Date   

Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Eric Schrowang
 

Guys attached are two photos of the plans for the Monero Coaling station Sa Juan Engineering put out in the 70s. If someone would like a copy I would need to have them scanned into a file. Just as a FYI these are in 1/4 inch scale.

Eric 

On Wed, Jan 20, 2021 at 5:52 PM John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
Dusty

Attached are field notes and 1976 photographs of the WP&Y coal shed at Fraser BC.   Not quite what you are asking for, but similar in function and size.  Backside was plain diagonal sheathing.  This shed has concealed the railroad's Fraser toilets for at least  three decades.

I believe this coal shed not only supplied the section house, but also served as an emergency locomotive and rotary supply.  The pipe brackets, of which most are missing, could hold the doors level.   Coal could first be shoveled onto the doors, and then into the tender.  Clearly not suitable for regular use, but doable. 

Similar, but smaller sheds, show up in historic photographs of several other WP&Y section house complexes.

John Stutz
On January 20, 2021 10:29 AM Dusty <dustburm@q.com> wrote:

Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

John Stutz
 

Dusty

Attached are field notes and 1976 photographs of the WP&Y coal shed at Fraser BC.   Not quite what you are asking for, but similar in function and size.  Backside was plain diagonal sheathing.  This shed has concealed the railroad's Fraser toilets for at least  three decades.

I believe this coal shed not only supplied the section house, but also served as an emergency locomotive and rotary supply.  The pipe brackets, of which most are missing, could hold the doors level.   Coal could first be shoveled onto the doors, and then into the tender.  Clearly not suitable for regular use, but doable. 

Similar, but smaller sheds, show up in historic photographs of several other WP&Y section house complexes.

John Stutz

On January 20, 2021 10:29 AM Dusty <dustburm@q.com> wrote:

Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Dusty
 

Something like this but larger. Three or four times larger.

Dusty Burman


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

lloyd lehrer
 

Dusty, you mean like the coal pockets at vance jctn?

lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097

On Wed, Jan 20, 2021, 10:29 AM Dusty <Dustburm@q.com> wrote:
Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


--
lloyd lehrer


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Eric Schrowang
 

Dusty,
I have San Juan Engineering plans for the D&RG coal tower. They are in O scale and I would need to have them scanned to a file. Let me know if these work for you.

Eric

On Wed, Jan 20, 2021, 13:29 Dusty <Dustburm@q.com> wrote:
Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Dusty
 

Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Mark Lewis
 

Scott,

What a GREAT story!
Thank you for sharing....

Mark Lewis
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.


On Tue, Jan 19, 2021 at 6:43 PM Scott McLeod <rgsmodeler@...> wrote:

How does a 16 year-old from the Twin-Cities in Minnesota discover HOn3?  The beginning part of my train story is probably vert similar to many on this list.  I’ll bet the ending is pretty unique however.

 

My first exposure to trains was my mother taking me as a 4 year-old in 1961 on the NP passenger train between St. Paul and Minneapolis.  I have pictures of her and I as we await the passenger train to leave the St. Paul Union depot.  All I really remember was that everything was really big!  The buildings, the green trains and the men working.  I must have had fun because I’ve got a big smile in all the pictures.

 

My first exposure to model trains was as a 12 year-old back in the late 1960s when my father and mother gave me a HO Tyco Train Set for Christmas.  That led to the purchase of a couple of HO Rivarossi steam locomotives over the next couple of years.  I learned that model trains were expensive!  My limited budget was quickly redirected at building military models.

 

I also had a couple of relatives that worked for the Great Northern Railroad.

 

One worked as a machinist at the GN Dale Street Shops which was about a half a mile from where I grew up.  I never had the nerve to ask my uncle to see inside the massive buildings.  I wish I had, but what does a youngster know?  Anyways I got to see numerous GN locomotives every time I walked by the large complex.

 

The other worked at the GN Jackson Street Yard which was about two miles from where I lived.  Somehow I got to ride in a SW1500 switcher as the switch crew classified in the yard.  What I remember is some talk going on between my uncle and the engineer about avoiding ‘The Yardmaster’.  The other was looking through the cab window and seeing nothing but the ends of boxcars as we banged about the yard.  That was fun none-the-less.  I briefly remember meeting crews in the Yard Office.

 

As a teenager, trains were stored away in a box as my interests were more on chasing girls and sports.

 

As a 16 year-old, I was dating a girl and after about 6 months of dating, on one of my visits to her home I asked her why her dad never came out of the basement when I visited?  She responded with ‘Oh, he’s down there playing with his trains’.  I said ‘I’ll be right back’ and headed down to the basement to see what that was all about.  I get down there and sure enough, he has a model railroad in his basement and he’s working away at it.  Immediately I recognized him from one of my trips to one of the local hobby shops in St. Paul and say ‘Hey, you’re the guy from the hobby shop’.  ‘Yes’ he acknowledged.  It turns out I had earlier visited ‘John’s Train Shop’ in St. Paul hoping to find some military models.  There were only a couple of military kits, but tons and tons of trains.  On his model railroad were plenty of familiar railroads represented with the primary one being the Great Northern.  As I looked about, pretty soon I discovered some much smaller trains on smaller tracks lettered for the Deerwood Tomah & Ironton which I had never heard of.  He explains that they are narrow gauge trains and that they are lettered for his private railroad and that the real ones come from Colorado, Pennsylvania and Alaska.  Wow doesn’t that sound exotic I thought.  After looking them over for a while, I exclaim that I liked these ones the best.  What I liked was a D&RGW K-27 and K-28 circa mid-60s PFM jobs.

 

I’ll turn the clock ahead 3 years and low and behold that girl, who was my high school sweetheart and I were married.  My first Christmas gift from my father-in-law was a copy of Mallory Hope Farrell’s ‘Silver San Juan’.  That was that, the narrow gauge bug had bitten and the RGS it was!  I’ve been a modeler of the RGS and the D&RGW since 1977.  I was able to enjoy building three different HOn3 layouts, one at his home and two at my home with my now late father-in-law who passed away in 1995.  In the early 1980s, he introduced me to the narrow gauge club here in the Twin Cities named ‘Twin Cities Narrow Gaugers’ (we hosted the 2018 National Narrow Gauge convention here in the Twin Cities).  I met a number of people that were real nice and turned into life long friends.  Since his passing, and now 43 years later, I’m now on my third and final layout of the RGS.  I’ve never tired of narrow gauge and all of the neat stuff!

 

Scott McLeod

HOn3 RGS/D&RGW Ridgway - Durango

 

 


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Scott McLeod
 

How does a 16 year-old from the Twin-Cities in Minnesota discover HOn3?  The beginning part of my train story is probably vert similar to many on this list.  I’ll bet the ending is pretty unique however.

 

My first exposure to trains was my mother taking me as a 4 year-old in 1961 on the NP passenger train between St. Paul and Minneapolis.  I have pictures of her and I as we await the passenger train to leave the St. Paul Union depot.  All I really remember was that everything was really big!  The buildings, the green trains and the men working.  I must have had fun because I’ve got a big smile in all the pictures.

 

My first exposure to model trains was as a 12 year-old back in the late 1960s when my father and mother gave me a HO Tyco Train Set for Christmas.  That led to the purchase of a couple of HO Rivarossi steam locomotives over the next couple of years.  I learned that model trains were expensive!  My limited budget was quickly redirected at building military models.

 

I also had a couple of relatives that worked for the Great Northern Railroad.

 

One worked as a machinist at the GN Dale Street Shops which was about a half a mile from where I grew up.  I never had the nerve to ask my uncle to see inside the massive buildings.  I wish I had, but what does a youngster know?  Anyways I got to see numerous GN locomotives every time I walked by the large complex.

 

The other worked at the GN Jackson Street Yard which was about two miles from where I lived.  Somehow I got to ride in a SW1500 switcher as the switch crew classified in the yard.  What I remember is some talk going on between my uncle and the engineer about avoiding ‘The Yardmaster’.  The other was looking through the cab window and seeing nothing but the ends of boxcars as we banged about the yard.  That was fun none-the-less.  I briefly remember meeting crews in the Yard Office.

 

As a teenager, trains were stored away in a box as my interests were more on chasing girls and sports.

 

As a 16 year-old, I was dating a girl and after about 6 months of dating, on one of my visits to her home I asked her why her dad never came out of the basement when I visited?  She responded with ‘Oh, he’s down there playing with his trains’.  I said ‘I’ll be right back’ and headed down to the basement to see what that was all about.  I get down there and sure enough, he has a model railroad in his basement and he’s working away at it.  Immediately I recognized him from one of my trips to one of the local hobby shops in St. Paul and say ‘Hey, you’re the guy from the hobby shop’.  ‘Yes’ he acknowledged.  It turns out I had earlier visited ‘John’s Train Shop’ in St. Paul hoping to find some military models.  There were only a couple of military kits, but tons and tons of trains.  On his model railroad were plenty of familiar railroads represented with the primary one being the Great Northern.  As I looked about, pretty soon I discovered some much smaller trains on smaller tracks lettered for the Deerwood Tomah & Ironton which I had never heard of.  He explains that they are narrow gauge trains and that they are lettered for his private railroad and that the real ones come from Colorado, Pennsylvania and Alaska.  Wow doesn’t that sound exotic I thought.  After looking them over for a while, I exclaim that I liked these ones the best.  What I liked was a D&RGW K-27 and K-28 circa mid-60s PFM jobs.

 

I’ll turn the clock ahead 3 years and low and behold that girl, who was my high school sweetheart and I were married.  My first Christmas gift from my father-in-law was a copy of Mallory Hope Farrell’s ‘Silver San Juan’.  That was that, the narrow gauge bug had bitten and the RGS it was!  I’ve been a modeler of the RGS and the D&RGW since 1977.  I was able to enjoy building three different HOn3 layouts, one at his home and two at my home with my now late father-in-law who passed away in 1995.  In the early 1980s, he introduced me to the narrow gauge club here in the Twin Cities named ‘Twin Cities Narrow Gaugers’ (we hosted the 2018 National Narrow Gauge convention here in the Twin Cities).  I met a number of people that were real nice and turned into life long friends.  Since his passing, and now 43 years later, I’m now on my third and final layout of the RGS.  I’ve never tired of narrow gauge and all of the neat stuff!

 

Scott McLeod

HOn3 RGS/D&RGW Ridgway - Durango

 

 


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Curtis Brookshire
 

Craig, I wish you well with your presentation. By the time the group is finished, you'll have a mountain (HO scale of course) of data to parse. To answer your questions:

1. I like to say that I've loved trains since I was old enough to say "choo choo". Got Lionel trains for Christmas when I was 3 (1961), first HO scale set when I was 9. HOn3 was not a direct path though. I lived in Northern NJ until the summer before my senior year of high school and saw a lot of GG1s on the PRR/PC as well as Erie-Lackawanna local freights and commuter trains, so that area is what I originally chose to model. My introduction to Narrow Gauge came just before I turned 5. I made my acquaintance with Tweetsie Railroad in 1963. I was instantly entranced by a real live steam locomotive, especially the Walshearts valve gear. I still enjoy watching the eccentric crank chasing the main rod in its perpetual dance. Our ticket stubs told the story of a narrow gauge that ran between Boone NC and Johnson City TN that was washed away by the (1940) flood and saved for us to ride again. So I've always had a special place for the ET&WNC and the Blue Ridge Mountains. The high point of many summer vacations to North Carolina was the train ride near Blowing Rock, even after I outgrew the Western show. I wanted to learn more about the ET but didn't know where to begin. I joined the Army right out of high school and served 22 years. After a tour in Germany, I reenlisted for a new occupational speciality, training at Lowry Air Force Base, located in Denver. I volunteered at the Colorado Railroad Museum and found a much larger narrow gauge world. I discovered books that covered the ET&WNC giving me a first glimpse into the real railroad behind the Tweetsie nickname. I also discovered HOn3 at the Aurora location of Pro Custom Hobbies. I seriously considered a brass 346, which I had the pleasure of operating at the CRRM and the RGS caboose 0404, which I slept in during steam-up weekends that summer. Never got the 346, but still have (unbuilt of course) the E&B valley 0404. I didn't get into HOn3 then because as a single enlisted man, I lived in the barracks where space was at at premium. I was able to find local model RR clubs in Virginia, California and Maryland, but they were always standard, oops I mean broad gauge. I visited Tweetsie for the first time in several years in 1980, met Master Mechanic Frank Coffey who restored the locomotives used at the park and taught a new generation how to maintain steam. I also purchased a copy of Mal Ferrell's Tweetsie Country, which became my "bible" of information of the ET for almost 10 years. Right after I arrived in Italy came what I call the landmark July 1981 issue of Model Railroader which highlighted narrow gauge and featured the ET&WNC as "A Railroad You Can Model" including plans for an ET&WNC freight. This issue also caught the interest of two Missourians: John Waite who founded the current ET&WNCRR Historical Society and Dean Smith who is a world-class modeler and who built a comprehensive ET&WNC layout as there exists in his basement. Two years later MR published a series on a Malcolm Furlow designed project HOn3 layout that was 8'x10', designed to be movable called the San Juan Central. Around the same time the Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette published a series of articles about building the ET&WNC freight cars from the July 81 MR. I was paying attention, but still not committed because - no layout possibilities. After years of trying, I finally got stationed at Lowry AFB in 1990. The Denver area housing market was about to rise from the trough it had been since the oil glut of the 1980s and I was able to buy a small house with a basement. God has a sense of humor and just a year after I got to Colorado and after being told "buy a house - you'll be here for a while", Lowry came up on the 1991 Base Closure List. So after some consideration as to what to build in the basement, I decided to jump into HOn3 and use the San Juan Central track plan and adapt it to the ET&WNC. The MR series was a comprehensive "how to" and included everything from benchwork to scenery. The layout survived two moves and I recycled some lumber into my current layout. A challenge in 1990 was equipment as there were no ET prototype models yet available in HO scale. Power and rolling stock would have to be adapted, a story I'm sure many who model outside the narrow gauge mainstream have to do. I bought a RGS 20 at the NNGC in Colorado Springs and a friend of mine refused to let me desecrate a factory painted engine so he traded me an older tender-drive RGS 20 which we modified into ET&WNC first 8. I acquired a RGS 42 which I still plan to convert into an ET #4. The motor is bad, so I have to repower so it waits. What I really wanted was the ET&WNC's signature power: cap stacked Baldwin 4-6-0s. It would be a long wait, I saga I can tell if anyone's interested. It would not be until 2009 and a lot of work by Johnny Graybeal and a deal with Train and Trooper owners Matt and Martha that we got our ET&WNC 4-6-0s. I currently live in Eastern North Carolina (where we have no basements) and am working on an ET layout in an 11'x21' "bonus room" above my garage. I do have two Blackstone 2-8-0s but I plan to use the rest of what I have also. I've equipped a couple of my T&T 4-6-0s with Loc sound ECU decoders, which I absolutely love. Gotta build more Fast Tracks switches since the Shinohara switches from the other layout don't play well with my DCC system.

