Date   
Re: Westside C-16

Ric Case
 

Bob I have found that replacement trucks ( ie Blackstone)helps to decrease the drag coefficient! 
I can pull 6 to 9 cars with a brass coach! 
Main line is around 2 %steady grade! 
I use all black stone C19 during operations.
Just information!

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Apr 7, 2020, at 8:46 AM, Robert Herrick <rdherrick@...> wrote:

I've refrained from buying brass rolling stock because I am not confident our small brass locomotives can pull them, i.e. I have no practical experience. My eyesight and patience for building kits are not what they used to be and I am eyeing a brass caboose and possibly a brass passenger car. I'll be running very shorts freights and a two-car passenger train behind C-16s and T-12s (both re-motored) respectively, but I still have deep reservations about brass. Your experience and sage advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

Bob Herrick

Re: Westside C-16

Mick Moignard
 

A Westside C-16 will easily pull half a dozen brass cars, probably more, on the flat, but it will help to deal with any resistance issues in the trucks or replace with better trucks. One coach and a brass caboose will not worry it unless their trucks are truly awful.

Mick

________________________________
Mick Moignard
m: +44 7774 652504
Skype: mickmoignard

, so please excuse the typos.

Re: Westside C-16

Mark Kasprowicz
 

I know a few people have substituted the brass trucks and thereby improved the 'rollability' of brass trucks - I've done it too. I know they're like rocking horse shot (ref Mike Conder) but if you can get some Blackstone trucks they will make a huge difference. Also remember that a coating of Bullfrog Snit (ahem!) can significantly improve the pulling power of brass locos.

Mark K

To the Vulture - sorry mate but it gave me  good laugh. We're all in need of as many of those as we can get!

Westside C-16

Robert Herrick
 

I've refrained from buying brass rolling stock because I am not confident our small brass locomotives can pull them, i.e. I have no practical experience. My eyesight and patience for building kits are not what they used to be and I am eyeing a brass caboose and possibly a brass passenger car. I'll be running very shorts freights and a two-car passenger train behind C-16s and T-12s (both re-motored) respectively, but I still have deep reservations about brass. Your experience and sage advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

Bob Herrick

Re: decal help

Mike Conder
 

Oops ... long SHOT, not that other word ... apologies for fat fingers. 

MC

On Mon, Apr 6, 2020 at 2:16 PM Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:
Well, you MIGHT try doing a reverse decal. Paint the area where the lettering is, then print a decal all in black with clear letters.  Success with that will depend on the black of the decal vs. the tender.  I’d make the decal as tall as the tender to eliminate horizontal lines, as the vertical lines would be easier to blend with weathering. 

Long shit but may work. 

Mike Conder

On Mon, Apr 6, 2020 at 2:11 PM brian_budeit via groups.io <brian_budeit=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Building an EBT locomotive, the regular h o scale tender lettering is too large.  Thought it would be simple enough to reduce them and print a new set out on decal paper. Two problems. One, my printer doesn't seem to be able to duplicate the yellow-orange color, it come out reddish pink. Two, color aside, it doesn't print out opaque enough to show up over black.  Could use regular yellow or orange, don't think microscaale offers either one. Any help  or suggestions greatly appreciated.

brian b

Re: decal help

Mike Conder
 

Well, you MIGHT try doing a reverse decal. Paint the area where the lettering is, then print a decal all in black with clear letters.  Success with that will depend on the black of the decal vs. the tender.  I’d make the decal as tall as the tender to eliminate horizontal lines, as the vertical lines would be easier to blend with weathering. 

Long shit but may work. 

Mike Conder

On Mon, Apr 6, 2020 at 2:11 PM brian_budeit via groups.io <brian_budeit=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Building an EBT locomotive, the regular h o scale tender lettering is too large.  Thought it would be simple enough to reduce them and print a new set out on decal paper. Two problems. One, my printer doesn't seem to be able to duplicate the yellow-orange color, it come out reddish pink. Two, color aside, it doesn't print out opaque enough to show up over black.  Could use regular yellow or orange, don't think microscaale offers either one. Any help  or suggestions greatly appreciated.

brian b

decal help

brian_budeit
 

Building an EBT locomotive, the regular h o scale tender lettering is too large.  Thought it would be simple enough to reduce them and print a new set out on decal paper. Two problems. One, my printer doesn't seem to be able to duplicate the yellow-orange color, it come out reddish pink. Two, color aside, it doesn't print out opaque enough to show up over black.  Could use regular yellow or orange, don't think microscaale offers either one. Any help  or suggestions greatly appreciated.

brian b

Re: Static Grass

Mike Conder
 

Mich appreciated, nice job. 

Mike Conder

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020, 4:14 PM Steven Haworth <haworth7@...> wrote:
Nice job, and a great write-up too!  Looks great!

