the extent of what was said.  I haven't seen anything else reported in my web rambles, and considerable time has passed.  An update from this source would be appreciated.  I would assume that it might be difficult to find a buyer for a mainly white metal business these days.As I recall, the source of the negotiation comment mentioned something about converting the technology to printing.  I have no idea what that would entail.


-----Original Message-----
From: John Cytron <rgsjohnny@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 8, 2020 2:37 pm
Subject: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

Perhaps I  missed this, but with the retirement of Eric Bracher and closing of Rio Grande Models, is a anyone going to buy the business or is it even for sale? I would hate to see all that great work in the castings and kits suddenly disappear forever.

John

 A relative has been selling some in stock parts on Facebook.  I will look him up and see if he knows what is going on.  He can be found at Rio Grande Models on Facebook.
Jim


Dale Buxton
 

John, 

I think your question has elicited the same crickets that have been chirping on this subject since Eric closed up shop.

However, someone has been looking into buying Rio Grande. They have to be thinking about this. If you bought any of Rio Grande's kits since the outlaw of Lead in toys and hobbies and  just about all products save for Lead-core batteries etc. You would note that the weight is gone in the kits metal and that the metal is more brittle than with the older Lead bearing metal. This is because the new metal was mostly Tin. This forced switch to a Lead-less alloys had a profound effect on the white metal mom and pop casting industry. Tin is greatly more expensive. Casters making figures for wargaming have mostly switched to Urethane resins. If I were buying a white metal casting business, I would be seriously thinking about my materials cost too.

3D printing has come a long way to be sure. But it still lacks the economy of scale to be cost effective for most mom and pop operations. But, it will eventually get there. Of that I am sure.

Dale Buxton

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 3:08 AM Lawrence Wisniewski via groups.io <lwreno=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I recall reading a post from someone on this list who claimed that some kind of negotiations were underway.  That was the extent of what was said.  I haven't seen anything else reported in my web rambles, and considerable time has passed.  An update from this source would be appreciated.  I would assume that it might be difficult to find a buyer for a mainly white metal business these days.As I recall, the source of the negotiation comment mentioned something about converting the technology to printing.  I have no idea what that would entail.


-----Original Message-----
From: John Cytron <rgsjohnny@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 8, 2020 2:37 pm
Subject: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

Perhaps I  missed this, but with the retirement of Eric Bracher and closing of Rio Grande Models, is a anyone going to buy the business or is it even for sale? I would hate to see all that great work in the castings and kits suddenly disappear forever.

John


Bill Lugg
 

Within just the last few weeks I received some trucks from Eric. The castings are absolutely beautiful - not the kind of white metal castings one is used to seeing in old Walthers or Mantua kits.  They are somewhat fragile, but sideframe cross sections are fine and the castings are clean and crisp.

That said, Dale makes good points regarding lead content.  The other issue with 3D printing, at least in my experience, is that we're just now on the cusp of being able to reproduce those thin cross sections modelers need in items like arch bar trucks, for example. SLA is close, very close, I think, but not quite there yet.  The other issue is that it's very expensive on a production level vs. a casting approach.  Making a mold or die and casting a large quantity of a part will be substantially less expensive that 3D printing the same part in most cases - depends on the demand for the part I suppose.

Bill Lugg

On 8/9/20 6:18 AM, Dale Buxton wrote:
John,

I think your question has elicited the same crickets that have been chirping on this subject since Eric closed up shop.

However, someone has been looking into buying Rio Grande. They have to be thinking about this. If you bought any of Rio Grande's kits since the outlaw of Lead in toys and hobbies and just about all products save for Lead-core batteries etc. You would note that the weight is gone in the kits metal and that the metal is more brittle than with the older Lead bearing metal. This is because the new metal was mostly Tin. This forced switch to a Lead-less alloys had a profound effect on the white metal mom and pop casting industry. Tin is greatly more expensive. Casters making figures for wargaming have mostly switched to Urethane resins. If I were buying a white metal casting business, I would be seriously thinking about my materials cost too.

3D printing has come a long way to be sure. But it still lacks the economy of scale to be cost effective for most mom and pop operations. But, it will eventually get there. Of that I am sure.

Dale Buxton


Mark Rosche
 

IMHO 3D printing is not for mass production of parts but rather a quick prototyping method...that being said, for small runs of custom parts there is nothing more economical than 3D printing as injection molds are bloody expensive 👍🏻😁

Regards,

Mark

Don‘t take life too seriously...no one gets out alive anyway....

