Date   
Re: Wanted: Grandt Line Boxcab kit (earlier version)

hiroechan
 

Alright, does anyone *else* have any of the older Grandt Line 23-ton boxcabs, either assembled or kits, with the Faulhaber gearhead can motor?
Brian snagged both of Lloyd's, and I still need a few myself.

Can also trade quantities of finished, kit-built, decorated D&RGW boxcars, high-side gons, drop-bottom gons, MOW camp cars, derricks, water towers, section houses, etc. Email for complete list. 

--Drew McCann 


ALCo K-28 article

John Stutz
 

Following up on my previous comments, I attach a copy of the Railway Review article on the D&RGW K-28s.

For those not familiar with the Steam Era's railroad technical publications, most of the published locomotive descriptions were anonymous.  These appear to have been prepared by the builder's sales departments and published with more or less editing by the journal.  Many consist of little more than a photograph and table of standard dimensions, often not much more than what is on a BLW photopaster.   The more detailed descriptions usually contain a side view drawing, often with cross sections, such as were also sublished in the Locomotive Dictionaries and Cyclopedias.

This article is one of the longest that I've  run across, with a most unusual amount of detail contrasting the current design from the previous version. I view it as a sales piece, not for K-28s, but for substituting modern up to date locomotives for older types.  The writer has taken full advantage of the 20 years separating the K-27s from the K-28s, to catalog the improvements incorporated in the K-28s, and how they affected operating results.

The article also raises a couple questions.  It is stated that the K-28s had the Franklin lateral motion axle box on the lead driver's axle, and the drawing confirms that this one differs from the others.  I have not seen this mentioned elsewhere.  Can anyone confirm its continued use, or give an approximate date for when it was removed?

Both the drawing and the builder's photograph show South African style drifting valves atop each end of the piston valves.  Yet the text makes no mention of these, and in-service photographs show the valve ports blanked off.  Does anyone have definite information as to when and why these were removed?  And why the K-36 and K-37 cylinders also have drifting valve ports?

John Stutz

Re: ALCo K-28 article

Earl Knoob
 

Thank you for posting this, as I had never seen it before.  The K-28's were quite revolutionary for the time.  I wonder how many superheated narrow gauge locomotives had been built before this.  They did wake up the D&RGW to what a modern engine could do to the system, paving the way for the K-36 and later K-37 classes, not mention the rebuilding of the K-27 class into near duplicates of the K-28's.

The K-28's K-36's and K-37's all have lateral motion devices on the front drivers.  This allows the front drivers to move sideways in sharp curves, reducing flange wear.  Extra lateral is built into the fit between the driving box and shoes and wedges.  An interesting arrangement with the spring saddle above the frame makes the springs push the boxes to the center of the engine.  When the engine negotiates a curve the driving box moves sideways, increasing the tension on the driver spring, which tries to push the box back creating a centering device.  This became a common feature on larger engines run in mountainous territory with sharp curves.  The D&RGW's big standard gauge 2-10-2's had lateral motion devices on the front AND rear drivers.

One error I found the article is it says the locomotives came with 6-ET air brakes.  This is incorrect.  The K-28's (and 36's and 37's) had old style G-6 valves with A-1 brakes.  They didn't get changed until after WWII, so the engines that went to Alaska never got refitted with 6-ET.

As the the drifting valves installed as built.  They do not seem to have lasted too long.  the fact that the 36's and 36's are built with the porting on top of the steam chests has always been a mystery to me.


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of John Stutz <john.stutz@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 6, 2019 11:34 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] ALCo K-28 article
 
Following up on my previous comments, I attach a copy of the Railway
Review article on the D&RGW K-28s.

For those not familiar with the Steam Era's railroad technical
publications, most of the published locomotive descriptions were
anonymous.  These appear to have been prepared by the builder's sales
departments and published with more or less editing by the journal. 
Many consist of little more than a photograph and table of standard
dimensions, often not much more than what is on a BLW photopaster.   The
more detailed descriptions usually contain a side view drawing, often
with cross sections, such as were also sublished in the Locomotive
Dictionaries and Cyclopedias.

This article is one of the longest that I've  run across, with a most
unusual amount of detail contrasting the current design from the
previous version. I view it as a sales piece, not for K-28s, but for
substituting modern up to date locomotives for older types.  The writer
has taken full advantage of the 20 years separating the K-27s from the
K-28s, to catalog the improvements incorporated in the K-28s, and how
they affected operating results.

