How To Paint Black Styrene Models


Wayne
 
Edited

Can't find anything online for this.  Just completed 2 very old HOn3 E&B Valley RR Co models:  C&S Baggage Car and C&S Business Car B-3.  They are both black styrene so I decided to work on the more common one first, in case I have to re-start from scratch.  I'm trying to paint the Baggage car Pullman Green.  There was a missing part that I replaced with white scribbed styrene and that part is starting to look great after 4 airbrush coats of "Modelers Decals & Paint" acrylic Pullman Green, but the black plastic still looks black.  Should I have primed the plastic with grey primer first?  What experience do you folks have with this?


Wayne
 

Forgot the photo.


Mike Conder
 

Yes prime with gray first. Been there, done that. 

Mike Conder

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 2:45 PM Wayne <waynewtaylorii@...> wrote:
Forgot the photo.


Towne Comee
 

Recommendation would have been to apply a couple of coats of thin primer first - before painting.  Using a neutral color (light grey or a muted white) will make a uniform surface and will enable the final paint to be all one shade.  It can vary when laid upon black and other sections are white.


Rick Rhode <rvrhode@...>
 

Definitely use a grey primer.  I use either a light gray NON filling primer from Walmart or Tamiya light gray primer.

On Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 05:35:10 PM EDT, Towne Comee <prowordsmith@...> wrote:


Recommendation would have been to apply a couple of coats of thin primer first - before painting.  Using a neutral color (light grey or a muted white) will make a uniform surface and will enable the final paint to be all one shade.  It can vary when laid upon black and other sections are white.


Wayne
 

Thanks for all the tips.  Can't believe this information can't be found on an internet search.  Glad I did it on a lower priced model that had missing parts and had been started by the prior owner and not done that well.  Chalk it up to the cost of education.


On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 4:45 PM Rick Rhode via groups.io <rvrhode=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Definitely use a grey primer.  I use either a light gray NON filling primer from Walmart or Tamiya light gray primer.

On Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 05:35:10 PM EDT, Towne Comee <prowordsmith@...> wrote:


Recommendation would have been to apply a couple of coats of thin primer first - before painting.  Using a neutral color (light grey or a muted white) will make a uniform surface and will enable the final paint to be all one shade.  It can vary when laid upon black and other sections are white.



--
Wayne Taylor


Ric Case
 

Wayne you can still spray a couple of light coats of gray over the paint you have already sprayed as long as it isn’t too thick of a application.
I’ve always used floquil. 
I don’t really like the water based paint but sometime soon I’ll have to start looking at it  

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Oct 21, 2020, at 6:51 PM, Wayne <waynewtaylorii@...> wrote:


Thanks for all the tips.  Can't believe this information can't be found on an internet search.  Glad I did it on a lower priced model that had missing parts and had been started by the prior owner and not done that well.  Chalk it up to the cost of education.

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 4:45 PM Rick Rhode via groups.io <rvrhode=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Definitely use a grey primer.  I use either a light gray NON filling primer from Walmart or Tamiya light gray primer.

On Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 05:35:10 PM EDT, Towne Comee <prowordsmith@...> wrote:


Recommendation would have been to apply a couple of coats of thin primer first - before painting.  Using a neutral color (light grey or a muted white) will make a uniform surface and will enable the final paint to be all one shade.  It can vary when laid upon black and other sections are white.



--
Wayne Taylor


John Stutz
 

Wayne

You may be able to start over: Many acrylic paints can be stripped with with alcohol, which will not affect styrene if it is bonded with a solvent or a styrene cement.  My recollection is that 91% isopropyl works well, but you may also want to try ethyl.  Both should be available from any drug store. 

John Stutz

On October 21, 2020 3:51 PM Wayne <waynewtaylorii@...> wrote:


Thanks for all the tips.  Can't believe this information can't be found on an internet search.  Glad I did it on a lower priced model that had missing parts and had been started by the prior owner and not done that well.  Chalk it up to the cost of education.

