Date   

Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Stephen Silver
 

Thanks everyone.  Seems there is only a limited market for HOn3 roundhouse kits.  I might just wait and see if Clint ever gets the Durango/Gunnison houses available in HO.  I do have the Sargents 3 stall.  It's been built now, it's for the the down mountain interchange of Mellow Gulch.  Silver Creek is the up mountain main yard and facilities for the SC&MG Rwy and 5-7 stalls would give cover to the engines stationed there.


Life is mostly attitude and timing


On Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 06:37:03 AM PST, asandrini <asandrini@...> wrote:


Also I believe that equates to sunroof thickness of a little over 1" thick.  Depending on size of structure, very little roof support is needed.

I scribe down the center and fold over the peak, so the plywood pieces are still connected as one piece.  You can attach roof and run some thin CA on the underside of the peak to prevent it from ever cracking along the scribe.

1/64 ply is sold in 6x9 sheets, but can be purchased in sheets up to 24x48.  


Al



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Russ Norris <rbnorrisjr@...>
Date: 11/12/19 2:14 PM (GMT+00:00)
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Thanks Al.  Very helpful.

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 9:09 AM asandrini <asandrini@...> wrote:
I use 1/64" 3-ply plywood for roofing (cuts easily with Xacto or single edge razor blade). Very strong, no warping. Available from shops that sell R/C planes . They use it for sheeting wings. To add corrugated roofing, you can draw your alignment lines, cover with 3M transfer adhesive and stick roofing to the adhesive and it will never come loose. Also works great for a shingle or tar paper roof.

Al



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Climax@...
Date: 11/12/19 1:30 PM (GMT+00:00)
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Why not use either sheet plastic of the right thickness or even sheet metal for the roofs instead of the card stock ones?
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Ric Case
Sent: Nov 12, 2019 8:05 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

I have found that painting both sides of the roof material helps stop the warping! 

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Nov 12, 2019, at 3:09 AM, Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Update Train-op

Steve Hatch
 
Edited

I made a number of improvements  to my Train-op program.
I put the update zipped file here:

www.railwayeng.com/Train-opZ.zip

It will unzip the program on a windows computer not a Mack
A Simple explanation of the program is here:

www.railwayeng.com/trainopReadMe.txt

Steve Hatch


Re: CMX Products

Russ Norris
 


Mike, here is an alternative.  While I was in Sacramento, I bought an HOn3 brass track cleaner car from Centerline Products.  I actually bought it from Steve at Caboose Hobbies who had a bunch of them running in different scales during the convention.  The car itself is brass and heavy.  There is a slot for a brass cylinder, which you wrap in absorbent material and place in the slot.  The car comes with extra material for wrapping and little tiny rubber bands to hold the wrapping in place.  When I first put it on the tracks, it worked pretty well -- after running a train around the main for a while the wrapping had two black streaks from the gunk it picked up.  But I wasn't 100% satisfied.  The cloth wrapping was hard to keep wound and the rubber banks (the package only included a few) kept breaking. Plus the fact that the clunky brass car didn't quite fit in with my narrow gauge scenery!  So I made a few changes.  I got rid of the rubber bands and secured the cloth wrapper to the cylinder by putting a thin bead of super glue to hold the wrapper in place.  Then I disassembled an HOn3 reefer (Microtrains, I think)  and popped it over the brass track cleaner car.  It fits perfectly!   The car works as intended, cleans the track, and looks like a conventional reefer.  All this for about $75.  I think it's a bargain.  Google Centerline Products.  The HOn3 car doesn't appear on their website, but they carry it.  Give them a call.

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 9:48 AM Mike Smith via Groups.Io <spmike50=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Has anyone tried to convert a CMX Products N scale Brass Track Cleaning car to HOn3?     The standard gauge HO car doesn't convert.  

Thanks,

Mike Smith
Tucson, AZ  


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


CMX Products

Mike Smith
 

Has anyone tried to convert a CMX Products N scale Brass Track Cleaning car to HOn3?     The standard gauge HO car doesn't convert.  

Thanks,

Mike Smith
Tucson, AZ  


Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

asandrini
 

Also I believe that equates to sunroof thickness of a little over 1" thick.  Depending on size of structure, very little roof support is needed.

I scribe down the center and fold over the peak, so the plywood pieces are still connected as one piece.  You can attach roof and run some thin CA on the underside of the peak to prevent it from ever cracking along the scribe.

1/64 ply is sold in 6x9 sheets, but can be purchased in sheets up to 24x48.  


