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PSC Short Caboose Kit Decal Set


Jim Marlett
 

Using Google Earth, I measure 111 yards from the main line and 156 yards from the depot. In other words, pretty close.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On May 27, 2020, at 8:41 AM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:

That car looks great.  How close is the SN Engine house to the D&SNG operations?  I haven't been up to Silverton in many years.  Also, are those Link & pin couplers on the 1005?  I can't really tell from the photo.

Thanks for the info.

Bill Lugg


On 5/27/20 5:51 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
The four wheel short caboose in Silverton wasn’t a C&S caboose. It was a former D&RG then Silverton Northern caboose. Here is a bit more about it.

https://www.silvertonnorthern.com/equipment-roster.html

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On May 26, 2020, at 10:49 PM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:

Since we're discussing short cabooses, there used to be a 4-wheel C&S(?) caboose in Silverton, CO on display across the creek (and the freeway) from the entrance to the Georgetown Loop.  The last time I was up that way as I recall it was gone - I believe the track section was still there.

Was I blind and just missed it on has it been move elsewhere?

Thanks
Bill Lugg









tonyk537
 

Thanks guys.  I wish I could say I researched exactly how the brake components were on those oddball high cabooses, but I just followed the PSC kit instructions for that part of it.

The steps are built up from strip styrene and brass rod. Turned out very strong as the brass rod pins them into the car body and platform sill.

Been pretty happy with this type of weathering over the last years.  Shoot the car a base color with gloss then decal and clear.  Then a fiberglass erasure to remove lettering.  For the variation in color, I brush paint individual boards with a half a dozen different reds, grays and tans.  Finish it off with a little more fiberglass eraser and a little wash.  Gives a nice variation of color and sheen.  A little "texture" as Dick Dorman used to call it.

Tony Kassin


bassb04011
 

Looks good Tony!
Brian


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of tonyk537 via groups.io <Tonyk375@...>
Sent: Monday, June 1, 2020 11:42 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] PSC Short Caboose Kit Decal Set
 
Thanks guys.  I wish I could say I researched exactly how the brake components were on those oddball high cabooses, but I just followed the PSC kit instructions for that part of it.

The steps are built up from strip styrene and brass rod. Turned out very strong as the brass rod pins them into the car body and platform sill.

Been pretty happy with this type of weathering over the last years.  Shoot the car a base color with gloss then decal and clear.  Then a fiberglass erasure to remove lettering.  For the variation in color, I brush paint individual boards with a half a dozen different reds, grays and tans.  Finish it off with a little more fiberglass eraser and a little wash.  Gives a nice variation of color and sheen.  A little "texture" as Dick Dorman used to call it.

Tony Kassin


Robert Bell
 

Thank you Tony.  That caboose looks awesome - really well done.  I have tried to research the brake rigging and. One up with nothing so I am going to follow the PSC instructions as well.  Was just curious what you had done, thanks.

Rob


John Stutz
 

Rob

The general rules of air brake rigging are fairly simple: The railroad air brake acts by applying pressure to the cylinder, pushing the piston out. The piston rod is hollow with a loose push rod inside, which allows the hand brake to work without moving the piston . Chains and long rods always act in tension, but inside hung brake beam levers are connected by a short stiff compression rod. The brake levers' pivot distances are proportioned to put equal force on all brake shoes. The 'floating lever', the one attached to the push rod and and hand brake rigging,and the 'fixed lever' with one end pivoted on the car frame, are proportioned so that the total force on brake shoes does not exceed about 70% of a car's light weight, when a standard service application gives the standard piston stroke. This is to avoid slid wheels caused by excessive shoe pressure, but does not affect us.

It does get a little more complicated when two hand brakes are provided, since each needs to work independently, and independently of the air brake, to avoid excessive brake shoe pressure. The 1906 Car Builder's Dictionary is online and has several drawings illustrating such rigging. Figures 1101 shows a passenger car arrangement previously recommended by Westinghouse, but this allows the hand brakes to combine with the air brake to give excess pressure on the wheels, Figure 1185 is a better one, where the two systems act independently. Essentially the hand brakes each act on the ends of a fixed center pivoted combination lever, the B side end of which is also chained to the flloating lever, where a single ended hand brake normally attaches.

The PSC short caboose kits attempt to model a minor variation of the latter design, but have an error in their execution. Lay out the foundation brake levers casting, as it appears in the under-body illustration. The handbrake combination lever (illustration's arrow 15) and the air brake floating lever are connected by chains at each end. The chain tieing the brake cylinder or B ends is correct. The chain at the opposite or A end is not. The A end chain should tie the combining lever to the car's A end hand brake rod. The floating lever A end should tie to the car's B end truck's brake levers, same as in the single hand brake freight car rigging. These floating and combination levers should NOT be in the same vertical plane at their A ends, since their connections each cross the other lever.

Essentially, all that has been added is the combination lever with its fixed center pivot, in order to employ double hand brake wheels. But note that you always need to release the applied wheel, to release the brakes, when braked by hand.

John Stutz

On June 3, 2020 at 5:47 AM "Robert Bell via groups.io" <ionhoss@...> wrote:

Thank you Tony.  That caboose looks awesome - really well done.  I have tried to research the brake rigging and. One up with nothing so I am going to follow the PSC instructions as well.  Was just curious what you had done, thanks.

Rob