Topics

Adjusting grab irons

Dusty
 

I acquired this partially assembled car in a batch of Ebay stuff. I'm a .010 or .080 grab iron guy. The holes which had been drilled were huge and located rather randomly with regard to the locating dimples. First I drilled the holes straight.
 I sized them based on the largest and most crooked existing hole. I filled them with Grandt styrene rod. This stuff is different than Evergreen rod. Its texture is course and hard. And red. Next time I'll use Evergreen. I 'punched' the location to be drilled with a needle in a pin vise. It's much easier to locate the holes on a 'virgin' casting. My paired holes were not located very well vertically. After the grabs were ACC'd I adjusted them up or down at the ends slightly. Not perfect but better. Before and after images.

Dusty Burman 






Climax@...
 

That's why I still use the same grab iron drilling template that I made back in the 60's as it accurately places the drill where its needed every time.  I have two for HO and three fro HOn3.
DB

-----Original Message-----
From: Dusty
Sent: Sep 17, 2019 12:34 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] Adjusting grab irons

I acquired this partially assembled car in a batch of Ebay stuff. I'm a .010 or .080 grab iron guy. The holes which had been drilled were huge and located rather randomly with regard to the locating dimples. First I drilled the holes straight.
 I sized them based on the largest and most crooked existing hole. I filled them with Grandt styrene rod. This stuff is different than Evergreen rod. Its texture is course and hard. And red. Next time I'll use Evergreen. I 'punched' the location to be drilled with a needle in a pin vise. It's much easier to locate the holes on a 'virgin' casting. My paired holes were not located very well vertically. After the grabs were ACC'd I adjusted them up or down at the ends slightly. Not perfect but better. Before and after images.

Dusty Burman 






Mark Lewis
 

Dusty:

Pretty good save on a really buggered start. 

Mark Lewis 
narrow gauge modeling in N.C.

On Tue, Sep 17, 2019, 1:19 PM <Climax@...> wrote:
That's why I still use the same grab iron drilling template that I made back in the 60's as it accurately places the drill where its needed every time.  I have two for HO and three fro HOn3.
DB

-----Original Message-----
From: Dusty
Sent: Sep 17, 2019 12:34 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] Adjusting grab irons

I acquired this partially assembled car in a batch of Ebay stuff. I'm a .010 or .080 grab iron guy. The holes which had been drilled were huge and located rather randomly with regard to the locating dimples. First I drilled the holes straight.
 I sized them based on the largest and most crooked existing hole. I filled them with Grandt styrene rod. This stuff is different than Evergreen rod. Its texture is course and hard. And red. Next time I'll use Evergreen. I 'punched' the location to be drilled with a needle in a pin vise. It's much easier to locate the holes on a 'virgin' casting. My paired holes were not located very well vertically. After the grabs were ACC'd I adjusted them up or down at the ends slightly. Not perfect but better. Before and after images.

Dusty Burman 






Russ Norris
 

That's some improvement, Dusty.  Nice work.


On Tue, Sep 17, 2019, 12:34 PM Dusty <dustburm@q.com> wrote:
I acquired this partially assembled car in a batch of Ebay stuff. I'm a .010 or .080 grab iron guy. The holes which had been drilled were huge and located rather randomly with regard to the locating dimples. First I drilled the holes straight.
 I sized them based on the largest and most crooked existing hole. I filled them with Grandt styrene rod. This stuff is different than Evergreen rod. Its texture is course and hard. And red. Next time I'll use Evergreen. I 'punched' the location to be drilled with a needle in a pin vise. It's much easier to locate the holes on a 'virgin' casting. My paired holes were not located very well vertically. After the grabs were ACC'd I adjusted them up or down at the ends slightly. Not perfect but better. Before and after images.

Dusty Burman 







--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Steve Hatch
 

Pretty good save I agree.
   I usually use green putty myself.
  It's not easy to drill alongside an existing hole.

Steve Hatch

Dusty
 

Template - My 3000 series box cars are Railline with dimples. Perfect location, easy to drill.This car with the dimples destroyed is an exception. I don't think it's worth a template for a couple of 'saves'. My 4000 series scratch builds are an entirely different storey.

Putty - I'm not worth a crap when I try putty. I wasn't any good with it on my AMT Mercury Comet and its cast 'custom' front end. My filler putty application techniques haven't improved significantly since 1962. Embarrassing, yes.

This body goes on a 'stealth' dragger car and is sort of an experiment. Being financially 'tighter than a bulls a$$ at fly time' I refused to use a 'good' kit.

Making the pad as narrow as possible will allow me to install the outside truss rods. My personal vision is that the truss rods will obscure the dragger if you squint. I should have left the grabs crooked to draw attention from the dragger?