- Steve Haworth
RGS history - http://www.rgsrr.info/
Blog - http://rgsrr.blogspot.com/               FB - https://www.facebook.com/stevesrgs/


On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 4:42 PM Jeff Young <jeff@...> wrote:
Nice work!



FS: B.T.S. McCabe Lumber Co. MoW Speeder

Joseph Melhorn
 

Thinning the herd! B.T.S. #28281-020 - McCabe Lumber Co. MoW Speeder (Hon3) New, unbuilt kit. From the B.T.S. website: The body kit consists of laser-cut basswood, plywood, cardstock, and brass & white metal detail castings. The standard features of B.T.S. kits are there... positionable window sashes, slot and tab construction, brass door knobs, unique character, and well-engineered construction providing fast and easy assembly. And the seats, load, and driver are included! The fully-assembled mechanism is American Made, tested, and ready to run right out of the box. It features a sheet brass frame, lost-wax end beams and steps, can-type motor, and NWSL wheelsets.

Opened only to look at kit. This kit is out of production. Asking $135.00. Shipping from 85629 is extra. PayPal F&F, check or M.O. accepted.  Reply off-list to: toyman@...

Joe Melhorn

Sahuarita, AZ

 

Re: Static Grass

Steven Haworth
 

Nice job, and a great write-up too!  Looks great!

- Steve Haworth
RGS history - http://www.rgsrr.info/
Blog - http://rgsrr.blogspot.com/               FB - https://www.facebook.com/stevesrgs/


On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 4:42 PM Jeff Young <jeff@...> wrote:
Nice work!



Re: Static Grass

Jeff Young
 

Nice work!

Re: Static Grass

Mark Rosche
 

👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

Regards,

Mark

Don‘t take life too seriously...no one gets out alive anyway....

On 5. Apr 2020, at 23:17, Craig Linn <drgw346@...> wrote:



Hey Everyone. 


Like everyone I’m sure...I’ve been spending some time on the layout, working a little scenery. 

I’ve done a little write up on the experience. 

https://www.riogranderr.com/ModelRailroading/Construction/Tips-and-Techniques/Static-Grass/

Now time to make trees!  Need a bunch in the corner area before the siding.

Thanks for reading. 

Craig

Static Grass

Craig Linn
 

Hey Everyone. 


Like everyone I’m sure...I’ve been spending some time on the layout, working a little scenery. 

I’ve done a little write up on the experience. 

https://www.riogranderr.com/ModelRailroading/Construction/Tips-and-Techniques/Static-Grass/

Now time to make trees!  Need a bunch in the corner area before the siding.

Thanks for reading. 

Craig

Re: New Splines

kevin b
 

forgot something.....

some times, you need to attach a block of wood to the grid work before you can attach the riser, due to the grid work itself not being at the same angle as the direction of the track.
hope that makes sense.

Kevin.

Re: New Splines

kevin b
 

this may help:

my way of making splined road bed.

I use luan.
it is 5 mm thick.
basically, it is 1 ply (sorta) plywood.
some people refer to it as door skin.
anyway, I use a table saw.
i set it at 1.5 inches, and rip a sheet of it all the way down.
(rip means to cut long ways) so I end up with a stack of strips 1.5 inches wide and 8 feet long.
ripping strips could also be done with a hand held circular saw.
use a cutting guide for the saw to run against and re set it every cut.
personally I think a table saw is the best way.
anyhow:
after I have a stack of strips, I then cut a few of them up into 1.5 X1.5 pieces.
once I have a paint can full of those, I start making the road bed.
first I establish where I want the road bed.
then I cut a few more strips into whatever length they need to be to make risers that go from the grid work up to the height of the splines.
so now, I have a single strip of luan at elevation and whatever course I want the track to take. winding, straight, curved whatever.
I attach the single strip to the riser with glue and clamps.
next I use glue and clamps and I put a spacer from the paint can every so often. then after that dries, or dry enough to mess with, I attach another 8' strip. then another series of spacers. then a full length strip. and repeat that till I have the width I want.
a sheet of luan (here) is less that 15 dollars.
I can make quite a bit of roadbed from 1 sheet of it.
(i have been known to use my air nailer to put small brads in and or staples, but, you don't really have to)
I want to add this:
I do not hand lay track any more.
I use flex track.
my method, makes it difficult to hand lay track due to the voids between the strips and so on.
if you want to hand lay track, with my spline and spacer method, you could lay a piece of the same luan flat down on top of the splines and hand lay track into that.
as for ballast:
I use wide masking tape and cover the splines.
the ballast does not fall through the tape.

anyway, that's how I do it.

I hope this helps.
thanks.
Kevin.






