Topics

D&RGW Reefers

Wes Garcia
 

I am looking for some input. I am planning to use Badger Model-flex paint 16-62 D&RGW yellow. Would this be a good match for the 30' reefer? I will be using roof brown for the ends and roof. Thank you in advance for your feedback. 


Wes

Art D3
 

D&RGW yellow will work if you want a little darker yellow. Blackstone's reefers are standard reefer yellow which is probably accurate, but a little on the light side for my taste.

Also, you're using roof brown on the ends and roof and not box car red?
--
Art Dutra
Meriden, CT

Wes Garcia
 

Hi Art;

 

Did not know that it should be boxcar red. I will go order some box car red. I think I will go with the Model-flex. Thanks for the information.

 

Wes

 

From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> On Behalf Of Art D3
Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2019 11:27 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] D&RGW Reefers

 

D&RGW yellow will work if you want a little darker yellow. Blackstone's reefers are standard reefer yellow which is probably accurate, but a little on the light side for my taste.

Also, you're using roof brown on the ends and roof and not box car red?

--
Art Dutra
Meriden, CT

Mark Kasprowicz
 

Art,

The yellow that Blackstone used was based on paint chips from D&RGW Reefers 39 and 54. 39 and 54 were two sides of a storage unit so that each car had one side exposed to the elements and the other totally protected by an overall roof. They'd stood like that for years until the DRHS bought them. We restoed one (39) which is now at Silverton while the other is being used for storage. We gave Blackstone the opportunity to take paint samples from both which is what they based their paint on. But mountain UV can play havoc with tints. Be that as it may Sloan has a slightly different take on it all and it's worth refering to him though it asks more questions than it answers. That said an orange (with a hint of yellow) sided car with tuscan frames and box car red ends and roof could look neat.
And I agree that the roof and ends are standard box car red.

Mark K
Oxon England.

Art D3
 

Thanks Mark. I recalled the story about the reefers being restored, but the details were fuzzy enough that I didn't want to go into detail. I would also say that the yellow not only oxidized in the sun, but road dirt and grim had a big impact on the appearance of such a light color quickly.

Similarly, I remember reading somewhere, but can't recall where or who mentioned it that when 268 was given her bumblebee paint scheme for the World's Fair the yellow was described by a D&RGW employee as being painted "school bus" yellow. It would be interesting to find a paint formula for 1940-50 school bus yellow and see if that is indeed what was used.

Railroads tended to be frugal and very standardized. If your entire fleet of box cars, flat cars, and gondolas are paint box car red, why would you have to stock a different color for the ends and roofs of your reefers? Most color variation is due to the manual mixing capabilities of the era, perhaps different (and cheaper) paint suppliers,  sun fading, and dirt.

I have also been curious as to how the D&RGW selected the MOW gray paint. Could it have been a manufacturer's surplus lot? It certainly looks like a naval color, could it have been that the railroad found a large quantity of light gray paint from a supplier or military surplus at a very good price? Being that it was intended for non-revenue equipment I can't imagine that the company "bean counters" would have wanted to pay a lot for that paint.
--
Art Dutra
Meriden, CT