Dusty Burman 

Russ Norris
 

Dusty, I bought an HOn3 track cleaner car at the national convention.  It's solid brass with a roller soaked with cleaner.  And at $75 I wish I had seen your design first -- simple, clean and relatively cheap.  Great idea!


On Tue, Sep 17, 2019, 6:58 PM Dusty <dustburm@q.com> wrote:
Template - My 3000 series box cars are Railline with dimples. Perfect location, easy to drill.This car with the dimples destroyed is an exception. I don't think it's worth a template for a couple of 'saves'. My 4000 series scratch builds are an entirely different storey.

Putty - I'm not worth a crap when I try putty. I wasn't any good with it on my AMT Mercury Comet and its cast 'custom' front end. My filler putty application techniques haven't improved significantly since 1962. Embarrassing, yes.

This body goes on a 'stealth' dragger car and is sort of an experiment. Being financially 'tighter than a bulls a$$ at fly time' I refused to use a 'good' kit.

Making the pad as narrow as possible will allow me to install the outside truss rods. My personal vision is that the truss rods will obscure the dragger if you squint. I should have left the grabs crooked to draw attention from the dragger?

Dusty Burman 


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Climax@...
 

I always found that the green putty was a little soft for drilling so after it dried I applied a touch of super glue and it hardened up real good, almost too hard to drill!

-----Original Message-----
From: Dusty
Sent: Sep 17, 2019 6:58 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Adjusting grab irons

Template - My 3000 series box cars are Railline with dimples. Perfect location, easy to drill.This car with the dimples destroyed is an exception. I don't think it's worth a template for a couple of 'saves'. My 4000 series scratch builds are an entirely different storey.

Putty - I'm not worth a crap when I try putty. I wasn't any good with it on my AMT Mercury Comet and its cast 'custom' front end. My filler putty application techniques haven't improved significantly since 1962. Embarrassing, yes.

This body goes on a 'stealth' dragger car and is sort of an experiment. Being financially 'tighter than a bulls a$$ at fly time' I refused to use a 'good' kit.

Making the pad as narrow as possible will allow me to install the outside truss rods. My personal vision is that the truss rods will obscure the dragger if you squint. I should have left the grabs crooked to draw attention from the dragger?

Dusty Burman 

Mike Van Hove
 

I too, have a hard time using Squadron Putty.  I let it dry several days, still doesn’t smooth out as nice as I’d like.

Anyone have some good hints for using?
We might all get some good out of a little “Clinic”.
Thanks in advance,

Mike Van Hove
Columbia, MO

On Sep 17, 2019, at 5:58 PM, Dusty <dustburm@q.com> wrote:

Template - My 3000 series box cars are Railline with dimples. Perfect location, easy to drill.This car with the dimples destroyed is an exception. I don't think it's worth a template for a couple of 'saves'. My 4000 series scratch builds are an entirely different storey.

Putty - I'm not worth a crap when I try putty. I wasn't any good with it on my AMT Mercury Comet and its cast 'custom' front end. My filler putty application techniques haven't improved significantly since 1962. Embarrassing, yes.

This body goes on a 'stealth' dragger car and is sort of an experiment. Being financially 'tighter than a bulls a$$ at fly time' I refused to use a 'good' kit.

Making the pad as narrow as possible will allow me to install the outside truss rods. My personal vision is that the truss rods will obscure the dragger if you squint. I should have left the grabs crooked to draw attention from the dragger?

Dusty Burman 


Mike Conder
 

I used it a LOT in my youth building plastic model planes. I got it super smooth with medium then fine grit sandpaper (the black stuff) and ended with wet sanding using 400 grit wet/dry.

I got it as smooth as the injected plastic, fairly easy.

Mike Conder


Bill Lugg
 

Reproduce a naked lady on the sides of it like those old paintings that hung over the bar in saloons in the 1800s and no one will notice the slider.

Bill Lugg

On 9/17/19 4:58 PM, Dusty wrote:
Template - My 3000 series box cars are Railline with dimples. Perfect location, easy to drill.This car with the dimples destroyed is an exception. I don't think it's worth a template for a couple of 'saves'. My 4000 series scratch builds are an entirely different storey.

Putty - I'm not worth a crap when I try putty. I wasn't any good with it on my AMT Mercury Comet and its cast 'custom' front end. My filler putty application techniques haven't improved significantly since 1962. Embarrassing, yes.

This body goes on a 'stealth' dragger car and is sort of an experiment. Being financially 'tighter than a bulls a$$ at fly time' I refused to use a 'good' kit.

Making the pad as narrow as possible will allow me to install the outside truss rods. My personal vision is that the truss rods will obscure the dragger if you squint. I should have left the grabs crooked to draw attention from the dragger?