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 4:45 PM Rick Rhode via groups.io <rvrhode= yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Definitely use a grey primer.  I use either a light gray NON filling primer from Walmart or Tamiya light gray primer.

On Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 05:35:10 PM EDT, Towne Comee < prowordsmith@...> wrote:


Recommendation would have been to apply a couple of coats of thin primer first - before painting.  Using a neutral color (light grey or a muted white) will make a uniform surface and will enable the final paint to be all one shade.  It can vary when laid upon black and other sections are white.





--
Wayne Taylor


Mark Kasprowicz
 

I'm always a little wary of using a rattle can mainly because the flow control can be eratic - all it takes is a little too much pressure and the object is laden with paint or too little and the nozzle splutters. That said companies like Krylon make very good paint - if only they sold it in tins rather than aerosols.

As for switching from oil based to water based pints, we've just learned that Testors are no longer exporting Dullcote from the US. I've never used anything else! But I saw some results using Vallejo Matt Resin and I was very impressed.

Mark K
Oxon England.


bassb04011
 

Tamiya primer for plastic & metal works wonderfully with much better flow control. Little pricey but worth every penny.
Brian Bass


On Oct 22, 2020, at 4:05 AM, Mark Kasprowicz <mark@...> wrote:

I'm always a little wary of using a rattle can mainly because the flow control can be eratic - all it takes is a little too much pressure and the object is laden with paint or too little and the nozzle splutters. That said companies like Krylon make very good paint - if only they sold it in tins rather than aerosols.

As for switching from oil based to water based pints, we've just learned that Testors are no longer exporting Dullcote from the US. I've never used anything else! But I saw some results using Vallejo Matt Resin and I was very impressed.

Mark K
Oxon England.


Ken Martin
 

I switched from Dullcoat to Model Masters Flat(lusterless) several years ago as it gives me a better finish. It is a rattle can but it does give me a finish I prefer to Dullcoat.

Ken Martin



On Oct 22, 2020, at 1:05 AM, Mark Kasprowicz <mark@...> wrote:

As for switching from oil based to water based pints, we've just learned that Testors are no longer exporting Dullcote from the US. I've never used anything else! But I saw some results using Vallejo Matt Resin and I was very impressed.

Mark K
Oxon England.
_._\


LARRY KLOSE
 

I use PBL Star Brand lacquer. I just finished painting a PBL stock car kit with freight car red. The kit has light gray, dark gray and black parts and everything came out uniform with no bleed from the various under colors. Before I buttoned it up I painted the interior with natural wood color, a medium yellow with a brown cast and the formerly dark gray plastic on the doors matched the light gray plastic area of the sides and ends. All one coat. I had similar results with reefer yellow sides on an RGS reefer. All the paint applies with very thin coats that do not obscure detail. It dries hard and satiny smooth, perfect for decals. It does not damage plastic when sprayed.

I overcoat everything with Star clear flat which is a lot thinner coat than dull coat.

It’s lacquer so precautions are necessary. Well worth the effort given the results.

The Sn3 list has several discussions on using this paint. Well worth checking the archives to shorten the learning curve. Retarder (available in the product line) is a must to avoid orange peel—it dries very quickly otherwise.

Larry Klose
Sent from my iPadn


Mark Kasprowicz
 

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 07:23 AM, LARRY KLOSE wrote:
Retarder (available in the product line) is a must to avoid orange peel
Pah!!!! Now he tells me!!!!
In all seriousness they make good paint but the fact that its lacquer based makes it impossible to move internationally and as you say you need to take precautions. I've learned to airbrush with acrylics and get good results. But it was a bit of a struggle to adapt as I started with UK Humbrol paints many more years ago that I care to recall, so I had a natural resistance to something water based. It helped greatly when I started using dedicated thinners rather than plain water and now I use a formula found on a Military Modelling site. It made all the difference.

Mark K
Oxon England.


tonyk537
 

Have messed with acrylic a little bit and unhappy every time.  With the availability of PBL's Star brand and Scalecoat enamel I won't mess with acrylics again.  Scalecoat has such a huge range of colors. and they are in normal production.  You can order directly from the source.
https://www.minutemanscalemodels.com/

Love to shoot Star also.  
https://www.p-b-l.com/


lloyd lehrer
 

Mark be so kind as to share the formula for the dedicated thinner mixes.

lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020, 9:22 AM Mark Kasprowicz <mark@...> wrote:
On Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 07:23 AM, LARRY KLOSE wrote:
Retarder (available in the product line) is a must to avoid orange peel
Pah!!!! Now he tells me!!!!
In all seriousness they make good paint but the fact that its lacquer based makes it impossible to move internationally and as you say you need to take precautions. I've learned to airbrush with acrylics and get good results. But it was a bit of a struggle to adapt as I started with UK Humbrol paints many more years ago that I care to recall, so I had a natural resistance to something water based. It helped greatly when I started using dedicated thinners rather than plain water and now I use a formula found on a Military Modelling site. It made all the difference.

Mark K
Oxon England.


--
lloyd lehrer


Mike Conder
 

I'm just the opposite, I've only used acrylics with my airbrush and have been very happy with the results.  I use either either dentaured alcohol or, if that reacts with the paint, the paint company's thinner.  But interested in this thinner mix from the military modelers ... they have great stuff!

On spray cans, I always make sure the can is at room temperature or warmer (sometimes put the can in a medium warm water bath for 10-15 minutes) and then spray multiple very thin coats.  Never had any issues except when I got in a hurry and put too many coats on too quickly.  And I only use Krylon or Rustoleum or other top brands ... never the "generic house brand" of spray paint.  YMMV of course.

Mike Conder


Mark Kasprowicz
 

Not sure where the first mail went to but here we go again.
40 mL distilled water
20 mL Isopropyl Alcohol
1 mL flow improver - Vallejo 71.262
1 mL fluid retarder. Liquitex

It smells rather ;ike Tamiya's and the military modellers reckon it;s a goodun.

Mark


bassb04011
 

I recently got a cloudy finish with my Star flat clear.  Any tips on avoiding this? 

On a separate note, I recently sprayed Mission Models paint and wow is it wonderful.  It's basically water based but does use it's own thinner vice water.  You mix a couple drops of their poly in and it goes on wonderfully with almost no odor.
Thanks,
Brian


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of LARRY KLOSE <lklose@...>
Sent: Thursday, October 22, 2020 10:23 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] How To Paint Black Styrene Models
 
I use PBL Star Brand lacquer. I just finished painting a PBL stock car kit with freight car red. The kit has light gray, dark gray and black parts and everything came out uniform with no bleed from the various under colors. Before I buttoned it up I painted the interior with natural wood color, a medium yellow with a brown cast and the formerly dark gray plastic on the doors matched the light gray plastic area of the sides and ends. All one coat. I had similar results with reefer yellow sides on an RGS reefer. All the paint applies with very thin coats that do not obscure detail.  It dries hard and satiny smooth, perfect for decals. It does not damage plastic when sprayed.

I overcoat everything with Star clear flat which is a lot thinner coat than dull coat.

It’s lacquer so precautions are necessary. Well worth the effort given the results.

The Sn3 list has several discussions on using this paint. Well worth checking the archives to shorten the learning curve. Retarder (available in the product line) is a must to avoid orange peel—it dries very quickly otherwise.

Larry Klose
n






Mark Kasprowicz
 

Try  light spray with with isopropyl alcohol.

Mark K


Wayne
 

Won't be able to start over by soaking in alcohol because the model is finished.  I haven't painted the underside yet and the truss rods are 4lb test monofilament and are secured by ACC.  On the inside floor I've added a lead weight (painted) which is held in place by Goo.  The alcohol would most likely have a negative effect on these adhesives and maybe even the fish line.

I think I'll brush on a light coat of primer on the parts that were originally back plastic and the finish by airbrushing Pullman green over the result.

--
Wayne Taylor