On 9. Aug 2020, at 16:06, Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:

Within just the last few weeks I received some trucks from Eric. The castings are absolutely beautiful - not the kind of white metal castings one is used to seeing in old Walthers or Mantua kits.  They are somewhat fragile, but sideframe cross sections are fine and the castings are clean and crisp.

That said, Dale makes good points regarding lead content.  The other issue with 3D printing, at least in my experience, is that we're just now on the cusp of being able to reproduce those thin cross sections modelers need in items like arch bar trucks, for example. SLA is close, very close, I think, but not quite there yet.  The other issue is that it's very expensive on a production level vs. a casting approach.  Making a mold or die and casting a large quantity of a part will be substantially less expensive that 3D printing the same part in most cases - depends on the demand for the part I suppose.

Bill Lugg


On 8/9/20 6:18 AM, Dale Buxton wrote:
John,

I think your question has elicited the same crickets that have been chirping on this subject since Eric closed up shop.

However, someone has been looking into buying Rio Grande. They have to be thinking about this. If you bought any of Rio Grande's kits since the outlaw of Lead in toys and hobbies and just about all products save for Lead-core batteries etc. You would note that the weight is gone in the kits metal and that the metal is more brittle than with the older Lead bearing metal. This is because the new metal was mostly Tin. This forced switch to a Lead-less alloys had a profound effect on the white metal mom and pop casting industry. Tin is greatly more expensive. Casters making figures for wargaming have mostly switched to Urethane resins. If I were buying a white metal casting business, I would be seriously thinking about my materials cost too.

3D printing has come a long way to be sure. But it still lacks the economy of scale to be cost effective for most mom and pop operations. But, it will eventually get there. Of that I am sure.

Dale Buxton






Lawrence Wisniewski
 

You mentioned the outlawing of lead use in castings.  Do you know exactly when this went into effect?  My impression is that lead has not been used by anyone for a long time but I can't recall when it first started.  Thanks.


-----Original Message-----
From: Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 9, 2020 8:18 am
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

John, 

I think your question has elicited the same crickets that have been chirping on this subject since Eric closed up shop.

However, someone has been looking into buying Rio Grande. They have to be thinking about this. If you bought any of Rio Grande's kits since the outlaw of Lead in toys and hobbies and  just about all products save for Lead-core batteries etc. You would note that the weight is gone in the kits metal and that the metal is more brittle than with the older Lead bearing metal. This is because the new metal was mostly Tin. This forced switch to a Lead-less alloys had a profound effect on the white metal mom and pop casting industry. Tin is greatly more expensive. Casters making figures for wargaming have mostly switched to Urethane resins. If I were buying a white metal casting business, I would be seriously thinking about my materials cost too.

3D printing has come a long way to be sure. But it still lacks the economy of scale to be cost effective for most mom and pop operations. But, it will eventually get there. Of that I am sure.

Dale Buxton

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 3:08 AM Lawrence Wisniewski via groups.io <lwreno=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I recall reading a post from someone on this list who claimed that some kind of negotiations were underway.  That was the extent of what was said.  I haven't seen anything else reported in my web rambles, and considerable time has passed.  An update from this source would be appreciated.  I would assume that it might be difficult to find a buyer for a mainly white metal business these days.As I recall, the source of the negotiation comment mentioned something about converting the technology to printing.  I have no idea what that would entail.


-----Original Message-----
From: John Cytron <rgsjohnny@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 8, 2020 2:37 pm
Subject: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

Perhaps I  missed this, but with the retirement of Eric Bracher and closing of Rio Grande Models, is a anyone going to buy the business or is it even for sale? I would hate to see all that great work in the castings and kits suddenly disappear forever.

John


Mark Rosche
 

in the USA I believe it was 1996 (California was the first state if my info is correct)...in Europe it was 1994.

Regards,

Mark

Don‘t take life too seriously...no one gets out alive anyway....

On 9. Aug 2020, at 17:33, Lawrence Wisniewski via groups.io <lwreno@...> wrote:


You mentioned the outlawing of lead use in castings.  Do you know exactly when this went into effect?  My impression is that lead has not been used by anyone for a long time but I can't recall when it first started.  Thanks.


-----Original Message-----
From: Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 9, 2020 8:18 am
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

John, 

I think your question has elicited the same crickets that have been chirping on this subject since Eric closed up shop.

