Art Supply Store Visit


Dusty
 

During an unsupervised visit to Arizona Art Supply these items caught my fancy.



I was looking for 'stuff' to make Evergreen Corrugated look correctly metal. Does anyone have experience with the water soluble graphic stick. It looks like it might add that hint of metalic washed very lightly over Corrugated Styrene colored grey with a trace of silver. The gunmetal water color pencil doesn't appear to have any metalic reflection in it. Am I headed in the right direction? Any thoughts?

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Ric Case
 

Dusty: what age are you going for?
How old would the roof actually be?
Normal aging starts the first day in the sun! 
Old corrugated iron would start turning dull gray!
This would wind up rusting along the edges and any nail holes. 
Age of the structure and locale will determine what color you will be working to!
New building semi shiny! 
Older, many shades of grey and rust.
Just my views over the last 5 decades! 
Most of my structures have been on the railroad for many years! 
I model the EBT in 1947.
Not many buildings around the railroad were very new! 
So I color the roofs to represent decades of exposure!
Your building your choice.

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Jan 24, 2021, at 2:54 PM, Dusty <dustburm@q.com> wrote:

During an unsupervised visit to Arizona Art Supply these items caught my fancy.

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I was looking for 'stuff' to make Evergreen Corrugated look correctly metal. Does anyone have experience with the water soluble graphic stick. It looks like it might add that hint of metalic washed very lightly over Corrugated Styrene colored grey with a trace of silver. The gunmetal water color pencil doesn't appear to have any metalic reflection in it. Am I headed in the right direction? Any thoughts?

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Dusty
 

Ric,

My time is 1939 or 40ish. So I would have some very old structures and some not so old buildings.  Growing up in the rural midwest I noticed that roofs looked more aged than walls. I also noticed some Corrugated buildings were painted. I feel that I need to understand how to do a range of effects from late 1800s to 1920s. And perhaps newer. I guess I need to learn some techniques and test them out. I'm comfortable with horizontal seams but representing the vertical seams in Styrene Corrugated is yet to be perfected. Any help will be appreciated.

Dusty Burman


Dale Buxton
 

Dusty,

I am familiar with Golden Iridescent paints. They have finely ground up Mika in them. The Mika acts like micro sized prisms. They make the surface of the paint look sparkly, but in all the colors of the rainbow. If that is what  you are looking for then you have found the right stuff.

Dale Buxton

On Sun, Jan 24, 2021 at 12:54 Dusty <Dustburm@q.com> wrote:
During an unsupervised visit to Arizona Art Supply these items caught my fancy.



I was looking for 'stuff' to make Evergreen Corrugated look correctly metal. Does anyone have experience with the water soluble graphic stick. It looks like it might add that hint of metalic washed very lightly over Corrugated Styrene colored grey with a trace of silver. The gunmetal water color pencil doesn't appear to have any metalic reflection in it. Am I headed in the right direction? Any thoughts?

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Jim Marlett
 

I agree.Galvanized metal I’ve seen loses that metallic sheen pretty quickly. Personally, I wouldn’t bother, but every eye is different. As for the water soluble graphic (did you mean graphite?) stick, give it a try. If you don’t like it, wash it off or paint over it. You may be on the cutting edge of a new technique. If you are talking about graphite, I would think it will just be black, but it would be interesting to know for sure. Powdered graphite does have a sheen to it, but it is way too dark IMHO.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/

On Jan 24, 2021, at 2:32 PM, Ric Case <ebtmodeler@gmail.com> wrote:

Dusty: what age are you going for?
How old would the roof actually be?
Normal aging starts the first day in the sun!
Old corrugated iron would start turning dull gray!
This would wind up rusting along the edges and any nail holes.
Age of the structure and locale will determine what color you will be working to!
New building semi shiny!
Older, many shades of grey and rust.
Just my views over the last 5 decades!
Most of my structures have been on the railroad for many years!
I model the EBT in 1947.
Not many buildings around the railroad were very new!
So I color the roofs to represent decades of exposure!
Your building your choice.

Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694


Climax@...
 

put a small coating of slow drying white glue, then sprinkle complete coverage with graphite, then after it dries good, take a Q tip and rub it to bring up the polish.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Marlett <jmarlett@cox.net>
Sent: Jan 24, 2021 5:38 PM
To: HOn3 Group <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Art Supply Store Visit

I agree.Galvanized metal I’ve seen loses that metallic sheen pretty quickly. Personally, I wouldn’t bother, but every eye is different. As for the water soluble graphic (did you mean graphite?) stick, give it a try. If you don’t like it, wash it off or paint over it. You may be on the cutting edge of a new technique. If you are talking about graphite, I would think it will just be black, but it would be interesting to know for sure. Powdered graphite does have a sheen to it, but it is way too dark IMHO.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Jan 24, 2021, at 2:32 PM, Ric Case <ebtmodeler@gmail.com> wrote:

Dusty: what age are you going for?
How old would the roof actually be?
Normal aging starts the first day in the sun!
Old corrugated iron would start turning dull gray!
This would wind up rusting along the edges and any nail holes.
Age of the structure and locale will determine what color you will be working to!
New building semi shiny!
Older, many shades of grey and rust.
Just my views over the last 5 decades!
Most of my structures have been on the railroad for many years!
I model the EBT in 1947.
Not many buildings around the railroad were very new!
So I color the roofs to represent decades of exposure!
Your building your choice.

Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694





John Stutz
 

Jim & Dusty

I have used graphite on raw basswood to get a driftwood effect suitable for aged standing wood.  This is just a light application from the side of a graphite pencil, smeared none too uniformly with an artist's rolled paper stumpf.  Key is to keep the initial application light.  The result on such white wood is a light and slightly iridescent gray, characteristic of raw wood that has stood in moderately wet weather for a few decades. 

Jim Vail once suggested lightly weathering wood sheathed cars by a applying a sharp wedge pointed graphite pencil to the grooves between boards where the paint first breaks down.  I have fond this quite effective. 

In both cases i have used ordinary artist's or drafting pencils, of the sort specifically made of graphite.  I have not yet tried either graphite sticks, or water soluble graphite pencils, both of which are available in a variety of tints.

John Stutz

On January 24, 2021 2:38 PM Jim Marlett < jmarlett@...> wrote:


I agree.Galvanized metal I’ve seen loses that metallic sheen pretty quickly. Personally, I wouldn’t bother, but every eye is different. As for the water soluble graphic (did you mean graphite?) stick, give it a try. If you don’t like it, wash it off or paint over it. You may be on the cutting edge of a new technique. If you are talking about graphite, I would think it will just be black, but it would be interesting to know for sure. Powdered graphite does have a sheen to it, but it is way too dark IMHO.

Jim Marlett