How do you accurately cut these narrow strips from plywood? I have used a straightedge guide. This must be clamped on to the 4x8 sheet and is slow to use. I have tried edge guides that are attached to the circular saw base, but the edges of the cut are not exactly perfect. Is this how you do it? Also, is there any particular way to cut those nice curved ply roadbed sections? Isn't a lot of plywood wasted between the curves? What particular plywood grade is best? A lot of typical 1/2" 4-ply has voids. Thanks -- John Hutnick

Re: New Splines

John Hutnick
 

How do you accurately cut these narrow strips from plywood?  I have used a straightedge guide.  This must be clamped on to the 4x8 sheet and is slow to use.  I have tried edge guides that are attached to the circular saw base, but the edges of the cut are not exactly perfect.  Is this how you do it?  Also, is there any particular way to cut those nice curved ply roadbed sections?  Isn't a lot of plywood wasted between the curves?  What particular plywood grade is best?  A lot of typical 1/2" 4-ply has voids.  Thanks -- John Hutnick

Re: New Splines

Steve Hatch
 

  Mike I have to think you've never tried my lam method.  Trust me it isn't anywhere near as
difficult to do as ANY of the old methods.  It's simple.  The two lams are already spread out along
the right of way. They are confined by screws in the top of the up right.
  You stand there. Spread glue on both sides of the block.  Smear it with your finger.  Insert it between
the two lams (that are already there and held in place.)  insert the block up snug to the last one
and then stick a clamp on it.  Take a look at the photos I've posted.
   To fool with a nailer or stapler or anything would be a useless waste of time and effort.  Thank you for the
idea but it's been tried and rejected as useless and unnecessary.   
Give it a try and surprise yourself. It's easy and fast and cheap.   The three commandments of model railroading.
Stephen Hatch

Re: New Splines

Steve Hatch
 


 I used 1/2 inch exterior ply for the frame and 2x2 blocks in the corners.
Turnouts are simple.  splice another lam to the side and glue an angled block there and that starts the turnout.
I cut angle blocks for a 6 angle an 8 angle and a 12 angle depending on what turnout I'm going to use there.

here's some more lam done today.   The route is layed out. The grade is a perfect 2 all the way. now just fill in the blocks
Should be done tomorrow some time and start laying ties.

http://www.railwayeng.com/9030railroad/Build/newspline7.jpg
http://www.railwayeng.com/9030railroad/Build/newspline8.jpg
http://www.railwayeng.com/9030railroad/Build/newspline9.jpg
http://www.railwayeng.com/9030railroad/Build/newspline9a.jpg

Stephen Hatch

Re: New Splines

Mike Van Hove
 

Nice work, Steve,

However, I learned a long time ago, I never have enough clamps.  (and, I have quite a lot of clamps.)

A wise man suggested I use the same glue as you are using, but just shoot 2 brads into the glued joint to hold it while the glue dries.   1 brad holds the joint tight, but 2 keeps the joint from racking. 
That way you don’t have to mess with the clamps.
Clamps require at least 3 hands, to hold the joint together, and get the clamp in place, plus tighten the clamp.  And the joint nearly always slips while trying to get the clamp in place.
Don’t ask me how I know this. 🙄

I found the brad nailer really speeds up the process, and at our age, we need all the time we can get, right?

let me know if this works for you.

Mike Van Hove

On Apr 3, 2020, at 11:44 PM, Steve Hatch <hatch@...> wrote:

Over the years I came to realize that screw or nails or any of that wasn't necessary if you
use the right glue.  For these lams, white glue doesn't work but furniture grade aliphatic resin glues
(both the brown and the yellow) , hold for about 150 years so that's good enough for me.
They are right next to the white glues in Home Depot.
  The dark brown aliphatic resin glue is even recommended for  out-door furniture.
So...... I use it and no staples or nails or screws......you just don't need them
I do have an air stapler and brad nailer etc. but they just aren't necessary.
BUT   they must be clamped for maximum holding power.  Also it's best to smear the glue on the whole surface
of the block  to ensure maximum strength contact.  I just use my finger to cover the two faces then insert the block.
Simple quick and dry and holding in about 2 hrs in the winter.
Stephen
Here's the glue I use
www.railwayeng.com/9030railroad/Build/Spline-glue.jpg

Re: New Splines

Steve Hatch
 

Over the years I came to realize that screw or nails or any of that wasn't necessary if you
use the right glue.  For these lams, white glue doesn't work but furniture grade aliphatic resin glues
(both the brown and the yellow) , hold for about 150 years so that's good enough for me.
They are right next to the white glues in Home Depot.
  The dark brown aliphatic resin glue is even recommended for  out-door furniture.
So...... I use it and no staples or nails or screws......you just don't need them
I do have an air stapler and brad nailer etc. but they just aren't necessary.
BUT   they must be clamped for maximum holding power.  Also it's best to smear the glue on the whole surface
of the block  to ensure maximum strength contact.  I just use my finger to cover the two faces then insert the block.
Simple quick and dry and holding in about 2 hrs in the winter.
Stephen
Here's the glue I use
www.railwayeng.com/9030railroad/Build/Spline-glue.jpg