Topics

Limited Run of the Shay Wood Miter now the Slicer

Darryl Huffman
 

Over the years, I have had several people ask about the Shay Wood Miter that I use in my videos.

Mine was custom made for me by my good friend Max Corey.

If you do not know what I am referring to, here is a link to a Youtube video I filmed years ago about how to make your own.





But you don't need to make your own as Max has 4 of them ready to ship right now.

These are only available in limited quantities.

These are hand crafted, custom made tools.

Max's new version is longer and stronger.

Price is $150

You can contact Max here:


Darryl Huffman
darrylhuffman@...

You can follow along on my build of the 1980 Tom Yorke HO Pool Hall / Bordello here:






Dale Buxton
 

I haven't seen a Shay Cutter since I was in my twenties. I always wanted one too. About 25 years ago or so, Division Point Models marketed a real nice all metal one that was about 2 feet long and a foot wide with an anodized aluminum bed that was marked in like one inch squares and had a scale rule attached up by the cutting face. They were like $250 to $500 dollars but really nicely made.

When I worked in the printing business, we used a machine called a "Guillotine Cutter" to cut paper and plastic. The essential parts are all identical to this "Shay Cutter". In industry, they are use for many types of sheet material cutting. When paper money is cut to final size it is cut on a guillotine cutter. Coors Container uses them for cutting thin sheet aluminum. The blades on theirs are about 12 to 18 feet long. The ones I used for paper and plastic cutting were 4 to 8 feet long.

The main differences between this tool and a guillotine cutter is that, 1. Your facing the blade and not parallel to it.

2. On the guillotine cutter, the blade edge only has a bevel on the backside of the blade (the part of the blade facing the operator). The front side is flat and flush with the cutting face. The reason for the single bevel edge is that a back to back beveled cutting edge causes a thing called back-lash to the work piece and will prevent a straight cut as part of the front of the blade pushes back at the work piece.

3. Where the blade comes down to contact the table at the end of the cut. There is a trough in the table parallel to the blade where a plastic stick is put. This is so the blade does not bottom out metal to metal and ruin the cutting edge.

4. The metering face (called the "Fence") pushes the work face towards you and the cutting face of the blade with a lead screw and a T-nut that goes in the slot in the table (just like this ones thumb screw). The lead screw is connected at the front of the machine to a hand crank or electric motor.

And, 5. There is a hydraulic or electro-mechanical clamp that comes down behind the blade face to hold the work piece in place while the blade powers through it. This so the work piece isn't dragged into the direction of the blade travel, which is usually to the left and skews the cut if the clamp is not holding the work piece firmly in place.

This cutter and the NWSL Chopper could really benefit from a picture framing, matte cutting blade. These blades cutting edge are identical to a guillotine cutter blades single bevel edge. This would insure squarer cuts and eliminate having two cut pieces with a beveled end the matches the double bevel of the single edge razor blade. This would make for less final sanding of the ends of work pieces.

The other thing it could use is a bit of self-healing cutting matte that inserts flush into the table where the blade contacts the cutting surface. The Chopper II had this feature. It really prolongs the life of the razor blade.

Thanks for the video Darryl.

Nice to see this great little tool again!

Dale Buxton 

On Sat, Jul 13, 2019 at 2:33 AM Darryl Huffman via Groups.Io <darrylhuffman=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Over the years, I have had several people ask about the Shay Wood Miter that I use in my videos.

Mine was custom made for me by my good friend Max Corey.

If you do not know what I am referring to, here is a link to a Youtube video I filmed years ago about how to make your own.





But you don't need to make your own as Max has 4 of them ready to ship right now.

These are only available in limited quantities.

These are hand crafted, custom made tools.

Max's new version is longer and stronger.

Price is $150

You can contact Max here:


Darryl Huffman

You can follow along on my build of the 1980 Tom Yorke HO Pool Hall / Bordello here:






Darryl Huffman
 

Dale,

 Great information.

The mat cutting blade sounds intersting.

I bought one of the NWSL Choppers and immediately flowed my wood with blood.

Pushing a piece of stripwood under that "shark mouth razor blade" was hard for me to do

I'm pretty clumsy and have to use " idiot proof" tools.

Thanks for the information.

Darryl Huffman


On Sunday, July 14, 2019, 3:14 AM, Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...> wrote:

I haven't seen a Shay Cutter since I was in my twenties. I always wanted one too. About 25 years ago or so, Division Point Models marketed a real nice all metal one that was about 2 feet long and a foot wide with an anodized aluminum bed that was marked in like one inch squares and had a scale rule attached up by the cutting face. They were like $250 to $500 dollars but really nicely made.

When I worked in the printing business, we used a machine called a "Guillotine Cutter" to cut paper and plastic. The essential parts are all identical to this "Shay Cutter". In industry, they are use for many types of sheet material cutting. When paper money is cut to final size it is cut on a guillotine cutter. Coors Container uses them for cutting thin sheet aluminum. The blades on theirs are about 12 to 18 feet long. The ones I used for paper and plastic cutting were 4 to 8 feet long.

The main differences between this tool and a guillotine cutter is that, 1. Your facing the blade and not parallel to it.

2. On the guillotine cutter, the blade edge only has a bevel on the backside of the blade (the part of the blade facing the operator). The front side is flat and flush with the cutting face. The reason for the single bevel edge is that a back to back beveled cutting edge causes a thing called back-lash to the work piece and will prevent a straight cut as part of the front of the blade pushes back at the work piece.

3. Where the blade comes down to contact the table at the end of the cut. There is a trough in the table parallel to the blade where a plastic stick is put. This is so the blade does not bottom out metal to metal and ruin the cutting edge.

4. The metering face (called the "Fence") pushes the work face towards you and the cutting face of the blade with a lead screw and a T-nut that goes in the slot in the table (just like this ones thumb screw). The lead screw is connected at the front of the machine to a hand crank or electric motor.

And, 5. There is a hydraulic or electro-mechanical clamp that comes down behind the blade face to hold the work piece in place while the blade powers through it. This so the work piece isn't dragged into the direction of the blade travel, which is usually to the left and skews the cut if the clamp is not holding the work piece firmly in place.

This cutter and the NWSL Chopper could really benefit from a picture framing, matte cutting blade. These blades cutting edge are identical to a guillotine cutter blades single bevel edge. This would insure squarer cuts and eliminate having two cut pieces with a beveled end the matches the double bevel of the single edge razor blade. This would make for less final sanding of the ends of work pieces.

The other thing it could use is a bit of self-healing cutting matte that inserts flush into the table where the blade contacts the cutting surface. The Chopper II had this feature. It really prolongs the life of the razor blade.

Thanks for the video Darryl.

Nice to see this great little tool again!

Dale Buxton 

On Sat, Jul 13, 2019 at 2:33 AM Darryl Huffman via Groups.Io <darrylhuffman=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Over the years, I have had several people ask about the Shay Wood Miter that I use in my videos.

Mine was custom made for me by my good friend Max Corey.

If you do not know what I am referring to, here is a link to a Youtube video I filmed years ago about how to make your own.





But you don't need to make your own as Max has 4 of them ready to ship right now.

These are only available in limited quantities.

These are hand crafted, custom made tools.

Max's new version is longer and stronger.

Price is $150

You can contact Max here:


Darryl Huffman

You can follow along on my build of the 1980 Tom Yorke HO Pool Hall / Bordello here: