Staining ties


Bill Lugg
 

I've got a large quantity (10,000) of Kappler ties that are now about a year and maybe a half old (stored in a plastic bag, in a climate controlled basement) that I've been using Mike Chambers' (https://www.rustystumps.com/RSSMDownloads/Inking%20Stripwood.pdf) simplest recipe to stain (in batches of 1,000 to 1,500 as I need them).  The first batch I did soon after I received them from Kappler stained well and quickly using the 70% alcohol/black ink mixture.  The batch I'm doing now using the same stain (not a new batch) I've left overnight and they haven't shown much change.  I even drained the liquid off, added more ink to the mix and poured it back in before letting them sit overnight, but this morning it seems to have barely touched the ties.

Is it possible the alcohol has lost its potency in the intervening time?  Or could the ties have changed their characteristics in a year and a half of sitting?

Some Ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Bill Lugg


John G Massura
 

Bill,

I have some stain that is 40+ years old - shoe dye in denatured alcohol. Still works fine. When the solution evaporates some, I add more alcohol.

John Massura

On Oct 19, 2020, at 10:13, Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net> wrote:

I've got a large quantity (10,000) of Kappler ties that are now about a year and maybe a half old (stored in a plastic bag, in a climate controlled basement) that I've been using Mike Chambers' (https://www.rustystumps.com/RSSMDownloads/Inking%20Stripwood.pdf) simplest recipe to stain (in batches of 1,000 to 1,500 as I need them). The first batch I did soon after I received them from Kappler stained well and quickly using the 70% alcohol/black ink mixture. The batch I'm doing now using the same stain (not a new batch) I've left overnight and they haven't shown much change. I even drained the liquid off, added more ink to the mix and poured it back in before letting them sit overnight, but this morning it seems to have barely touched the ties.

Is it possible the alcohol has lost its potency in the intervening time? Or could the ties have changed their characteristics in a year and a half of sitting?

Some Ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Bill Lugg





Ric Case
 

Bill you will find that the ties will dry out and harden! This happens to most woods as they cure! This can be corrected some times by soaking the ties in a water alcohol mixture this will sometimes increase absorption!
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694

On Oct 19, 2020, at 11:46 AM, John G Massura <jmassura@longjohnonline.org> wrote:

Bill,

I have some stain that is 40+ years old - shoe dye in denatured alcohol. Still works fine. When the solution evaporates some, I add more alcohol.

John Massura

On Oct 19, 2020, at 10:13, Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net> wrote:

I've got a large quantity (10,000) of Kappler ties that are now about a year and maybe a half old (stored in a plastic bag, in a climate controlled basement) that I've been using Mike Chambers' (https://www.rustystumps.com/RSSMDownloads/Inking%20Stripwood.pdf) simplest recipe to stain (in batches of 1,000 to 1,500 as I need them). The first batch I did soon after I received them from Kappler stained well and quickly using the 70% alcohol/black ink mixture. The batch I'm doing now using the same stain (not a new batch) I've left overnight and they haven't shown much change. I even drained the liquid off, added more ink to the mix and poured it back in before letting them sit overnight, but this morning it seems to have barely touched the ties.

Is it possible the alcohol has lost its potency in the intervening time? Or could the ties have changed their characteristics in a year and a half of sitting?

Some Ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Bill Lugg









Jim Marlett
 

I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91% isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials are cheap.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/

On Oct 19, 2020, at 10:13 AM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net> wrote:

I've got a large quantity (10,000) of Kappler ties that are now about a year and maybe a half old (stored in a plastic bag, in a climate controlled basement) that I've been using Mike Chambers' (https://www.rustystumps.com/RSSMDownloads/Inking%20Stripwood.pdf) simplest recipe to stain (in batches of 1,000 to 1,500 as I need them). The first batch I did soon after I received them from Kappler stained well and quickly using the 70% alcohol/black ink mixture. The batch I'm doing now using the same stain (not a new batch) I've left overnight and they haven't shown much change. I even drained the liquid off, added more ink to the mix and poured it back in before letting them sit overnight, but this morning it seems to have barely touched the ties.

Is it possible the alcohol has lost its potency in the intervening time? Or could the ties have changed their characteristics in a year and a half of sitting?

