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decoder hook up wire

Robert Veefkind
 


Good day fellow modelers

I've been using left over wire from the Tsunami decoders to complete the wiring of sound decoders and adding firebox leds to simulate the flickering fire. Hooking up 3 volt leds with the leftover wire is a pain in the neck with heavy # 22 over insulated wire. I would like 12 volt wire that will take a bend and not spring back. NWSL had some but it was hard stripping. Any ideas ?

Russ Norris
 

I have been using high flex wire (36 AWG) from LokSound. It handles 14 volts without a problem, is easy to thread through tight spots and comes in a wide variety of colors.  Check out www.esu.eu.  Look for Accessories (Zubehor auf Deutsch).


On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 1:59 PM Robert Veefkind via Groups.Io <snookdust=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Good day fellow modelers

I've been using left over wire from the Tsunami decoders to complete the wiring of sound decoders and adding firebox leds to simulate the flickering fire. Hooking up 3 volt leds with the leftover wire is a pain in the neck with heavy # 22 over insulated wire. I would like 12 volt wire that will take a bend and not spring back. NWSL had some but it was hard stripping. Any ideas ?


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

lloyd lehrer
 

TCS sells wire;


lloyd lehrer, MANHATTAN BEACH, CA (310)951-9097


On Wed, Nov 13, 2019 at 10:59 AM Robert Veefkind via Groups.Io <snookdust=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Good day fellow modelers

I've been using left over wire from the Tsunami decoders to complete the wiring of sound decoders and adding firebox leds to simulate the flickering fire. Hooking up 3 volt leds with the leftover wire is a pain in the neck with heavy # 22 over insulated wire. I would like 12 volt wire that will take a bend and not spring back. NWSL had some but it was hard stripping. Any ideas ?


--
lloyd lehrer

Alan Kilby
 

Digitrax also sells it in a package with the different color coded wire for decoders in one package.Convenient not having to buy different colors separately and having them all.
Alan

Mark Kasprowicz
 

I use all black, that way it doesn't show. But I identify each wire by dipping the end into cheqp quick drying paint. The 99c pots from Walfphart are ideal.

Mark K
Oxon England.

LARRY KLOSE
 

Soundtraxx and other decoder manufacturers sell decoder wire—usually 32-33 gauge, depending on the provider.  #22 might be good for  F or G scale 45mm gauge trains.  A good retail electronics seller would have small gauge, too.  Check the Soundtraxx or TCS web sites for recommended wire gauges.  NCE is another provider that sells it.  I got multiple colors of NCE at a local hobby shop in Roseville CA when I visited some time ago. Each color in a separate package, there’s enough to do many locos in each package.

 

Larry

Stephen Silver
 

I bought a box of 6 rolls (I think there is 30ft per roll) of 32g 6 different colors on amazon, works great and it was inexpensive.

S

Life is mostly attitude and timing


On Wednesday, November 13, 2019, 04:55:55 PM PST, LARRY KLOSE <lklose@...> wrote:


Soundtraxx and other decoder manufacturers sell decoder wire—usually 32-33 gauge, depending on the provider.  #22 might be good for  F or G scale 45mm gauge trains.  A good retail electronics seller would have small gauge, too.  Check the Soundtraxx or TCS web sites for recommended wire gauges.  NCE is another provider that sells it.  I got multiple colors of NCE at a local hobby shop in Roseville CA when I visited some time ago. Each color in a separate package, there’s enough to do many locos in each package.

 

Larry

Bob Burgoyne
 

Here's an idea:
Check your junk box for an old fashioned corded "Mouse". Clip the cord and strip the sheathing. Surprising flexibility and quality. Some have found retired "Mouses" at second hand stores.

Boomer Bob

Mark Rosche
 

love that tip...just picked up a box of old “mice” (35 in total) on ebay for $2 w/free shipping 👍🏻

Regards,

Mark

Don‘t take life too seriously...no one gets out alive anyway....

Brian Kopp
 

Robert maybe I am misunderstanding what you wanted but you said "take a bend and not spring back". That to me suggests solid wire. I and others use magnet wire for connecting LEDs. It is usually solid and comes in very small gauge. The coating comes off with sand paper or a hot air rework station. Some like to use a super hot iron to remove the coating but I am not a fan of that approach. With the magnet wire you can conform it to the inside of a shell and even tack it with a drop of caulk if you need too.

Using solid wire is ok within the loco or tender shell but don't run it between the loco and tender. Use the super flex wire others have mentioned for going between the loco and tender. The reason for this is the motion will fatigue and break most solid wire over time. And the break is hard to detect and will often cause intermittent operation.

Here is a cheap commercial source for 30 gauge magnet wire but ebay also sells it:
https://www.jameco.com/z/30MAG-75-30-AWG-Plain-Enamel-Magnet-Wire-75-Feet_2189863.html

I have also used magnet wire down to 36 gauge. It is great for working in headlights.....

There are some Youtube videos for doing SMD LEDs with magnet wire...........

--
Brian Kopp
Jacksonville, FL

Brian Kopp
 

I forgot to mention that butt splicing wires together can give some folks consternation, and magnet wire to stranded wire is an example butt splice you might need with a DCC loco and tender. With some real railroad comms and signals in my background, I am a fan of the lineman splice, also known as the Western Union splice. It is a strong butt splice that is small in diameter (3 wire diameters). Google it and you will see it is easy to do. If you add a drop of solder  you can easily get away with about 2 wraps per side. Heat shrink the splice or coat with liquid electrical tape and you have a very small splice. For a harness with parallel splices, if you have the room, stagger the splices just enough so that all the splices are not together creating a harness that has one big bulge. It will be easier to feed the harness through tight spaces.

--
Brian Kopp
Jacksonville, FL

Robert Veefkind
 



In a message dated 11/14/2019 7:12:10 AM Eastern Standard Time, kc5lpa1@... writes:

Robert maybe I am misunderstanding what you wanted but you said "take a bend and not spring back". That to me suggests solid wire
thanks all for the helpful replies. I think in my case solid wire would be the best. But at one time I had # 30 stranded that kept a bend and would stay put while a dab of black plastic insulation dried to keep it in place      Bob V.