Date   

Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

Andrew Thompson
 

Kenji Toma occasionally pops up on the HOn30 group, but I doubt he checks this group.  When I looked at ordering the HOn30 shay, shipping was 2000Yen (about $19).  Shipping is likely to be through DHL, UPS or other similar as Japan Post was not shipping packages out of country.

I believe sales are direct only, at least to outside of Japan.  I haven't seen his products at any sites I've  visited for some time now, but there are probably a lot of shops I'm not aware of.  As for duties, I haven't been charged (so far) for any items from Japan, South Korea or the UK.

Andy


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of kevin b via groups.io <arcatruck13@...>
Sent: Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:25 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?
 
hello all.

first of all, everyone interested in this HOn3 040 loco project, need to click that link and tell TOMA they are interested.
click around a bit and you'll fine the "contact us" thing.
I seriously doubt anybody at toma monitors this forum so, they need to hear from us directly.


as i understand it, the thing will be a kit or at least a partial kit.
i may be wrong, but i don't think it will be a painted RTR model.

3. 
the HON30 loco they sold listed for 16,700 yen.
convert that to US dollars and it's right at 168  bucks.
i take that to mean it's that price from them directly.
so? i dunno about import duties or none of that, nor what shipping might be .
and i reckon, an HOn3 version would likely be a little higher than the HOn30 one they're now sold out of.
my point is, a rough guess that is, one of those in HOn3 would likely cost something in the neighborhood of 200 US dollars.
maybe more, maybe less, but i'd say 200 is a fair estimate.

opinions about that anyone?

4. 
as for me, i do not mind building kits.
personally, i think 200 might be a tick high for an 040 kit.
but, if they make the thing and it's 200, or not WAY over that, i reckon i'll buy one.

does anybody on here have any idea how many he'd need pre sold before he'd undertake this  project?

thanks.
Kevin.







Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

Michaeldlaine@...
 

I have several of Toma’s HOn30 Porters. They run great.  High gear ratio allows them run at a very reasonable speed.  They also have good pickup due to a nice metal weight in the boiler. The superstructure is cast in styrene which is nicely detailed and easy to modify and kitbash.  


A version in HOn3 would be a fine addition to anybody’s roster.  It also opens up the possibility of creating a variety micro layouts representing lumber, mining and other industrial operations.


Re: Creosote stain

dlsprite2003
 

Hi Gents, 
Been to the Denver location Mike mentions, in a roughly 2008-2011 time frame and I just had to get out of the car to pace off and be certain it was a very short section of  3' gauge rails that I had crossed, rail tops barely showing, in the pavement. 
A google search of Denver's Railroads today revealed a c.1929 map with a National Lumber & Creosoting Co. with several parallel tracks on the site.  Location was about 1/4 mile directly east of Utah Jct, and that particular industry trackage was served by the C&S. 
The memory fades, yet, I'd like to think that I also saw a tie treatment facility with a few standard gauge tracks entering the end of a long structure there... possibly still in operation.   
have fun, 
Dave Spritke       

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 11:30 PM Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:
I thought there was a tie plant on the west side of North Yard in Denver, served internally by a 3' gauge line.  IIRC a small section of the 3' is still in the asphalt where it crossed a street ... or was there about 10-15 years ago.

Mike Conder

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 8:20 PM Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...> wrote:
The Rio Grande built a creosote tie plant in Alamosa in 1903. It appears on maps of the rail yards at Alamosa after that date. So at least the D&RGW used pickled ties on the narrow gauge lines it had.

Dale Buxton

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 19:05 John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
With the recent discussion of creosote tie stains, I am wondering which, if any, of the NG railroads actually used creosoted ties, or creosoted timber in trestles?  

The White Pass did not, 50 years ago.  In 1976 I found a small tie treating plant at Carcross that used a different preservative process.  That year I hiked about 25 miles of the line, Bennett to Glacier, and retain a strong impression that the ties were much the color of the dust in the ballast.  At that time White Pass ballast was native gravel from an Ice Age glacial out-wash deposit at Log Cabin, and the glacial dust had oxidized to a light, slightly rusty tan.  Over recent decades they have used crushed granite, and that ballast is near white.

Similarly, my impression of the track at Cumbres and Tanglefoot Curve on the D&RGw, in '67, was that the ties were much the color of the local dust. 

Considering documentary sources: the circa 1913 edition of Foster's "Treatise on Wooden Trestle Bridges" suggests that use of creosoted timber in trestles was, in the preceding decade, largely limited to the stringers and floors of ballasted deck trestles.  And at the Bridge & Building Association's 1917 meeting, during discussion of the report on water supply, one railroad's recent use of creosoted timber for new water towers was clearly regarded as innovative.  Despite these indicators, there were a few major roads that had already invested in creosoting plants.  But I suspect that widespread use creosoted ties was a product of the limited supply and increasing wage costs of WW-I.

So I ask: Did the railroads we model actually use creosoted ties and creosoted timber for trestles, in the time frames that we model, or are we simply assuming that they did, because that's what we are accustomed to seeing?

John Stutz


Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

kevin b
 

hello all.

first of all, everyone interested in this HOn3 040 loco project, need to click that link and tell TOMA they are interested.
click around a bit and you'll fine the "contact us" thing.
I seriously doubt anybody at toma monitors this forum so, they need to hear from us directly.


as i understand it, the thing will be a kit or at least a partial kit.
i may be wrong, but i don't think it will be a painted RTR model.

3. 
the HON30 loco they sold listed for 16,700 yen.
convert that to US dollars and it's right at 168  bucks.
i take that to mean it's that price from them directly.
so? i dunno about import duties or none of that, nor what shipping might be .
and i reckon, an HOn3 version would likely be a little higher than the HOn30 one they're now sold out of.
my point is, a rough guess that is, one of those in HOn3 would likely cost something in the neighborhood of 200 US dollars.
maybe more, maybe less, but i'd say 200 is a fair estimate.

opinions about that anyone?

4. 
as for me, i do not mind building kits.
personally, i think 200 might be a tick high for an 040 kit.
but, if they make the thing and it's 200, or not WAY over that, i reckon i'll buy one.

does anybody on here have any idea how many he'd need pre sold before he'd undertake this  project?

thanks.
Kevin.







Re: Creosote stain

Bill Lugg
 

I've been reading the corporate history of the UP, by Maury Klein, and in it he mentions burnettizing (http://cprr.org/Museum/Burnetizing.html) ties as a process that was used during or shortly after the building of the Transcon in an effort to "harden" them.  Is it possible that any of the narrow gauge lines might have used this process in lieu of creosote treatment?

I guess the comments that go with the linked photo might imply not, but it's just a thought...
Bill Lugg

On 10/29/20 12:30 AM, Mike Conder wrote:
I thought there was a tie plant on the west side of North Yard in Denver, served internally by a 3' gauge line. IIRC a small section of the 3' is still in the asphalt where it crossed a street ... or was there about 10-15 years ago.

Mike Conder

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 8:20 PM Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@gmail.com <mailto:dbtuathaddana@gmail.com>> wrote:

The Rio Grande built a creosote tie plant in Alamosa in 1903. It
appears on maps of the rail yards at Alamosa after that date. So
at least the D&RGW used pickled ties on the narrow gauge lines it had.

Dale Buxton

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 19:05 John Stutz <john.stutz@spcrr.org
<mailto:john.stutz@spcrr.org>> wrote:

With the recent discussion of creosote tie stains, I am
wondering which, if any, of the NG railroads actually used
creosoted ties, or creosoted timber in trestles?

The White Pass did not, 50 years ago.  In 1976 I found a small
tie treating plant at Carcross that used a different
preservative process.  That year I hiked about 25 miles of the
line, Bennett to Glacier, and retain a strong impression that
the ties were much the color of the dust in the ballast.  At
that time White Pass ballast was native gravel from an Ice Age
glacial out-wash deposit at Log Cabin, and the glacial dust
had oxidized to a light, slightly rusty tan.  Over recent
decades they have used crushed granite, and that ballast is
near white.