Some Ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Bill Lugg





Lee Gustafson
 

Alcohol evaporates and it also absorbs water, ambient humidity, the combination of those actions along with wood drying out reduces the effectiveness of the stain. The remedies soak the wood in some water, make a stronger stain with 91% alcohol and more dye.

Lee Gustafson

On Oct 19, 2020, at 11:43 AM, Jim Marlett <jmarlett@cox.net> wrote:

I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91% isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials are cheap.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Oct 19, 2020, at 10:13 AM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net> wrote:

I've got a large quantity (10,000) of Kappler ties that are now about a year and maybe a half old (stored in a plastic bag, in a climate controlled basement) that I've been using Mike Chambers' (https://www.rustystumps.com/RSSMDownloads/Inking%20Stripwood.pdf) simplest recipe to stain (in batches of 1,000 to 1,500 as I need them). The first batch I did soon after I received them from Kappler stained well and quickly using the 70% alcohol/black ink mixture. The batch I'm doing now using the same stain (not a new batch) I've left overnight and they haven't shown much change. I even drained the liquid off, added more ink to the mix and poured it back in before letting them sit overnight, but this morning it seems to have barely touched the ties.

Is it possible the alcohol has lost its potency in the intervening time? Or could the ties have changed their characteristics in a year and a half of sitting?

Some Ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Bill Lugg









Bill Lugg
 

I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half of soaking and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.

So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some of the alcohol carrier after sitting for so long.  I was going to try some 91% and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is rarer that hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a pandemic going on.  ;o)  I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop; will there be any detrimental effects from using that instead?

Thanks for the help
Bill Lugg

On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91% isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials are cheap.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


John G Massura
 

When my stain evaporates over time and becomes too dark, I add denatured alcohol to thin it out.

You can try with a couple oz of stain and add a few drops of denatured and see if there are any adverse effects.

John Massura

On Oct 20, 2020, at 19:04, Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net> wrote:

I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half of soaking and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.

So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some of the alcohol carrier after sitting for so long. I was going to try some 91% and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is rarer that hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a pandemic going on. ;o) I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop; will there be any detrimental effects from using that instead?

Thanks for the help
Bill Lugg


On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91% isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials are cheap.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/





lloyd lehrer
 

Bill, wear nitrile gloves.  too much thru the skin absorption is not good.
lloyd lehrer, MANHATTAN BEACH, CA (310)951-9097


On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 5:04 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half of soaking
and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.

So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some of the
alcohol carrier after sitting for so long.  I was going to try some 91%
and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is rarer that
hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a pandemic going
on.  ;o)  I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop; will there
be any detrimental effects from using that instead?

Thanks for the help
Bill Lugg


On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
> I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91% isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials are cheap.
>
> Jim Marlett
> http://flatheaddrag.com/
> http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/
>
>






--
lloyd lehrer


Dale Buxton
 

All I have ever used is denatured alcohol and Fiebing Leather dye. Never had any problems with it. I feel this mixture gives superior penetration and prevents warping in longer lengths of strip wood. Like higher percentages of water to alcohol might. I live in Colorado so I’ve never had a problem with the alcohol drawing water out of the air. It’s just too dry here! Lol

Dale Buxton

On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 18:10 lloyd lehrer <lloydlehrer@...> wrote:
Bill, wear nitrile gloves.  too much thru the skin absorption is not good.
lloyd lehrer, MANHATTAN BEACH, CA (310)951-9097


On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 5:04 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half of soaking
and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.

So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some of the
alcohol carrier after sitting for so long.  I was going to try some 91%
and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is rarer that
hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a pandemic going
on.  ;o)  I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop; will there
be any detrimental effects from using that instead?

Thanks for the help
Bill Lugg


On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
> I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91% isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials are cheap.
>
> Jim Marlett
> http://flatheaddrag.com/
> http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/
>
>






--
lloyd lehrer


Mike Conder
 

Me too, only DNA and Feibings USMC Black or brown.  Even 91% IPA has water which can warp wood, so I don’t use it. 

Be careful, though, to use it as a stain over paint.  Don’t overdo it as the DNA is also a great paint remover.  Guess how I know?

