Topics

Driveshat Tubing Re: coreless motors again


Craig Symington
 

Hi Craig Linn et al,

You only need a friction fit with the tubing.  Not too tight but not too loose.  Too tight and it looses it's flexibility at the joint and too loose and it slips on the shafts.  No glue.

It's also important that the shafts be the same or very close in size too.  I often have to shim one shaft or the other.  NWSL has the bushings and with luck sometimes those fishing crimps in the article will size right and work.  The fishing crimps aren't machine perfect so it might take a couple orders to find the right ones.  Eldon Shirey used to sell metal surgical tubing at one time for shims too.  I'm not sure where he got it but it might be found on the net somewhere.

I bought a bunch of different sizes of rubber tubing before I figured out what I needed.  If you read the green tape in the pictures in the article it shows the sizes that I found work with 1.5mm, 2.0mm and 2.4mm shafts.  They sell in on ebay in meter lengths.

Another really neat trick I've tried based on seeing someone else do it, is creating a driveshaft out of tubing.  If you have a long gap between the motor and gear box (for example 1 inch) you can use an 1.5" piece of tubing with a .9 inch length of shaft material in the middle to stiffen the tubing.  It basically creates a driveshaft with two universal joints.  Surprisingly, this works quite well.

On another subject.  I've written a lot of articles over the years.  I just write about what I'm currently working on and share techniques that I think other people might be interested in.  I never know if people actually read the articles or are even interested in the content.  It's always flattering to find that people actually read what I've written.  But on that subject....I'm working on a few brass bashing articles right now.  With the insane prices and growing scarcity of blackstone equipment it seems that this hobby might be coming full circle back to where we have to rework older brass.  I do a lot of this work in HOn3 and HO.  I don't profess to be an expert at it, but I've learned a lot and can come out with some decent results.  If you have any ideas for articles on any subject or questions about brass bashing please drop me a personal note at craig at rio grande southern dot com.  I can't guarantee it will fit into my plans but I do appreciate the input.

Cheers!

Craig Symington.


Dale Buxton
 

Hey Craig,

You used to have a calculator on you web page that would calculate the max speed of your locomotive based on the micro motors gear head ratio to gear box ratio to driver diameter. I found that tool very useful. Where did you get it? Do you still have access to it? I could sure use it again.

Thank you

Dale Buxton

On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 7:38 AM Craig Symington <craig@...> wrote:
Hi Craig Linn et al,

You only need a friction fit with the tubing.  Not too tight but not too loose.  Too tight and it looses it's flexibility at the joint and too loose and it slips on the shafts.  No glue.

It's also important that the shafts be the same or very close in size too.  I often have to shim one shaft or the other.  NWSL has the bushings and with luck sometimes those fishing crimps in the article will size right and work.  The fishing crimps aren't machine perfect so it might take a couple orders to find the right ones.  Eldon Shirey used to sell metal surgical tubing at one time for shims too.  I'm not sure where he got it but it might be found on the net somewhere.

I bought a bunch of different sizes of rubber tubing before I figured out what I needed.  If you read the green tape in the pictures in the article it shows the sizes that I found work with 1.5mm, 2.0mm and 2.4mm shafts.  They sell in on ebay in meter lengths.

Another really neat trick I've tried based on seeing someone else do it, is creating a driveshaft out of tubing.  If you have a long gap between the motor and gear box (for example 1 inch) you can use an 1.5" piece of tubing with a .9 inch length of shaft material in the middle to stiffen the tubing.  It basically creates a driveshaft with two universal joints.  Surprisingly, this works quite well.

On another subject.  I've written a lot of articles over the years.  I just write about what I'm currently working on and share techniques that I think other people might be interested in.  I never know if people actually read the articles or are even interested in the content.  It's always flattering to find that people actually read what I've written.  But on that subject....I'm working on a few brass bashing articles right now.  With the insane prices and growing scarcity of blackstone equipment it seems that this hobby might be coming full circle back to where we have to rework older brass.  I do a lot of this work in HOn3 and HO.  I don't profess to be an expert at it, but I've learned a lot and can come out with some decent results.  If you have any ideas for articles on any subject or questions about brass bashing please drop me a personal note at craig at rio grande southern dot com.  I can't guarantee it will fit into my plans but I do appreciate the input.

Cheers!

Craig Symington.