However, someone has been looking into buying Rio Grande. They have to be thinking about this. If you bought any of Rio Grande's kits since the outlaw of Lead in toys and hobbies and  just about all products save for Lead-core batteries etc. You would note that the weight is gone in the kits metal and that the metal is more brittle than with the older Lead bearing metal. This is because the new metal was mostly Tin. This forced switch to a Lead-less alloys had a profound effect on the white metal mom and pop casting industry. Tin is greatly more expensive. Casters making figures for wargaming have mostly switched to Urethane resins. If I were buying a white metal casting business, I would be seriously thinking about my materials cost too.

3D printing has come a long way to be sure. But it still lacks the economy of scale to be cost effective for most mom and pop operations. But, it will eventually get there. Of that I am sure.

Dale Buxton

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 3:08 AM Lawrence Wisniewski via groups.io <lwreno=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I recall reading a post from someone on this list who claimed that some kind of negotiations were underway.  That was the extent of what was said.  I haven't seen anything else reported in my web rambles, and considerable time has passed.  An update from this source would be appreciated.  I would assume that it might be difficult to find a buyer for a mainly white metal business these days.As I recall, the source of the negotiation comment mentioned something about converting the technology to printing.  I have no idea what that would entail.


-----Original Message-----
From: John Cytron <rgsjohnny@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 8, 2020 2:37 pm
Subject: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

Perhaps I  missed this, but with the retirement of Eric Bracher and closing of Rio Grande Models, is a anyone going to buy the business or is it even for sale? I would hate to see all that great work in the castings and kits suddenly disappear forever.

John


Climax@...
 

I believe the quantity of lead in alloys has been reduced over the years.  There are other metals which melt at low temperatures but they cost a lot more.  I use to make a lot of pewter chess set figures and it was fun to do.  After I cast them up and cleaned the castings flash up, of which there was little I would paint them in their appropriate colors and then clear coat them.  The transfer of any lead in the compound was almost impossible.  The casting material comes from Ireland, "Prince August" but due to weight is tough to get to the USA.  When I flew there and back I would bring back a bunch in my carry on, and even those days are seldom now.  Bismuth I think is the name of the alloy now days.  I still have a lot of it, actually I melt it on my stove and pour it into the molds right there.  Takes on the tiniest details and even makes the  log runs up staffs and spiers or swords.  The secret is to use baby powder dusted on the molds just prior to pouring.  Alloys do make lead harder which is what you want.  If you pour just lead, it is soft and will almost bend under its own weight.  California set the standards and they have screwed up a lot of stuff we use to the point the manufacturer no longer can produce.  Find a lead roof flashing to put around a vent pipe today.  If you find one get it as it will be a life time supply of weights and can be easily cut with a pair or sheers.  It is also malleable and can be formed into the smallest places.  I have melted it and put it into boilers.  I first start with doubled piece of aluminum foil which I put inside the cavity I want the weight to go into.  I use a wooden pencil to push the aluminum around the boiler insides and to the end.  I carefully remove it, set it in a box of sand, then pour the lead in the aluminum foil mold.  When its cooled, I remove the aluminum foil and file any imperfections away while checking the fit into the boiler.  Once it fits I put it in and find a hole in the brass in which I can mark a spot to drill.  I remove the lead, drill a hole, put it back in and use a counter sunk screw to secure the lead in place.  Works like a champ.
DB

-----Original Message-----
From: "Lawrence Wisniewski via groups.io"
Sent: Aug 9, 2020 11:33 AM
To: "HOn3@groups.io"
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

You mentioned the outlawing of lead use in castings.  Do you know exactly when this went into effect?  My impression is that lead has not been used by anyone for a long time but I can't recall when it first started.  Thanks.


-----Original Message-----
From: Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 9, 2020 8:18 am
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

John, 

I think your question has elicited the same crickets that have been chirping on this subject since Eric closed up shop.

However, someone has been looking into buying Rio Grande. They have to be thinking about this. If you bought any of Rio Grande's kits since the outlaw of Lead in toys and hobbies and  just about all products save for Lead-core batteries etc. You would note that the weight is gone in the kits metal and that the metal is more brittle than with the older Lead bearing metal. This is because the new metal was mostly Tin. This forced switch to a Lead-less alloys had a profound effect on the white metal mom and pop casting industry. Tin is greatly more expensive. Casters making figures for wargaming have mostly switched to Urethane resins. If I were buying a white metal casting business, I would be seriously thinking about my materials cost too.

3D printing has come a long way to be sure. But it still lacks the economy of scale to be cost effective for most mom and pop operations. But, it will eventually get there. Of that I am sure.