Mike Conder 

On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 6:45 PM Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...> wrote:
All I have ever used is denatured alcohol and Fiebing Leather dye. Never had any problems with it. I feel this mixture gives superior penetration and prevents warping in longer lengths of strip wood. Like higher percentages of water to alcohol might. I live in Colorado so I’ve never had a problem with the alcohol drawing water out of the air. It’s just too dry here! Lol

Dale Buxton

On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 18:10 lloyd lehrer <lloydlehrer@...> wrote:
Bill, wear nitrile gloves.  too much thru the skin absorption is not good.
lloyd lehrer, MANHATTAN BEACH, CA (310)951-9097


On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 5:04 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half of soaking
and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.

So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some of the
alcohol carrier after sitting for so long.  I was going to try some 91%
and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is rarer that
hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a pandemic going
on.  ;o)  I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop; will there
be any detrimental effects from using that instead?

Thanks for the help
Bill Lugg


On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
> I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91% isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials are cheap.
>
> Jim Marlett
> http://flatheaddrag.com/
> http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/
>
>






--
lloyd lehrer


Bill Lugg
 

What part of Colorado?  I live out on the eastern plains.

I've got some Fiebings coming from Amazon, so when it gets here I'll give it a try with the DNA.

Thanks
Bill Lugg

On 10/20/20 6:45 PM, Dale Buxton wrote:
All I have ever used is denatured alcohol and Fiebing Leather dye. Never had any problems with it. I feel this mixture gives superior penetration and prevents warping in longer lengths of strip wood. Like higher percentages of water to alcohol might. I live in Colorado so I’ve never had a problem with the alcohol drawing water out of the air. It’s just too dry here! Lol

Dale Buxton

On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 18:10 lloyd lehrer <lloydlehrer@gmail.com <mailto:lloydlehrer@gmail.com>> wrote:

Bill, wear nitrile gloves.  too much thru the skin absorption is
not good.
lloyd lehrer, MANHATTAN BEACH, CA (310)951-9097


On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 5:04 PM Bill Lugg
<luggw1@risebroadband.net <mailto:luggw1@risebroadband.net>> wrote:

I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half
of soaking
and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.

So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some
of the
alcohol carrier after sitting for so long.  I was going to try
some 91%
and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is
rarer that
hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a
pandemic going
on.  ;o)  I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop;
will there
be any detrimental effects from using that instead?

Thanks for the help
Bill Lugg


On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
> I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91%
isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently
stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained
just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have
been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and
they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not
inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated
out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I
think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials
are cheap.
>
> Jim Marlett
> http://flatheaddrag.com/
> http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/
>
>






--
lloyd lehrer


Jim Marlett
 

I think any kind of alcohol would work. I say just try it. I don’t know why I haven’t!

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/

On Oct 20, 2020, at 7:04 PM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net> wrote:

I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half of soaking and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.

So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some of the alcohol carrier after sitting for so long. I was going to try some 91% and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is rarer that hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a pandemic going on. ;o) I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop; will there be any detrimental effects from using that instead?

Thanks for the help
Bill Lugg


On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91% isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials are cheap.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/





John Hutnick
 

Ace Hardware in Somerville NJ sold me a gallon of 99% isopropyl for $30.


Dale Buxton
 

I live in Aurora.

I think you will really like Fiebings. I get mine from the Tandy Leather Factory at I-70 and Forrest St. in Denver. It's about 2 city blocks east  of the Safeway Warehouse. I use a mix of Black and Medium Brown. I never keep track of the mix ratio because I want to always have a variation in different structure's degree of wood age weathering. Same goes for my ties. I will mix three batches of dye and stain three batches of ties. When they are dry, I mix them all together.

Nature hates same-ness!

Dale Buxton

On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 9:13 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
What part of Colorado?  I live out on the eastern plains.

I've got some Fiebings coming from Amazon, so when it gets here I'll
give it a try with the DNA.