Similarly, my impression of the track at Cumbres and
Tanglefoot Curve on the D&RGw, in '67, was that the ties were
much the color of the local dust.

Considering documentary sources: the circa 1913 edition of
Foster's "Treatise on Wooden Trestle Bridges" suggests that
use of creosoted timber in trestles was, in the preceding
decade, largely limited to the stringers and floors of
ballasted deck trestles.  And at the Bridge & Building
Association's 1917 meeting, during discussion of the report on
water supply, one railroad's recent use of creosoted timber
for new water towers was clearly regarded as innovative. 
Despite these indicators, there were a few major roads that
had already invested in creosoting plants.  But I suspect that
widespread use creosoted ties was a product of the limited
supply and increasing wage costs of WW-I.

So I ask: Did the railroads we model actually use creosoted
ties and creosoted timber for trestles, in the time frames
that we model, or are we simply assuming that they did,
because that's what we are accustomed to seeing?

John Stutz


Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

Andrew Thompson
 

He now has the HOn3 shay kit listed as a future addition. 

Andy


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of martin feldwick <trackpass@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 6:30 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?
 
His 13 tonner shay would be nice in Hon3 and I would be down for one as I believe it would  make a nice Mich cal type .I am making the Hon30 at present .Lets face it any Hon3 loco would be good ,The Shay kit isnt for the faint hearted though  .Its not hard  as such just needs careful assembly as the material is  strong though brittle.
I would certainly be down for a Porter .
Martin

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:25 PM martin feldwick <trackpass@...> wrote:


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:21 PM Brian Booth via groups.io <carcrazy832=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Toma Model Works has been producing some nice HOn30 model locomotives.  A friend has the HOn30 model of a Porter 0-4-0 and says it runs very well with it's preassembled chassis.  I emailed Kenji Toma and asked if there was any possibility of a HOn3 version in the future.  He replied that several had inquired about an HOn3 version and he was considering including HOn3 in a future run.  Does anyone else in this group want such a loco?  Perhaps if others express interest to Toma, that may increase the chances for production of some small HOn3 locos.  Below is the web address for this product which includes photos.

https://tomamw.miiduu.com/0633-hon30-kit-porter-8-ton-0-4-0-locomotive-kit-with-ready-to-run-drive-chassis

I have no connection with Toma Model Works; I'd just like to be able to purchase some of these small engines in HOn3 myself some day.

Brian


Re: Creosote stain

Mike Conder
 

I thought there was a tie plant on the west side of North Yard in Denver, served internally by a 3' gauge line.  IIRC a small section of the 3' is still in the asphalt where it crossed a street ... or was there about 10-15 years ago.

Mike Conder

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 8:20 PM Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...> wrote:
The Rio Grande built a creosote tie plant in Alamosa in 1903. It appears on maps of the rail yards at Alamosa after that date. So at least the D&RGW used pickled ties on the narrow gauge lines it had.

Dale Buxton

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 19:05 John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
With the recent discussion of creosote tie stains, I am wondering which, if any, of the NG railroads actually used creosoted ties, or creosoted timber in trestles?  

The White Pass did not, 50 years ago.  In 1976 I found a small tie treating plant at Carcross that used a different preservative process.  That year I hiked about 25 miles of the line, Bennett to Glacier, and retain a strong impression that the ties were much the color of the dust in the ballast.  At that time White Pass ballast was native gravel from an Ice Age glacial out-wash deposit at Log Cabin, and the glacial dust had oxidized to a light, slightly rusty tan.  Over recent decades they have used crushed granite, and that ballast is near white.

Similarly, my impression of the track at Cumbres and Tanglefoot Curve on the D&RGw, in '67, was that the ties were much the color of the local dust. 