Al



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Russ Norris <rbnorrisjr@...>
Date: 11/12/19 2:14 PM (GMT+00:00)
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Thanks Al.  Very helpful.

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 9:09 AM asandrini <asandrini@...> wrote:
I use 1/64" 3-ply plywood for roofing (cuts easily with Xacto or single edge razor blade). Very strong, no warping. Available from shops that sell R/C planes . They use it for sheeting wings. To add corrugated roofing, you can draw your alignment lines, cover with 3M transfer adhesive and stick roofing to the adhesive and it will never come loose. Also works great for a shingle or tar paper roof.

Al



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Climax@...
Date: 11/12/19 1:30 PM (GMT+00:00)
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Why not use either sheet plastic of the right thickness or even sheet metal for the roofs instead of the card stock ones?
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Ric Case
Sent: Nov 12, 2019 8:05 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

I have found that painting both sides of the roof material helps stop the warping! 

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Nov 12, 2019, at 3:09 AM, Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Russ Norris
 

Thanks Al.  Very helpful.


On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 9:09 AM asandrini <asandrini@...> wrote:
I use 1/64" 3-ply plywood for roofing (cuts easily with Xacto or single edge razor blade). Very strong, no warping. Available from shops that sell R/C planes . They use it for sheeting wings. To add corrugated roofing, you can draw your alignment lines, cover with 3M transfer adhesive and stick roofing to the adhesive and it will never come loose. Also works great for a shingle or tar paper roof.

Al



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Climax@...
Date: 11/12/19 1:30 PM (GMT+00:00)
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Why not use either sheet plastic of the right thickness or even sheet metal for the roofs instead of the card stock ones?
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Ric Case
Sent: Nov 12, 2019 8:05 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

I have found that painting both sides of the roof material helps stop the warping! 

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Nov 12, 2019, at 3:09 AM, Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

asandrini
 

I use 1/64" 3-ply plywood for roofing (cuts easily with Xacto or single edge razor blade). Very strong, no warping. Available from shops that sell R/C planes . They use it for sheeting wings. To add corrugated roofing, you can draw your alignment lines, cover with 3M transfer adhesive and stick roofing to the adhesive and it will never come loose. Also works great for a shingle or tar paper roof.

Al



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Climax@...
Date: 11/12/19 1:30 PM (GMT+00:00)
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Why not use either sheet plastic of the right thickness or even sheet metal for the roofs instead of the card stock ones?
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Ric Case
Sent: Nov 12, 2019 8:05 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

I have found that painting both sides of the roof material helps stop the warping! 

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Nov 12, 2019, at 3:09 AM, Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K


Re: EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

Climax@...
 

I think a lot of us are limited in space to a model of the model of the prototype!
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Russ Norris
Sent: Nov 12, 2019 8:36 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

It is VERY large, especially for modeling purposes.  I made a floor plan for the locomotive and machine shop, then laid the plan over my existing shop complex (much of which was selectively compressed).  The full size locomotive and machine shop covered almost the entire south end of the shops!  That's not counting the car shop which is even bigger, as can be seen from Ric's photo.  My shop scene is 9 feet long and 2-3 feet wide, so it's not small.  I would have loved to have a full size machine shop but there was simply no space for it.  If you have the room I would certainly support it. But many of us are not so fortunate. 

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 8:01 AM Bruce <in2trains@...> wrote:
Ric,

Your photo is inspiring and shows how large the complex is!

Bruce Bowie
Huron Ohio

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 7:55 AM Ric Case <ebtmodeler@...> wrote:



The tracks too the right are for car repair and actual car storage!
The two tracks in the center are for the locomotives repairs.
The car repair shop contained all the wood working tools, all the machines for working on the locomotive and steel cars were located in the left hand side of the structure.
The EBT was a complete entity in its own little place.
My structure when complete will have tracks for all the repairs the railroad will need to do! Well at least look like they could.
Shop cars were used to move deck planks for the flat cars and boxes.
By the twenties most of the wood cars had been faded out of service and the car repair shop was used mainly for storage.
Most of the narrow gauge railroads
Had to be self sufficient in all ways! The EBT built all of their steel hopper and box cars along with the steel flats starting around 1913 ! They purchased the first cars then started building their own.
Just a little bit more information to cloud everyone’s minds.
Enjoy
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694




--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

Russ Norris
 

It is VERY large, especially for modeling purposes.  I made a floor plan for the locomotive and machine shop, then laid the plan over my existing shop complex (much of which was selectively compressed).  The full size locomotive and machine shop covered almost the entire south end of the shops!  That's not counting the car shop which is even bigger, as can be seen from Ric's photo.  My shop scene is 9 feet long and 2-3 feet wide, so it's not small.  I would have loved to have a full size machine shop but there was simply no space for it.  If you have the room I would certainly support it. But many of us are not so fortunate. 