Thanks
Bill Lugg


On 10/20/20 6:45 PM, Dale Buxton wrote:
> All I have ever used is denatured alcohol and Fiebing Leather dye.
> Never had any problems with it. I feel this mixture gives superior
> penetration and prevents warping in longer lengths of strip wood. Like
> higher percentages of water to alcohol might. I live in Colorado so
> I’ve never had a problem with the alcohol drawing water out of the
> air. It’s just too dry here! Lol
>
> Dale Buxton
>
> On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 18:10 lloyd lehrer <lloydlehrer@...
> <mailto:lloydlehrer@...>> wrote:
>
>     Bill, wear nitrile gloves.  too much thru the skin absorption is
>     not good.
>     lloyd lehrer, MANHATTAN BEACH, CA (310)951-9097
>
>
>     On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 5:04 PM Bill Lugg
>     <luggw1@... <mailto:luggw1@...>> wrote:
>
>         I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half
>         of soaking
>         and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.
>
>         So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some
>         of the
>         alcohol carrier after sitting for so long.  I was going to try
>         some 91%
>         and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is
>         rarer that
>         hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a
>         pandemic going
>         on.  ;o)  I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop;
>         will there
>         be any detrimental effects from using that instead?
>
>         Thanks for the help
>         Bill Lugg
>
>
>         On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
>         > I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91%
>         isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently
>         stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained
>         just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have
>         been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and
>         they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not
>         inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated
>         out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I
>         think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials
>         are cheap.
>         >
>         > Jim Marlett
>         > http://flatheaddrag.com/
>         > http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/
>         >
>         >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>     --
>     lloyd lehrer
>
>






tonyk537
 

Boring modeling = the lack of variety.  I agree Dale!  


Mike Conder
 

Bill Lugg, you're out east of the Springs, right?  I'm in Highlands Ranch at times and Alma at other times ... splitting our time in both places.

Mike Conder

On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 9:13 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
What part of Colorado?  I live out on the eastern plains.

I've got some Fiebings coming from Amazon, so when it gets here I'll
give it a try with the DNA.

Thanks
Bill Lugg


On 10/20/20 6:45 PM, Dale Buxton wrote:
> All I have ever used is denatured alcohol and Fiebing Leather dye.
> Never had any problems with it. I feel this mixture gives superior
> penetration and prevents warping in longer lengths of strip wood. Like
> higher percentages of water to alcohol might. I live in Colorado so
> I’ve never had a problem with the alcohol drawing water out of the
> air. It’s just too dry here! Lol
>
> Dale Buxton
>
> On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 18:10 lloyd lehrer <lloydlehrer@...
> <mailto:lloydlehrer@...>> wrote:
>
>     Bill, wear nitrile gloves.  too much thru the skin absorption is
>     not good.
>     lloyd lehrer, MANHATTAN BEACH, CA (310)951-9097
>
>
>     On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 5:04 PM Bill Lugg
>     <luggw1@... <mailto:luggw1@...>> wrote:
>
>         I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half
>         of soaking
>         and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.
>
>         So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some
>         of the
>         alcohol carrier after sitting for so long.  I was going to try
>         some 91%
>         and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is
>         rarer that
>         hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a
>         pandemic going
>         on.  ;o)  I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop;
>         will there
>         be any detrimental effects from using that instead?
>
>         Thanks for the help
>         Bill Lugg
>
>
>         On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
>         > I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91%
>         isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently
>         stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they stained
>         just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may have
>         been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got them) and
>         they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it is not
>         inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has evaporated
>         out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I
>         think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The materials
>         are cheap.
>         >
>         > Jim Marlett
>         > http://flatheaddrag.com/
>         > http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/
>         >
>         >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>     --
>     lloyd lehrer
>
>






Bill Lugg
 

Yep, some say I live in Kansas, it's really Calhan.  I had to look up Alma on the map - I see it's NW of Fairplay a bit - pretty country up there.

Funny thing is when I was working at Peterson AFB, my commute was no longer time wise than the folks that lived at the north end of the Springs...and I didn't have to deal with traffic.

Bill

On 10/23/20 11:24 PM, Mike Conder wrote:
Bill Lugg, you're out east of the Springs, right? I'm in Highlands Ranch at times and Alma at other times ... splitting our time in both places.

Mike Conder

On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 9:13 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net <mailto:luggw1@risebroadband.net>> wrote:

What part of Colorado?  I live out on the eastern plains.