2. I like to operate and something I learned about HO standard, uh BROAD gauge steam is that they don't pull as many cars as their 12" to the foot prototypes. I've always been totally disgusted about how well those darn diesels run and how well they pull. Well narrow gauge trains don't need to be long. A 4-8-4 pulling 8 cars looks kind of odd, but an 8 car narrow gauge train looks just right. ET passenger trains were 2-4 cars long, if they weren't mixed trains. That's the ONE thing.

To add more, I love the fact that you can fit more layout in a smaller space. I'll bet a lot of us wish we had more room, but I'm able to fit a nice layout in the space I have. The ET&WNC features beautiful Blue Ridge Mountain scenery, a large iron mine, logging operations, coal docks and even oil dealers. While I love the EBT, Colorado roads, SPNG and others my heart is in Appalachia. That's probably how I survived living in Colorado without becoming addicted to modeling the Rio Grande/RGS/C&S etc.

3. I'm always looking for new offerings for ET models. HO equipment started appearing shortly after I started by small layout in Colorado. Trout Creek produced ET&WNC gondolas around 1991, Jim King produced resin hopper kits,  David Hoffman offered several ET freight cars using brass castings and wood as well as a conversion kit for the FEBT Laconia Coach. Les Walker produced laser cut models of two ET depots and two engine houses. A Boone depot kit was offered by Chris Jesse and Kingmill Models. More recently we've seen an explosion of 3d printed kits from Western-Rails and new kits of the Cranberry Depot, church and General Store by Carolina Craftsman, as well as wood kits of boxcars, gons and flatcars from Mount Blue.

Best wishes to all. Hope to hear more stories,
Curtis Brookshire
Pine Level NC


Re: Members of HOn3chat that live in the EU

Mark Kasprowicz
 

This is the second time this guy has placed this request on this forum. I replied the first time when we were within the EU offering to help. He was going to check with the German company to see if they'd send to the UK, presumably to forward to the US. I never heard from him again.
Waste of time.

Mark K
Oxon England


Re: Members of HOn3chat that live in the EU

Jim Spencer
 

Very good!


Re: Members of HOn3chat that live in the EU

martin feldwick
 

I live in the UK but in Norfolk  so  dont belong to anyone .😀

On Tue, Jan 19, 2021 at 3:52 PM Mick Moignard <mick@...> wrote:
Dave

I’m in the UK, but that’s not actually EU any longer...

Mick

________________________________
Mick Moignard
m: +44 7774 652504
Skype: mickmoignard

The week may start M,T but it always ends WTF.


Re: Members of HOn3chat that live in the EU

Mick Moignard
 

Dave

I’m in the UK, but that’s not actually EU any longer...

Mick

________________________________
Mick Moignard
m: +44 7774 652504
Skype: mickmoignard

The week may start M,T but it always ends WTF.


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Brian Kopp
 

Craig,
my responses below:

1) My grandfather bought me an HO set in about 1969 when I was 5. I built small 4x8 HO layouts as a boy. Then in college in the fall of 1983 I rode the Cumbres and Toltec. That converted me to Hon3.

2) Being an engineer I love the unique technological ingenuity and achievement in the face of natural and often financial challenges that narrow gauge railroads represent. I also think the precarious center of gravity issues with narrow gauge just look really cool..... =)

3) Cost is the biggest hurdle that I see. Even if you kitbash a used $5 plastic HO box car, the trucks you add are $9 and up, the couplers are $3 and up, and the decals are $6 and up. So a low end rolling stock car cost is still over $20.  Also the absence of HOn3 trainsets (Christmas and otherwise) vs the availability of On30 trainsets keeps kids and younger train enthusiasts interested in narrow gauge from refreshing the HOn3 fan-base.
 
--
Brian Kopp
Jacksonville, FL


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Philip Taylor
 

Craig 

I am primarily an O Scaler who dabbles in other scales.  I started collecting and playing with HOn3 after Blackstone got into the market as prior to that time there was only brass and that needed major work or major money to run right which is similar to the story in HO Standard gauge.  Blackstone ran like Swiss watches out the box and the price was not irrational for what some call “Plastic Brass”. High detail and High Reliability.  Best of both worlds. Prior to Blackstone HOn3 had all the functionality of pre Kato N Scale steam and non of the advantages of HO.  Hence the appeal of Sn3 or On30.

I love what I can fit into an HOn3 layout with both short trains and shorter cars.  

The one thing I am on the lookout for in HOn3 would be Blackstone marking a 4-6-0 similar to the FC&C/RGS/ETWNC locomotives.  Something reliable and DCC friendly.  

Philip Taylor


Re: White pass decals

Robert Bell
 

sure, when I get home from work today...

Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC




On Monday, January 18, 2021, 11:50:01 AM EST, Robert Veefkind via groups.io <snookdust@...> wrote:



Rob Bell   I tried to e mail you but it failed. Can you send me your info on decals and any info on # 70-71    thanks    Bob Veefkind   snookdust@...


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Jack Eyster
 

i started in HO in the mid 70's as a teen as it seemed to be the most common scale.  I recall checking out a book from the library, "Narrow Gauge Nostalgia" by George Turner, and in it there was one narrow gage line that really called out to me, the Diamond & Caldor Ry.  This line was just over 30 miles long and ran 2 and 3 truck Shays.  Up to this point, I really wasn't into steam engines, but once I saw pictures of these Shays, I was obsessed with them and this line.  Back then, we didn't have the internet, so the only reference I had was Narrow Gauge Nostalgia, and El Dorado Narrow Gauge: The Diamond & Caldor Railway by Mallory Hope Ferrell.

What got me into HOn3 was the D&C was narrow gage, and I could still use some of my buildings, details, etc that I already have.

The one thing that I love about HOn3 was the challenge.  Unlike HO, there didn't seem to be much ready to run cars and engines.  Everything for the D&C was going to have to be either scratch built, or modified from existing equipment.

The one thing to watch out for is your track work must be flawless as the lighter, smaller engines and cars are less forgiving. 
 
Jack Eyster 



On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 3:11 PM captaindavekrembs via groups.io <captaindavekrembs=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here in Northern Wisconsin we had the Thunder Lake RR narrow gauge. We have engine #5 and the business coach at the Rhinelnder Museum.

On Monday, January 18, 2021, 10:14:34 AM CST, Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:


I guess mine is the same old story. Always interested in train from as early as I can remember. Then I forgot all about model railroads from about high school until I was in the Army. I was stationed in Colorado Springs and being poor as church mice, for entertainment my wife and I would drive the roads in the mountains behind the Springs. I remarked that they looked like abandoned railroad grades. My wife bought a little booklet on the railroads of Cripple Creek that confirmed I was right. Next thing you know I’m showing up at the local hobby shop, Lemle’s Roundhouse. I still was doing standard gauge until visiting Chama (1971) and riding the Silverton train. The hook was set and after getting out of the Army I converted the little switching layout to narrow gauge and started my narrow gauge empire (that’s a joke) back in Kansas. We spent many summer vacations camping along the Rio Grande Southern when our kids were growing up and if that doesn’t stoke the narrow gauge fires, nothing will. I’ve had many hiatuses through the years as kids and other interests displaced model railroading, but when I retired and moved to a different house, I began working in earnest again.

The thing I like about HOn3 is it has some of the advantages of N scale while still being HO scale and short trains are the norm.  I also like mountain scenery.