On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 8:01 AM Bruce <in2trains@...> wrote:
Ric,

Your photo is inspiring and shows how large the complex is!

Bruce Bowie
Huron Ohio

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 7:55 AM Ric Case <ebtmodeler@...> wrote:



The tracks too the right are for car repair and actual car storage!
The two tracks in the center are for the locomotives repairs.
The car repair shop contained all the wood working tools, all the machines for working on the locomotive and steel cars were located in the left hand side of the structure.
The EBT was a complete entity in its own little place.
My structure when complete will have tracks for all the repairs the railroad will need to do! Well at least look like they could.
Shop cars were used to move deck planks for the flat cars and boxes.
By the twenties most of the wood cars had been faded out of service and the car repair shop was used mainly for storage.
Most of the narrow gauge railroads
Had to be self sufficient in all ways! The EBT built all of their steel hopper and box cars along with the steel flats starting around 1913 ! They purchased the first cars then started building their own.
Just a little bit more information to cloud everyone’s minds.
Enjoy
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694




--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Climax@...
 

Why not use either sheet plastic of the right thickness or even sheet metal for the roofs instead of the card stock ones?
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Ric Case
Sent: Nov 12, 2019 8:05 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

I have found that painting both sides of the roof material helps stop the warping! 

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Nov 12, 2019, at 3:09 AM, Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K


Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Ric Case
 

I have found that painting both sides of the roof material helps stop the warping! 

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Nov 12, 2019, at 3:09 AM, Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K


Re: EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

Bruce
 

Ric,

Your photo is inspiring and shows how large the complex is!

Bruce Bowie
Huron Ohio

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 7:55 AM Ric Case <ebtmodeler@...> wrote:



The tracks too the right are for car repair and actual car storage!
The two tracks in the center are for the locomotives repairs.
The car repair shop contained all the wood working tools, all the machines for working on the locomotive and steel cars were located in the left hand side of the structure.
The EBT was a complete entity in its own little place.
My structure when complete will have tracks for all the repairs the railroad will need to do! Well at least look like they could.
Shop cars were used to move deck planks for the flat cars and boxes.
By the twenties most of the wood cars had been faded out of service and the car repair shop was used mainly for storage.
Most of the narrow gauge railroads
Had to be self sufficient in all ways! The EBT built all of their steel hopper and box cars along with the steel flats starting around 1913 ! They purchased the first cars then started building their own.
Just a little bit more information to cloud everyone’s minds.
Enjoy
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694




Re: EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

Mark Lewis
 

Rick:

Great looking modeled complex! 👍

Mark Lewis 
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 7:55 AM Ric Case <ebtmodeler@...> wrote:



The tracks too the right are for car repair and actual car storage!
The two tracks in the center are for the locomotives repairs.
The car repair shop contained all the wood working tools, all the machines for working on the locomotive and steel cars were located in the left hand side of the structure.
The EBT was a complete entity in its own little place.
My structure when complete will have tracks for all the repairs the railroad will need to do! Well at least look like they could.
Shop cars were used to move deck planks for the flat cars and boxes.
By the twenties most of the wood cars had been faded out of service and the car repair shop was used mainly for storage.
Most of the narrow gauge railroads
Had to be self sufficient in all ways! The EBT built all of their steel hopper and box cars along with the steel flats starting around 1913 ! They purchased the first cars then started building their own.
Just a little bit more information to cloud everyone’s minds.
Enjoy
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694




EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

Ric Case
 

The tracks too the right are for car repair and actual car storage!
The two tracks in the center are for the locomotives repairs.
The car repair shop contained all the wood working tools, all the machines for working on the locomotive and steel cars were located in the left hand side of the structure.
The EBT was a complete entity in its own little place.
My structure when complete will have tracks for all the repairs the railroad will need to do! Well at least look like they could.
Shop cars were used to move deck planks for the flat cars and boxes.
By the twenties most of the wood cars had been faded out of service and the car repair shop was used mainly for storage.
Most of the narrow gauge railroads
Had to be self sufficient in all ways! The EBT built all of their steel hopper and box cars along with the steel flats starting around 1913 ! They purchased the first cars then started building their own.
Just a little bit more information to cloud everyone’s minds.
Enjoy
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694


Re: Ad: EBT HOn3 Machine and Car/Carpentry Shop Kit

Bruce
 

Thanks for the insight John.