I've got some Fiebings coming from Amazon, so when it gets here I'll
give it a try with the DNA.

Thanks
Bill Lugg


On 10/20/20 6:45 PM, Dale Buxton wrote:
> All I have ever used is denatured alcohol and Fiebing Leather dye.
> Never had any problems with it. I feel this mixture gives superior
> penetration and prevents warping in longer lengths of strip
wood. Like
> higher percentages of water to alcohol might. I live in Colorado so
> I’ve never had a problem with the alcohol drawing water out of the
> air. It’s just too dry here! Lol
>
> Dale Buxton
>
> On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 18:10 lloyd lehrer
<lloydlehrer@gmail.com <mailto:lloydlehrer@gmail.com>
> <mailto:lloydlehrer@gmail.com <mailto:lloydlehrer@gmail.com>>>
wrote:
>
>     Bill, wear nitrile gloves.  too much thru the skin absorption is
>     not good.
>     lloyd lehrer, MANHATTAN BEACH, CA (310)951-9097
>
>
>     On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 5:04 PM Bill Lugg
>     <luggw1@risebroadband.net <mailto:luggw1@risebroadband.net>
<mailto:luggw1@risebroadband.net
<mailto:luggw1@risebroadband.net>>> wrote:
>
>         I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half
>         of soaking
>         and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.
>
>         So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some
>         of the
>         alcohol carrier after sitting for so long.  I was going
to try
>         some 91%
>         and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is
>         rarer that
>         hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a
>         pandemic going
>         on.  ;o)  I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop;
>         will there
>         be any detrimental effects from using that instead?
>
>         Thanks for the help
>         Bill Lugg
>
>
>         On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
>         > I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91%
>         isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently
>         stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they
stained
>         just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may
have
>         been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got
them) and
>         they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it
is not
>         inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has
evaporated
>         out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I
>         think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The
materials
>         are cheap.
>         >
>         > Jim Marlett
>         > http://flatheaddrag.com/
>         > http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/
>         >
>         >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>     --
>     lloyd lehrer
>
>






Mike Conder
 

Meh, only 90 minutes from me ... and only halfway to Limon.

Of course, I think Kansas starts about the eastern edge of Aurora (where I used to live.)

Mike Conder

On Sat, Oct 24, 2020 at 7:48 AM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
Yep, some say I live in Kansas, it's really Calhan.  I had to look up
Alma on the map - I see it's NW of Fairplay a bit - pretty country up there.

Funny thing is when I was working at Peterson AFB, my commute was no
longer time wise than the folks that lived at the north end of the
Springs...and I didn't have to deal with traffic.