Dusty Burman

Mike Van Hove
 

Thanks, Mike.
I have used it primarily on Plastic model airplanes, myself.  Have been building as many of the WWII Fighters and bombers as I can find kits for.  All in 1/48.  Sure takes up a lot of room, especially as we have moved into a retirement village, and are in a much smaller house.  No stairs, tho, and that’s a big plus.

Maybe my mistake was not doing the wet sanding part.

I have tried the green stuff and the white.

Anyone have a preference, and why?

Thanks,
Mike Van Hove

On Sep 17, 2019, at 10:10 PM, Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:

I used it a LOT in my youth building plastic model planes. I got it super smooth with medium then fine grit sandpaper (the black stuff) and ended with wet sanding using 400 grit wet/dry.

I got it as smooth as the injected plastic, fairly easy.

Mike Conder



Mike Conder
 

I started with Squadron Green, never worried about the white.

But when I was really pinching pennies on high school and college, I bought spot putty from automotive discount stores like Checker Auto.  Worked just as well as Green but less than 1:4 the price and MUCH more available in a small Arizona town.

Mike Conder.



On Tue, Sep 17, 2019 at 9:41 PM Mike Van Hove <vanhovem22@...> wrote:
Thanks, Mike.
I have used it primarily on Plastic model airplanes, myself.  Have been building as many of the WWII Fighters and bombers as I can find kits for.  All in 1/48.  Sure takes up a lot of room, especially as we have moved into a retirement village, and are in a much smaller house.  No stairs, tho, and that’s a big plus.

Maybe my mistake was not doing the wet sanding part.

I have tried the green stuff and the white.

Anyone have a preference, and why?

Thanks,
Mike Van Hove


On Sep 17, 2019, at 10:10 PM, Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:

I used it a LOT in my youth building plastic model planes. I got it super smooth with medium then fine grit sandpaper (the black stuff) and ended with wet sanding using 400 grit wet/dry.

I got it as smooth as the injected plastic, fairly easy.

Mike Conder



Mike Settle
 

I build a little bit of everything, cars, airplanes, armor, ships, and trains. I also like the automotive spot putty, but for a very fine finish Tamiya white putty works great, but it shrinks a bit and may need more than one coat. I also wet sand, but I sometimes go up to 600 or 800 grit. If I need to fill holes, I'll glue stretched sprue or round rod in the hole and sand off smooth when dry. I have also melted scrap sprue in liquid Testors cement to make a plastic putty. It will bond to the plastic just like gluing pieces together. The only drawback is it can sometimes take days to completely dry before sanding. I've used super glue as a filler, too, but In my experience it is a pain in the keester. I have trouble getting a smooth edge with it. I have also found I get a better paint job if I prime a puttied area. Priming helps seal the surface and also shows flaws in the patch job.

Whatever method you use, have fun.

Mike Settle

tankcreek
 

While on the topic of grab iron installation, I've noticed that some ready-to-run models feature grab irons that appear to extend a bit too far out from the sides of the car, giving a nice model a sort of porcupine look.  To check this out, I measured the stand-off or the gap between the grab irons and the siding on the car on D&RGW box cars and stock cars in Chama and Durango and found the distance to be 2.5 inches.  The 1919 Car Builders Dictionary notes that the Interstate Commerce Commission also set that as the minimum distance as well.  That comes close to being .029 inches in HO.  I model in O scale making the distance on a model about .050 inches.  I have a piece of .050 styrene that is narrow enough and long enough to slip underneath all the grab irons on a car end, then press them down against it to set them all to the correct stand off before removing it and applying ACC.  

Grab iron material on the D&RGW cars were 5/8" in diameter or .625" which comes to about .007" in HO.

Dick Patton

bassb04011
 

I like miliput (fine). You have to Mix the two parts but so easy to work with.
Brian 


On Sep 18, 2019, at 12:42 PM, tankcreek via Groups.Io <dpattonredmesa@...> wrote:

While on the topic of grab iron installation, I've noticed that some ready-to-run models feature grab irons that appear to extend a bit too far out from the sides of the car, giving a nice model a sort of porcupine look.  To check this out, I measured the stand-off or the gap between the grab irons and the siding on the car on D&RGW box cars and stock cars in Chama and Durango and found the distance to be 2.5 inches.  The 1919 Car Builders Dictionary notes that the Interstate Commerce Commission also set that as the minimum distance as well.  That comes close to being .029 inches in HO.  I model in O scale making the distance on a model about .050 inches.  I have a piece of .050 styrene that is narrow enough and long enough to slip underneath all the grab irons on a car end, then press them down against it to set them all to the correct stand off before removing it and applying ACC.  

Grab iron material on the D&RGW cars were 5/8" in diameter or .625" which comes to about .007" in HO.

Dick Patton