The article also raises a couple questions.  It is stated that the K-28s
had the Franklin lateral motion axle box on the lead driver's axle, and
the drawing confirms that this one differs from the others.  I have not
seen this mentioned elsewhere.  Can anyone confirm its continued use, or
give an approximate date for when it was removed?

Both the drawing and the builder's photograph show South African style
drifting valves atop each end of the piston valves.  Yet the text makes
no mention of these, and in-service photographs show the valve ports
blanked off.  Does anyone have definite information as to when and why
these were removed?  And why the K-36 and K-37 cylinders also have
drifting valve ports?

John Stutz




rolling stock interchange/exchange

hiroechan
 

Folks,

 

Who all would be up for trading rolling stock around to get some new cars?

I have a large collection of professionally kit-built RTR D&RGW Boxcars (30+), gondolas (30+), PAX cars, MOW camp cars (12+), cranes, derricks, flats (some with loads), etc. I can provide an exact list, and even send photos; but this post is to gauge interest before I sit down to type up the spreadsheet.

 

What I'm looking for: 

Non-D&RGW boxcars, flats, gons, reefers, etc. Whimsical roadnames and oddball pieces. 

 

Thanks!

--Drew McCann

Re: rolling stock interchange/exchange

kevin b
 

i will be sending you an email off list.
watch for one from arcatruck13
thanks.
Kevin.

On Friday, June 7, 2019, 2:02:53 PM CDT, hiroechan <hiroechan@...> wrote:


Folks,

 

Who all would be up for trading rolling stock around to get some new cars?

I have a large collection of professionally kit-built RTR D&RGW Boxcars (30+), gondolas (30+), PAX cars, MOW camp cars (12+), cranes, derricks, flats (some with loads), etc. I can provide an exact list, and even send photos; but this post is to gauge interest before I sit down to type up the spreadsheet.

 

What I'm looking for: 

Non-D&RGW boxcars, flats, gons, reefers, etc. Whimsical roadnames and oddball pieces. 

 

Thanks!

--Drew McCann

For Sale PSC peak Roof Caboose

Doug Boudakian
 

For Sale HOn3 PSC brass peak Roof Caboose 0584. PSC#17276-1 . 30’ Long .Brand new with factory paint and windows. Flying Rio Grande Lettering. Pictures on request. $170. Shipping extra.

Doug Boudakian
@Durango

Truck size

Wes Garcia
 

I am finally building my Rail Line D&RGW boxcar kits. One thing that is overlooked in the instructions is what size truck to use. I plan to use archbar trucks, but what size, 4'8", 4'6" or 3'7". Any information will be very helpful. 

Thank you,
Wes 

Re: Truck size

bassb04011
 

3’7”
Brian 


On Jun 9, 2019, at 12:12 PM, Wes Garcia <wesgarcia@...> wrote:

I am finally building my Rail Line D&RGW boxcar kits. One thing that is overlooked in the instructions is what size truck to use. I plan to use archbar trucks, but what size, 4'8", 4'6" or 3'7". Any information will be very helpful. 

Thank you,
Wes 

Re: Truck size

Mark Lewis
 

Wes:

What Brian said.

Mark Lewis 

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019, 12:19 PM bassb04011 <fishingmaine@...> wrote:
3’7”
Brian 


On Jun 9, 2019, at 12:12 PM, Wes Garcia <wesgarcia@...> wrote:

I am finally building my Rail Line D&RGW boxcar kits. One thing that is overlooked in the instructions is what size truck to use. I plan to use archbar trucks, but what size, 4'8", 4'6" or 3'7". Any information will be very helpful. 

Thank you,
Wes 

Re: Truck size

Wes Garcia
 

Thanks Brian

 

Wes

From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> On Behalf Of bassb04011
Sent: Sunday, June 9, 2019 10:20 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Truck size

 

3’7”

Brian 


On Jun 9, 2019, at 12:12 PM, Wes Garcia <wesgarcia@...> wrote:

I am finally building my Rail Line D&RGW boxcar kits. One thing that is overlooked in the instructions is what size truck to use. I plan to use archbar trucks, but what size, 4'8", 4'6" or 3'7". Any information will be very helpful. 

Thank you,
Wes 

Re: Truck size

kevin b
 

I am finally building my Rail Line D&RGW boxcar kits. One thing that is overlooked in the instructions is what size truck to use. I plan to use archbar trucks, but what size, 4'8", 4'6" or 3'7". Any information will be very helpful.