On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 2:14 AM John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:

Bruce

This track served the carpentry shop, which probably predates the predominance of steel rolling stock. The extra narrow gauge track was probably a tram used to move wood car sills, or bundled smaller material, in and out of the shop.  A 4"x 8"x30' car sill runs about 300lbs, so you can see why they would want to move them on a small rail car.  As to where it went, I would expect to find a wood storage/drying shed near the far end.

As to gauge, what was used in the company's coal mines?

John Stutz

On November 4, 2019 at 12:34 PM Bruce <in2trains@...> wrote:

So the group is aware, I have placed a pre-order.  These guys make great kits and I have to believe this one will add to their reputation.  Can't wait for my "Xmas"  present!  Now I just have to let my bride know I am good to go for the holidays.

PS - I am reading Kyper's newest book.  One picture (copy attached) of the south wall of the car shop shows rails running up to the small door between the west and middle doors.  Does anyone know what gauge the rails were and how far south away from the car shop they ran?  Reviewing the car shop floor plan (copy also attached) they appear narrower than 3'.  Maybe 24"??

Thanks.

With cinders in your eyes,
Bruce Bowie
419-602-3584 cell



On Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 10:50 AM NarrowMinded1 < nathan.kline83@...> wrote:
Hi Ric,

Yes, it will be the complete structure; 2 bay loco shop, boiler shop, machine shop, and 3 bay car shop.
--
Nathan Kline
www.nateslightironhobbies.com
www.broadtopmountainmodels.com

 

 


Re: Running DC on a DCC Layout

Dave Trimble
 

FYI, Atlas did market all three. RS locos.

Dave

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 7:25 AM Dave Trimble <dtrimble@...> wrote:
Just search for RS-1, RS-2, Ottawa RS-3 locomotive. I then Went to Wikipedia.

Dave

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 6:51 AM Russ Norris <rbnorrisjr@...> wrote:
Thanks Dave.  The pix of the RS-2 came through fine but the links to the RS-1 and RS-3 were missing.

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 1:32 AM Dave Trimble <dtrimble@...> wrote:
Here’s pictures of RS-1 


And RS-3:


And, for completeness, RS-2


Supposedly the 2 and 3 were nearly identical and more angular than the 1. 

They built 1418 RS-3, 377 RS-2 and 469 RS-1.

Clearly the RS-3 was the most successful.

You can read about them all and their differences in Wikipedia areticals.

Dave

--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: Running DC on a DCC Layout

Dave Trimble
 

Just search for RS-1, RS-2, Ottawa RS-3 locomotive. I then Went to Wikipedia.

Dave

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 6:51 AM Russ Norris <rbnorrisjr@...> wrote:
Thanks Dave.  The pix of the RS-2 came through fine but the links to the RS-1 and RS-3 were missing.

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 1:32 AM Dave Trimble <dtrimble@...> wrote:
Here’s pictures of RS-1 


And RS-3:


And, for completeness, RS-2


Supposedly the 2 and 3 were nearly identical and more angular than the 1. 

They built 1418 RS-3, 377 RS-2 and 469 RS-1.

Clearly the RS-3 was the most successful.

You can read about them all and their differences in Wikipedia areticals.

Dave

--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: Running DC on a DCC Layout

Russ Norris
 

Thanks Dave.  The pix of the RS-2 came through fine but the links to the RS-1 and RS-3 were missing.


On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 1:32 AM Dave Trimble <dtrimble@...> wrote:
Here’s pictures of RS-1 


And RS-3:


And, for completeness, RS-2


Supposedly the 2 and 3 were nearly identical and more angular than the 1. 

They built 1418 RS-3, 377 RS-2 and 469 RS-1.

Clearly the RS-3 was the most successful.

You can read about them all and their differences in Wikipedia areticals.

Dave


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Jeff Young
 

Thanks for the info, Mark.

I’ve got a Sargents kit (with three extra stalls), but getting through Kokomo, Marshall Pass and the Alpine Tunnel to Sargents is going to take me another 10 years or so.  I hope I still remember your advice by then. ;)

Cheers,
Jeff.


On 12 Nov 2019, at 08:09, Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K


Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Mark Kasprowicz
 

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K