The things to look out for are the same as for any scale and gauge, except that you are likely to become a zealot for narrow gauge.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/








Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Ken Vandevoort
 

I believe the first time I saw a real 3 ft. railroad was during a family vacation to Arizona and we came back through Durango.  We didn't ride the Silverton.  My guess is that my parents couldn't afford it.  Another family vacation to Colorado in 1967 two weeks before I left for Air Force basic training took us to Golden and the Colorado Railroad Museum.  I got to see it, bought some souvenirs and even visited with Robert W. Richardson.  We spent a night in Durango and I went trackside when nobody was around and watched one of the last freight trains come in from Alamosa.  My first Air Force assignment after basic was 20 miles outside of Boston.  I was lucky enough to get a roommate who was also a model railroader.  He took me to all the hobby shops in eastern Massachusetts that we could find.  He also took me to Edaville and that was my first narrow gauge train ride.  I believe that I was stationed there when my parents sent me Narrow Gauge in the Rockies for Christmas.  Have you noticed how often that book has come up in these responses?  Years later, I went to grad school in Glendale, Arizona and drove through Durango on the way down.  I only stopped long enough for the McDonalds with a narrow gauge view.  During Easter break in grad school, my roommate and I took a four day trip that included tracing much of the Rio Grande Southern and stops in Silverton and Durango.  Years later, I am married and my wife and I went to the 1990 NMRA national convention in Pittsburgh.  One of the most fun trips was on the East Broad Top and we rode the caboose.  From 2008 to 2018, we lived one block away from the Midwest Central in Mount Pleasant, Iowa.  Where else could you see a West Side Lumber shay go by just by looking out your bedroom window?  I still live in the same county (Henry) and at one time there were three narrow gauge common carrier railroads in this county.

I may have bought my first LaBelle kit while in the Air Force.  Over the years, I acquired more HOn3 kits for the EBT, Colorado roads and probably some others.  The only motive power is a MDC shay.  Not of the kits or the structures have been built.  That is about to change.  I also have left over material from two brick and mortar hobby shops I once owned at different times.  I found some dual gauge track, a dozen pieces of HOn3 flex track, three switches and two dual gauge transition tracks.  I am building a new HO layout in a new house and decided to incorporate HOn3.  It will be point to point with Rico station on one end and Coles station on the other.  I use what I got, so the EBT timber transfer, Saltillo water tank and EBT sanding tower will also be included somewhere.  My HOn3 railroad name will be Day Late and Dollar Short Line.  I bought the lettering decals years ago from Champ.

It is becoming a reality as I have been installing the subroadbed and working on scenery.  I will probably start laying roadbed tomorrow., then track, then wire it and then ballast.  Hopefully I will have something to put on the rails shortly.  I just love the look of those narrow rails.

Ken Vandevoort


Re: White Pass & Yukon decals

Dale Buxton
 

They can be! You just apply the entire CDS sheet to a blank Microscale decal sheet and then overspray them with Microscale clear decal film. Walla! Now you have a decal.

But I hear you. I which CDS had made decals too.

Dale Buxton

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 14:00 Robert Bell via groups.io <ionhoss=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dave,
CDS was a Canadian based company.  CDS closed up shop and retired maybe 15 -20 years ago I think.  It was my understanding that Ozark Miniatures had bought the artwork and rights, but I could be wrong.  I always wished that the artwork for the dry transfers could have been turned into decals.

Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC




On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 09:56:59 AM EST, Climax@... <climax@...> wrote:


In reference to dry transfers, I had heard someplace that the chemicals that are used in them are now on the endangered list, hazardous, or what ever, which has basically stopped production by those who made them.  If they were made in California I can say that for sure as they ban everything from Ketchup to Mustard if someone doesn't like it.
It would stand to reason that items like that could be made where humanity and politicians are not stacked up on top of each other and get yet get the job done with very little harm done to the environment.  I guess I am just an old fuddy-duddy and have more or less ignored those repressive limitations over the last 73 years and am still on my own two feet.
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: "Robert Veefkind via groups.io"
Sent: Jan 17, 2021 9:29 AM
To: hon3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] White Pass & Yukon decals

Thanks Rob   the cds decals dried up and (to me ) are useless. I emailed Republic and no answer yet. Have you ever seen the PFM model of # 70 ?  Thanks esp.John and others for the help   Bob V.
 