Dale Buxton

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 3:08 AM Lawrence Wisniewski via groups.io <lwreno=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I recall reading a post from someone on this list who claimed that some kind of negotiations were underway.  That was the extent of what was said.  I haven't seen anything else reported in my web rambles, and considerable time has passed.  An update from this source would be appreciated.  I would assume that it might be difficult to find a buyer for a mainly white metal business these days.As I recall, the source of the negotiation comment mentioned something about converting the technology to printing.  I have no idea what that would entail.


-----Original Message-----
From: John Cytron <rgsjohnny@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 8, 2020 2:37 pm
Subject: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

Perhaps I  missed this, but with the retirement of Eric Bracher and closing of Rio Grande Models, is a anyone going to buy the business or is it even for sale? I would hate to see all that great work in the castings and kits suddenly disappear forever.

John


Keith Wiseman
 

Dale,

  Almost no one in the Model Railroad industry makes Lead free castings.  Most that do have crappy looking castings as the higher temp allows just do not flow correctly.  I could easily name 10-15 companies that still have a percentage of lead in the alloy as most of Us use the same alloy from the same metal company.   Mostly tin, but does have some lead in there. 

  On the subject of Rio Grande Models, I reached out, but never heard anything back from Eric.  Not really sure if I can take on any more, but would to keep it from vanishing. 

Keith 


Mark Lewis
 

Keith,

Thanks for that info and update! I can't imagine why Eric would not have, at least, made a courtesy reply to you...seems odd, from his end.

Mark Lewis
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.


kevin b
 

i would be interested in buying him out.
and i would not switch it over to 3d printiing.
Kevin.

I recall reading a post from someone on this list who claimed that some kind of negotiations were underway.  That was the extent of what was said.  I haven't seen anything else reported in my web rambles, and considerable time has passed.  An update from this source would be appreciated.  I would assume that it might be difficult to find a buyer for a mainly white metal business these days.As I recall, the source of the negotiation comment mentioned something about converting the technology to printing.  I have no idea what that would entail.


-----Original Message-----
From: John Cytron <rgsjohnny@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 8, 2020 2:37 pm
Subject: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

Perhaps I  missed this, but with the retirement of Eric Bracher and closing of Rio Grande Models, is a anyone going to buy the business or is it even for sale? I would hate to see all that great work in the castings and kits suddenly disappear forever.

John


Mark Lewis
 

Kevin,

That would be great, for the hobby, but....it is puzzling why Keith Wiseman never received a reply from Eric, when Keith made an inquiry to purchase Rio Grande Models.
I hope it's not because Eric doesn't want to sell the business.

Mark Lewis
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.


kevin b
 

well, i have been told Eric was well off money wise WITHOUT the model business.
it might be he just don't give a rip and has gone off doing other things.

i do not know the man, and i can't imagine why he would not want to sell it off if he's done messing with it.
who knows?

i take it nobody on here knows him personally?

for what it's worth, i've tried a number of times to contact Keystone Locomotive Works.
i'd be interested in buying them out also.
they won't return my calls or anything either.

thanks.
kevin.

Kevin,

That would be great, for the hobby, but....it is puzzling why Keith Wiseman never received a reply from Eric, when Keith made an inquiry to purchase Rio Grande Models.
I hope it's not because Eric doesn't want to sell the business.

Mark Lewis
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.


Climax@...
 

Mark Lewis, contact me privately. Dave  climax@...

-----Original Message-----
From: "kevin b via groups.io"
Sent: Aug 9, 2020 1:17 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

well, i have been told Eric was well off money wise WITHOUT the model business.
it might be he just don't give a rip and has gone off doing other things.

i do not know the man, and i can't imagine why he would not want to sell it off if he's done messing with it.
who knows?

i take it nobody on here knows him personally?

for what it's worth, i've tried a number of times to contact Keystone Locomotive Works.
i'd be interested in buying them out also.
they won't return my calls or anything either.

thanks.
kevin.

Kevin,

That would be great, for the hobby, but....it is puzzling why Keith Wiseman never received a reply from Eric, when Keith made an inquiry to purchase Rio Grande Models.
I hope it's not because Eric doesn't want to sell the business.

Mark Lewis
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.


Richard Johnson
 

Like Nevada California Oregan shops.  That used to produce SPng cars in urethane for O and S scales. 
I finally tracked down the current owner of them who has done nothing with them since he bought them from Bob Bader and  doesnt intend to becuase he things there is no markt for them and is not interested in selling the line....
Stupid IMHO so whatever...... people do things that make no sense....
Regards all
Rich Johnson

www.RichardSJohnson.net 

"Those who enjoy freedom must endeavor to preserve it."


