NG Passenger Car Brake rigging


Don Bergman
 

Folks,

I am looking for photos, plan, diagrams for typical D&RG / RGS passenger Car brake rigging.

Don Bergman


Ted Wiese
 


Don,
Currently, I'm digitizing all my photos. I might find something of interest.
8,000 and counting - just starting on slides.
ted

On Wed, Apr 21, 2021 at 9:59 PM Don Bergman <DBRenegade@...> wrote:
Folks,

I am looking for photos, plan, diagrams for typical D&RG / RGS passenger Car brake rigging.

Don Bergman



--
Ted Wiese
San Juan Southern
Connecting the RGS to Red Mountain


Mike Conder
 

Check the photo in the Colorado RR Museum Annual on the F&CC.  The first passenger car into Victor crashed and spanned a gully on its side. And this wa a recorded with a photo that’s a full-on shot of the underside.  

Mike Conder

On Wed, Apr 21, 2021 at 7:59 PM Don Bergman <DBRenegade@...> wrote:
Folks,

I am looking for photos, plan, diagrams for typical D&RG / RGS passenger Car brake rigging.

Don Bergman

--
Mike Conder


Spike
 

Don,

See attached, for modeling use only. From the Wayne Lincoln Collection

Standard Car 1885 rebuild plans.

This is straight air.

Todd Leftwich


Randy Hees
 

Here is the brake rigging drawing used in the C&TS Historic car restoration report.   The D&RG had a somewhat unique foundation brake brake lever/rod system.  There were three discrete systems, each with two levers, all interconnected by chains.  One for the hand brakes, one for the air brakes and one connected to the trucks.

Randy Hees

On Wed, Apr 21, 2021 at 6:59 PM Don Bergman <DBRenegade@...> wrote:
Folks,

I am looking for photos, plan, diagrams for typical D&RG / RGS passenger Car brake rigging.

Don Bergman


Earl Knoob
 

Regarding the 1885 drawing...  There was no reason for the auxiliary reservoir shown on the drawing.  In 1885 straight air was used on passenger trains, which had no use for an auxiliary reservoir.  Rather odd.  Perhaps the drawing was updated much later to reflect the addition of automatic air brakes.

The drawing Randy posted shows the auxiliary reservoir utilized with automatic air brakes, which, of course, is utilized on the modern rebuild of the historic passenger car fleet.


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of Spike <redmountainspike@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 9:04 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] NG Passenger Car Brake rigging
 
Don,

See attached, for modeling use only. From the Wayne Lincoln Collection

Standard Car 1885 rebuild plans.

This is straight air.

Todd Leftwich


Randy Hees
 

The drawing I included seems to have been the standard brake system after the adoption of automatic brakes on the D&RG(W) passenger.  The surprise to me was the use of a "F" triple valve... this was the first Westinghouse automatic brake valve, replaced by the "H" triple c. 1885.  The "H" had "fast action" was needed to meet the specifications called for in the Burlington Air Brake trials.  Fast action would vent the brake pipe when an emergency application was made.  On SP, the old F triplets were called out as "slow action" on car record cards.  F triples were thought to be ok for up to 10 cars... the new H triple was good for 30 cars.   H triples were used on the big car orders or 1903...  In 1907 the H was superseded by the K triple.  K & H triples were very similar, and a H could be upgraded to a K.  I understand that the D&RG also used F triples on tenders.

Randy Hees... 

On Fri, Apr 23, 2021 at 10:47 AM Earl Knoob <earlk489@...> wrote:
Regarding the 1885 drawing...  There was no reason for the auxiliary reservoir shown on the drawing.  In 1885 straight air was used on passenger trains, which had no use for an auxiliary reservoir.  Rather odd.  Perhaps the drawing was updated much later to reflect the addition of automatic air brakes.

The drawing Randy posted shows the auxiliary reservoir utilized with automatic air brakes, which, of course, is utilized on the modern rebuild of the historic passenger car fleet.


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of Spike <redmountainspike@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 9:04 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] NG Passenger Car Brake rigging
 
Don,

See attached, for modeling use only. From the Wayne Lincoln Collection

Standard Car 1885 rebuild plans.

This is straight air.

Todd Leftwich


Earl Knoob
 

The D&RGW used F triple valves on narrow gauge passenger cars until around 1960, when they were changed to K triple valves.  By then, the only passenger cars were those used on the Silverton trains.  Any cars retired or converted to work train service before 1960 would still have F triple valves.  On the C&TS, the three RPO cars as well as 0452 and 292 all had F triple valves and it appears they have stayed with them.  I don't know what kind of valves are on the 256.  I believe the Pullman got a K triple valve.  I believe the cars at Knott's still have F triple valves.

A lot of the cars on the narrow gauge had H triples converted to K valves.  When bolted to the aux. reservoir, the only give-a-way to the valve being a K triple is a small fin on the top of the valve.  H triples don't have the fin.  When an H is converted to a K, a sheet metal fin is screwed on to the body.

the main difference between an H valve and a K valve is a K has a "retarded release and recharge" feature.  This makes the cars near the front of the train release and recharge slower than the cars on the rear of a 50+ car train.  As the cars on the head end get the air signal to release and recharge sooner than the cars on the rear, by retarding the release and recharge on the head end cars, all the cars in a long train did equal work.  Increasing the brake pipe pressure 3-5 lbs. put the triple valve into full release, 5 lbs. increase and above pushed the valve into retarded release and recharge.

In reality, we found that on a 20-car train, all the cars released in "retarded release" mode.


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of Randy Hees <randyhees@...>
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 7:47 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] NG Passenger Car Brake rigging
 
The drawing I included seems to have been the standard brake system after the adoption of automatic brakes on the D&RG(W) passenger.  The surprise to me was the use of a "F" triple valve... this was the first Westinghouse automatic brake valve, replaced by the "H" triple c. 1885.  The "H" had "fast action" was needed to meet the specifications called for in the Burlington Air Brake trials.  Fast action would vent the brake pipe when an emergency application was made.  On SP, the old F triplets were called out as "slow action" on car record cards.  F triples were thought to be ok for up to 10 cars... the new H triple was good for 30 cars.   H triples were used on the big car orders or 1903...  In 1907 the H was superseded by the K triple.  K & H triples were very similar, and a H could be upgraded to a K.  I understand that the D&RG also used F triples on tenders.

Randy Hees... 

On Fri, Apr 23, 2021 at 10:47 AM Earl Knoob <earlk489@...> wrote:
Regarding the 1885 drawing...  There was no reason for the auxiliary reservoir shown on the drawing.  In 1885 straight air was used on passenger trains, which had no use for an auxiliary reservoir.  Rather odd.  Perhaps the drawing was updated much later to reflect the addition of automatic air brakes.

The drawing Randy posted shows the auxiliary reservoir utilized with automatic air brakes, which, of course, is utilized on the modern rebuild of the historic passenger car fleet.


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of Spike <redmountainspike@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 9:04 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] NG Passenger Car Brake rigging
 
Don,

See attached, for modeling use only. From the Wayne Lincoln Collection

Standard Car 1885 rebuild plans.

This is straight air.

Todd Leftwich