Thank you,
Wes

i'd like to ask a question of you, and anyone else who'd care to respond, if I may.

what method do you intend to use to attach the trucks?
i'm curious to know how others do it.

myself, i cut off the pin and drill out for a screw.

thanks Kevin.

Re: Truck size

Mark Lewis
 

Kevin:

On Rail Line underframes, I also cut off the pin and drill and tap the bolster for the truck mounting screw.

Mark Lewis 

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019, 12:58 PM kevin b via Groups.Io <arcatruck13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am finally building my Rail Line D&RGW boxcar kits. One thing that is overlooked in the instructions is what size truck to use. I plan to use archbar trucks, but what size, 4'8", 4'6" or 3'7". Any information will be very helpful.

Thank you,
Wes

i'd like to ask a question of you, and anyone else who'd care to respond, if I may.

what method do you intend to use to attach the trucks?
i'm curious to know how others do it.

myself, i cut off the pin and drill out for a screw.

thanks Kevin.

Re: Truck size

Bill Lugg
 

Any idea what Rail Line was thinking when they cast the pins on the
floor for the trucks?  They're beautiful cars, but I've always been
stumped by that one "feature".

Bill Lugg

On 6/9/19 11:12 AM, Mark Lewis wrote:
Kevin:

On Rail Line underframes, I also cut off the pin and drill and tap the
bolster for the truck mounting screw.

Mark Lewis

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019, 12:58 PM kevin b via Groups.Io
<arcatruck13=yahoo.com@groups.io <mailto:yahoo.com@groups.io>> wrote:

I am finally building my Rail Line D&RGW boxcar kits. One thing
that is overlooked in the instructions is what size truck to use.
I plan to use archbar trucks, but what size, 4'8", 4'6" or 3'7".
Any information will be very helpful.

Thank you,
Wes

i'd like to ask a question of you, and anyone else who'd care to
respond, if I may.

what method do you intend to use to attach the trucks?
i'm curious to know how others do it.

myself, i cut off the pin and drill out for a screw.

thanks Kevin.

Re: Truck size

Mark Lewis
 

Bill:

Rail Line supplies 2 small rings on one of the parts spruces to be used to retain the trucks that are slipped over the cast on truck center pin.

The problem is that the ring needs to be glued on the post, or else they can fall off.....which makes removing trucks for maintenance, etc., almost impossible. 

Mark Lewis 

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019, 1:56 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
Any idea what Rail Line was thinking when they cast the pins on the
floor for the trucks?  They're beautiful cars, but I've always been
stumped by that one "feature".

Bill Lugg


On 6/9/19 11:12 AM, Mark Lewis wrote:
> Kevin:
>
> On Rail Line underframes, I also cut off the pin and drill and tap the
> bolster for the truck mounting screw.
>
> Mark Lewis
>
> On Sun, Jun 9, 2019, 12:58 PM kevin b via Groups.Io
> <arcatruck13=yahoo.com@groups.io <mailto:yahoo.com@groups.io>> wrote:
>
>     I am finally building my Rail Line D&RGW boxcar kits. One thing
>     that is overlooked in the instructions is what size truck to use.
>     I plan to use archbar trucks, but what size, 4'8", 4'6" or 3'7".
>     Any information will be very helpful.
>
>     Thank you,
>     Wes
>
>     i'd like to ask a question of you, and anyone else who'd care to
>     respond, if I may.
>
>     what method do you intend to use to attach the trucks?
>     i'm curious to know how others do it.
>
>     myself, i cut off the pin and drill out for a screw.
>
>     thanks Kevin.
>
>



Re: Truck size

Wes Garcia
 

Hi Kevin;

 

After looking at it last night, I think as others have said, “cut off the pin and drill and tap for a screw.

 

Wes

 

From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Lewis
Sent: Sunday, June 9, 2019 12:31 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Truck size

 

Bill:

 

Rail Line supplies 2 small rings on one of the parts spruces to be used to retain the trucks that are slipped over the cast on truck center pin.

 

The problem is that the ring needs to be glued on the post, or else they can fall off.....which makes removing trucks for maintenance, etc., almost impossible. 

 

Mark Lewis 

 

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019, 1:56 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:

Any idea what Rail Line was thinking when they cast the pins on the
floor for the trucks?  They're beautiful cars, but I've always been
stumped by that one "feature".