In a message dated 1/17/2021 4:41:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, ionhoss=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
 
Ozark Miniatures had the CDS line listed up until about a year or so ago, and the link is still there on their website.  I had ordered several sets from them just a couple of years ago, although they did not keep the line of dry transfers running.  I had assumed that they bought the line of dry transfers.  I attempted to make contact via email about a year ago and never got a response.
 
Republic Locomotive Works has WP&YR decals - only in white - and they ship fast.
 
Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC
 
 
 
On Saturday, January 16, 2021, 04:10:41 PM EST, John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
 
 
Bob
 
CDS Dry Transfers and Robert Sloan Decals were the primary sources of WP&Y lettering.  Both are now long gone, but they occasionally turn up on EBay.
 
Republic Locomotive Works is the only source I know of that currently offers White Pass decals < ">https://www.republiclocomotiveworks.com>.  Republic is basically an N scale narrow gauge supplier, but their decals are available in N, HO, S & O.  This is possibly the widest range of narrow gauge lines currently available, although otherwise often fairly generic.  I believe that these are the Bob Sloan artwork.  See pages 10 & 11 of their listing for White Pass freight, slogans and heralds.
 
A quick scan also finds WestSide, EBT, D&RG, DSP&P, CCR, UPD&G, SR&RL, ET&WNC, OR&W/PRR, generic passenger, Pacific Coast, D&RGW, Mears roads, NCNG, NC&O, Uintah, logging roads, Sumpter Valley, SPNG, Nevada & California, Carson & Colorado, WP&Y, SPC, NPC, North Shore, Gramps tank, Conoco tanck, RGS Goose, D&RGW San Juan train.  Note that their web listing is a bit flaky: you cannot simply go back, but must use their previous, next, or page number links.
 
Labelle also offers freight car decals covering their surprisingly wide range of narrow gauge kits.
 
San Juan Models is mostly Colorado prototype, but also offers a few out of state lines.
 
Not a direct source, but Bill Mosteller of Great Model Railroad Decals < " data-mce-href="https://www.greatdecals.com/>">https://www.greatdecals.com/> has tried to compile a list of all suppliers <https://www.greatdecals.com/Decals.html>.
 
John Stutz
On January 16, 2021 9:02 AM Robert Veefkind via groups.io <snookdust=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
 
 

Are they available for hon3 ? Microscale and Thinfilm do not list them.   Bob veefkind


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

captaindavekrembs
 

Here in Northern Wisconsin we had the Thunder Lake RR narrow gauge. We have engine #5 and the business coach at the Rhinelnder Museum.

On Monday, January 18, 2021, 10:14:34 AM CST, Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:


I guess mine is the same old story. Always interested in train from as early as I can remember. Then I forgot all about model railroads from about high school until I was in the Army. I was stationed in Colorado Springs and being poor as church mice, for entertainment my wife and I would drive the roads in the mountains behind the Springs. I remarked that they looked like abandoned railroad grades. My wife bought a little booklet on the railroads of Cripple Creek that confirmed I was right. Next thing you know I’m showing up at the local hobby shop, Lemle’s Roundhouse. I still was doing standard gauge until visiting Chama (1971) and riding the Silverton train. The hook was set and after getting out of the Army I converted the little switching layout to narrow gauge and started my narrow gauge empire (that’s a joke) back in Kansas. We spent many summer vacations camping along the Rio Grande Southern when our kids were growing up and if that doesn’t stoke the narrow gauge fires, nothing will. I’ve had many hiatuses through the years as kids and other interests displaced model railroading, but when I retired and moved to a different house, I began working in earnest again.

The thing I like about HOn3 is it has some of the advantages of N scale while still being HO scale and short trains are the norm.  I also like mountain scenery.

The things to look out for are the same as for any scale and gauge, except that you are likely to become a zealot for narrow gauge.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/







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