Bill


On 10/23/20 11:24 PM, Mike Conder wrote:
> Bill Lugg, you're out east of the Springs, right? I'm in Highlands
> Ranch at times and Alma at other times ... splitting our time in both
> places.
>
> Mike Conder
>
> On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 9:13 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...
> <mailto:luggw1@...>> wrote:
>
>     What part of Colorado?  I live out on the eastern plains.
>
>     I've got some Fiebings coming from Amazon, so when it gets here I'll
>     give it a try with the DNA.
>
>     Thanks
>     Bill Lugg
>
>
>     On 10/20/20 6:45 PM, Dale Buxton wrote:
>     > All I have ever used is denatured alcohol and Fiebing Leather dye.
>     > Never had any problems with it. I feel this mixture gives superior
>     > penetration and prevents warping in longer lengths of strip
>     wood. Like
>     > higher percentages of water to alcohol might. I live in Colorado so
>     > I’ve never had a problem with the alcohol drawing water out of the
>     > air. It’s just too dry here! Lol
>     >
>     > Dale Buxton
>     >
>     > On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 18:10 lloyd lehrer
>     <lloydlehrer@... <mailto:lloydlehrer@...>
>     > <mailto:lloydlehrer@... <mailto:lloydlehrer@...>>>
>     wrote:
>     >
>     >     Bill, wear nitrile gloves.  too much thru the skin absorption is
>     >     not good.
>     >     lloyd lehrer, MANHATTAN BEACH, CA (310)951-9097
>     >
>     >
>     >     On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 5:04 PM Bill Lugg
>     >     <luggw1@... <mailto:luggw1@...>
>     <mailto:luggw1@...
>     <mailto:luggw1@...>>> wrote:
>     >
>     >         I pulled the ties out of the solution after a day and a half
>     >         of soaking
>     >         and they looked like very lightly weathered wood.
>     >
>     >         So, I think you all are right that my solution has lost some
>     >         of the
>     >         alcohol carrier after sitting for so long.  I was going
>     to try
>     >         some 91%
>     >         and shoe dye to see how it works, but discovered alcohol is
>     >         rarer that
>     >         hen's teeth right now - apparently there's some kid of a
>     >         pandemic going
>     >         on.  ;o)  I have a gallon of denatured alcohol in the shop;
>     >         will there
>     >         be any detrimental effects from using that instead?
>     >
>     >         Thanks for the help
>     >         Bill Lugg
>     >
>     >
>     >         On 10/19/20 10:43 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
>     >         > I don’t have a clue what is going on, but I use 91%
>     >         isopropyl alcohol and shoe leather dye. I just recently
>     >         stained some ties I’ve had for over 40 years and they
>     stained
>     >         just fine. I also stained some old Kappler ties that may
>     have
>     >         been 20 or 30 years old (I can’t remember when I got
>     them) and
>     >         they stained fine as well. If you used 70% alcohol, it
>     is not
>     >         inconceivable that at least part of the alcohol has
>     evaporated
>     >         out and water isn’t as good a carrier as alcohol, IMHO. I
>     >         think I would mix up a whole new batch of stain. The
>     materials
>     >         are cheap.
>     >         >
>     >         > Jim Marlett
>     >         > http://flatheaddrag.com/
>     >         > http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/
>     >         >
>     >         >
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     >
>     >     --
>     >     lloyd lehrer
>     >
>     >
>
>
>
>
>
>






Bill Lugg
 

Well, I finally gathered together, some Fiebings USMC black and dark brown, mixed it in equal parts with DNA and poured it over those stubborn ties.  In less than five minutes I had the most beautiful creosoted ties you've ever seen.

Now to mix up some variations so they don't all look the same.

Thanks so much for the excellent pointers.  It appears Fiebings and DNA is the ticket.
Bill Lugg

On 10/21/20 5:45 AM, Dale Buxton wrote:
I live in Aurora.

I think you will really like Fiebings. I get mine from the Tandy Leather Factory at I-70 and Forrest St. in Denver. It's about 2 city blocks east  of the Safeway Warehouse. I use a mix of Black and Medium Brown. I never keep track of the mix ratio because I want to always have a variation in different structure's degree of wood age weathering. Same goes for my ties. I will mix three batches of dye and stain three batches of ties. When they are dry, I mix them all together.

Nature hates same-ness!

Dale Buxton


Mike Conder
 

Bill, I mix the black and brown in separate bottles.  Whe I stain,  I start with black and poor a little into a glass flat- bottomed dishand start staining. As the liquid depletes I add some brown stain.  As that depletes I keep adding more stain,  mixing it up so each time is a slightly different color.   Eventually I get a plie of wood that has good variation in tone but not too variable. 

Mike Conder 

On Sat, Oct 31, 2020, 11:53 AM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
Well, I finally gathered together, some Fiebings USMC black and dark
brown, mixed it in equal parts with DNA and poured it over those
stubborn ties.  In less than five minutes I had the most beautiful
creosoted ties you've ever seen.

Now to mix up some variations so they don't all look the same.

Thanks so much for the excellent pointers.  It appears Fiebings and DNA
is the ticket.
Bill Lugg


On 10/21/20 5:45 AM, Dale Buxton wrote:
> I live in Aurora.
>
> I think you will really like Fiebings. I get mine from the Tandy
> Leather Factory at I-70 and Forrest St. in Denver. It's about 2 city
> blocks east  of the Safeway Warehouse. I use a mix of Black and Medium
> Brown. I never keep track of the mix ratio because I want to always
> have a variation in different structure's degree of wood age
> weathering. Same goes for my ties. I will mix three batches of dye and
> stain three batches of ties. When they are dry, I mix them all together.
>
> Nature hates same-ness!
>
> Dale Buxton
>
>