"No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms"
Thomas Jefferson




From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of kevin b via groups.io <arcatruck13@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 9, 2020 10:17 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?
 
well, i have been told Eric was well off money wise WITHOUT the model business.
it might be he just don't give a rip and has gone off doing other things.

i do not know the man, and i can't imagine why he would not want to sell it off if he's done messing with it.
who knows?

i take it nobody on here knows him personally?

for what it's worth, i've tried a number of times to contact Keystone Locomotive Works.
i'd be interested in buying them out also.
they won't return my calls or anything either.

thanks.
kevin.

Kevin,

That would be great, for the hobby, but....it is puzzling why Keith Wiseman never received a reply from Eric, when Keith made an inquiry to purchase Rio Grande Models.
I hope it's not because Eric doesn't want to sell the business.

Mark Lewis
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.


Lawrence Wisniewski
 

Keith W.:      I've always appreciated your preservation of some of the older product lines that would have been lost to memory by now.  I especially applaud the many improvements that you have made in the old Scale Structures LTD vehicles to make them buildable.  I've built most of your hon3 items and really like to have them on my layout, primarily because they remind me of the struggles I went through to become good enough to tackle them now.  When I was young, those Gazette adds were both inspiring and tormenting at the same time.  They aren't call Craftsman kits for nothing.  When I found about about Eric B.'s sudden disappearance, I wondered whether you might try to take on the line if he were still mentally sound enough to consider passing on the torch.  Personally, I find the circumstances surrounding his departure very reminiscent of the Alzheimer's rabbit hole (or perhaps even lead poisoning.  Remember that one guys?).  Perhaps it's best that he is unresponsive;  his line had many kits that suffered significant quality control problems and trying to take on a population of problem children that large might just do you in given the current level of your commitments to the hobby.  We need all the old hands this hobby can muster.


-----Original Message-----
From: Keith Wiseman <kwiseman9961@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Sun, Aug 9, 2020 12:24 pm
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Rio Grande Models--is there a future?

Dale,

  Almost no one in the Model Railroad industry makes Lead free castings.  Most that do have crappy looking castings as the higher temp allows just do not flow correctly.  I could easily name 10-15 companies that still have a percentage of lead in the alloy as most of Us use the same alloy from the same metal company.   Mostly tin, but does have some lead in there. 

  On the subject of Rio Grande Models, I reached out, but never heard anything back from Eric.  Not really sure if I can take on any more, but would to keep it from vanishing. 

Keith 


Dale Buxton
 

Keith,

I didn't mean to imply that there was no lead in today's white metal hobby castings. But I do have something more than a passing knowledge on the subject. You see I used to work for a company in Aurora CO, Called Minifigs. They tried to resurrect the old Ral Partha Line and Partha also did contract casting (Mostly 25mm Napolianics). I was the only one of the employees with a pick-up truck So I would get picked to go down to the foundry to get our raw casting alloy. They put it in the bed of my truck with a forklift and it took four of us to muscle it out at the shop! I read the spec sheets they were required to give us with the invoice.  And yes there was Lead in there. Just a whole lot less than in the old days, There were also some other low melting point metals in there too. Problem is, most of those are toxic to varying degrees as well. Minifigs and the foundry in Denver where they got the metal are gone now. Musket Miniatures almost bit the dust. But they are back. Musket's casting quality is right up there with GHQ's. GHQ's HO scale vehicles are incredible! Musket makes some really nice HO scale American Civil War products. I really like their split rail fences.

It is odd that Eric did not reply to you.

Dale Buxton



On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 10:24 AM Keith Wiseman <kwiseman9961@...> wrote:
Dale,

  Almost no one in the Model Railroad industry makes Lead free castings.  Most that do have crappy looking castings as the higher temp allows just do not flow correctly.  I could easily name 10-15 companies that still have a percentage of lead in the alloy as most of Us use the same alloy from the same metal company.   Mostly tin, but does have some lead in there. 

  On the subject of Rio Grande Models, I reached out, but never heard anything back from Eric.  Not really sure if I can take on any more, but would to keep it from vanishing. 

Keith 


Keith Wiseman
 

Dale,

Most of the dangers with the Lead and other metals is the fumes created when molten. We Use and Have always used High flow ventilation over Our Melting pos and also in Our Resin casting areas.  When the pot is hot the fan is on and stays on until the metal is solid in the pot.  I own 5 companies that the future owners used no ventilation over their pots.  See a theme there. 

Keith