Bill Lugg


On 6/9/19 11:12 AM, Mark Lewis wrote:
> Kevin:
>
> On Rail Line underframes, I also cut off the pin and drill and tap the
> bolster for the truck mounting screw.
>
> Mark Lewis
>
> On Sun, Jun 9, 2019, 12:58 PM kevin b via Groups.Io
> <arcatruck13=yahoo.com@groups.io <mailto:yahoo.com@groups.io>> wrote:
>
>     I am finally building my Rail Line D&RGW boxcar kits. One thing
>     that is overlooked in the instructions is what size truck to use.
>     I plan to use archbar trucks, but what size, 4'8", 4'6" or 3'7".
>     Any information will be very helpful.
>
>     Thank you,
>     Wes
>
>     i'd like to ask a question of you, and anyone else who'd care to
>     respond, if I may.
>
>     what method do you intend to use to attach the trucks?
>     i'm curious to know how others do it.
>
>     myself, i cut off the pin and drill out for a screw.
>
>     thanks Kevin.
>
>


Re: Truck size

gnorwood6 gnorwood6
 

Wes,
Since getting my first Rail Line boxcar kit I have always cut off the pin.
Drill with number #58 drill (0.042") and use the self tapping screw that is provided with Kadee #714 couplers.
Depending on the brand of truck used shim washers may be required to set couplers to the correct height.
Gary



------ Original Message ------
From: "Wes Garcia" <wesgarcia@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Monday, 10 Jun, 2019 At 2:27 AM
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Truck size

Thanks Brian

 

Wes

From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> On Behalf Of bassb04011
Sent: Sunday, June 9, 2019 10:20 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Truck size

 

3’7”

Brian 


On Jun 9, 2019, at 12:12 PM, Wes Garcia <wesgarcia@...> wrote:

I am finally building my Rail Line D&RGW boxcar kits. One thing that is overlooked in the instructions is what size truck to use. I plan to use archbar trucks, but what size, 4'8", 4'6" or 3'7". Any information will be very helpful. 

Thank you,
Wes 

   

Re: Truck size

Brian Kopp
 

Jim Vail did a nice article on building the Rail Line box car (with tips and tricks like relocating the truss rod mount points for truck clearance).
See the May/June 82 Gazette. He too recommended taking the pin off and then using Grandt trucks with a .02" washer to match Kadee 714 coupler height.

Brian Kopp
Jacksonville, FL

Re: Truck size

Dusty
 

I remove the post, locate and mark the center with a pin in a pin vise, drill a #56 hole, tap for 0-80. I prefer nylon screws because they are easy to trim to length. Depending on whose trucks you use you may want to decrease the screw head diameter to enable them to pivot freely. I use a Dremel Mini Mite with a drill chuck tightened gently and a 320 nail board and a wet 600 nail board to finish.

I'm not big on self taping screws but most people use them. If I did use them I would de-bur the hole slightly by spinning a countersink in my fingers before I inserted the screw. I would probably use Armour All or Novus Plastic polish in the hole before I drilled  the hole or 'cut' the threads. OCD perhaps?

Dusty Burman

Track Planning Old School Style PR. 1

NarrowMinded1
 

Hi all,

I posted a video to my YouTube channel explaing how I draw up my track plans using graph paper, a pencil, compass, and a track template. You can view it by clicking the link below. Thanks if you do!

https://youtu.be/x-UoG_fvzJI

--
Nathan Kline
Tiadaghton Valley Railroad & Coal Co.
McConnellsburg, PA
--------------------------------------------------
Web: https://www.tiadaghtonvalleyrr.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TiadaghtonValleyRailroad/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVJMoICFWw9Muse6xm8moiQ

Re: Truck size

 

Dusty - I'd be cautious about using Armour All around models.  There is a good bit of talk on the internet about what's in it and how it acts on plastic and rubber surfaces.  In the hands of a meticulous builder like yourself it's probably harmless and may be useful. 
I survived enough chemistry courses in college to have a reasonable knowledge of the subject.  What I learned leads me to feel that Armour All with it's petroleum distallate content may weaken plastics, especially those that are older and starting to breal down and form micro cracks.  For a long time I suspected it contains silicone, a known source of paint finish problems.  But I found scant support for this fear in what I read.  Given the way Armour All acts on plastic surfaces I'd stay away from using it on a model that had not yet had its finishing and weathering completed. 
When it comes to tapping threads in plastic a dead sharp new tap is your best bet.  The call here is usually a 2-56, the smallest commonly available size at reasonable prices.  Rather than use a cutting fluid on tapping truck mounts in plastic I'd opt for a second pass with a sharp bottoming tap.  This is something you can create yourself from a taper or plug tap with careful use (to not overheat the metal) of a Dremel cutoff wheel.