Considering documentary sources: the circa 1913 edition of Foster's "Treatise on Wooden Trestle Bridges" suggests that use of creosoted timber in trestles was, in the preceding decade, largely limited to the stringers and floors of ballasted deck trestles.  And at the Bridge & Building Association's 1917 meeting, during discussion of the report on water supply, one railroad's recent use of creosoted timber for new water towers was clearly regarded as innovative.  Despite these indicators, there were a few major roads that had already invested in creosoting plants.  But I suspect that widespread use creosoted ties was a product of the limited supply and increasing wage costs of WW-I.

So I ask: Did the railroads we model actually use creosoted ties and creosoted timber for trestles, in the time frames that we model, or are we simply assuming that they did, because that's what we are accustomed to seeing?

John Stutz


Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

jczul36
 

Interested


On Oct 28, 2020, at 5:23 PM, Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:


Interested. 

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 6:10 PM captaindavekrembs via groups.io <captaindavekrembs=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have had several Ken Kidder Porters and thee look a world better. Hope they are not "slot racers" and have room for decoders.

On Wednesday, October 28, 2020, 6:38:19 PM CDT, martin feldwick <trackpass@...> wrote:


His 13 tonner shay would be nice in Hon3 and I would be down for one as I believe it would  make a nice Mich cal type .I am making the Hon30 at present .Lets face it any Hon3 loco would be good ,The Shay kit isnt for the faint hearted though  .Its not hard  as such just needs careful assembly as the material is  strong though brittle.
I would certainly be down for a Porter .
Martin

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:25 PM martin feldwick <trackpass@...> wrote:


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:21 PM Brian Booth via groups.io <carcrazy832=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Toma Model Works has been producing some nice HOn30 model locomotives.  A friend has the HOn30 model of a Porter 0-4-0 and says it runs very well with it's preassembled chassis.  I emailed Kenji Toma and asked if there was any possibility of a HOn3 version in the future.  He replied that several had inquired about an HOn3 version and he was considering including HOn3 in a future run.  Does anyone else in this group want such a loco?  Perhaps if others express interest to Toma, that may increase the chances for production of some small HOn3 locos.  Below is the web address for this product which includes photos.

https://tomamw.miiduu.com/0633-hon30-kit-porter-8-ton-0-4-0-locomotive-kit-with-ready-to-run-drive-chassis

I have no connection with Toma Model Works; I'd just like to be able to purchase some of these small engines in HOn3 myself some day.

Brian


Re: Toma 2-truck Shay and 0-4-0 Porter Kits

John Stutz
 

Update

On taking another look at the Shay drive parts, I realized that what I had taken for an open frame motor is actually a coreless motor in a with flywheel in a housing/truck frame.  This suggests that the 0-4-0s also use coreless motors, with much improved low speed performance than is usually obtainable from can motors.

See:  https://tomamw.miiduu.com/1001-hon30-13-ton-shay-chassis-kit-for-t-boiler

John Stutz


Re: Creosote stain

John Stutz
 

Thanks Dale and Ric

I have hiked some bits of the Silverton line, but never paid much attention to the ties.  But we don't, do we, when things are just as we expect them to be? And the one time I got out along the abandoned parts of the EBT, the track was generally hidden in the grass, while I was focused on hunting bridges.

John Stutz

On October 28, 2020 7:20 PM Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...> wrote:


The Rio Grande built a creosote tie plant in Alamosa in 1903. It appears on maps of the rail yards at Alamosa after that date. So at least the D&RGW used pickled ties on the narrow gauge lines it had.

Dale Buxton

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 19:05 John Stutz < john.stutz@...> wrote:
With the recent discussion of creosote tie stains, I am wondering which, if any, of the NG railroads actually used creosoted ties, or creosoted timber in trestles?  

The White Pass did not, 50 years ago.  In 1976 I found a small tie treating plant at Carcross that used a different preservative process.  That year I hiked about 25 miles of the line, Bennett to Glacier, and retain a strong impression that the ties were much the color of the dust in the ballast.  At that time White Pass ballast was native gravel from an Ice Age glacial out-wash deposit at Log Cabin, and the glacial dust had oxidized to a light, slightly rusty tan.  Over recent decades they have used crushed granite, and that ballast is near white.

Similarly, my impression of the track at Cumbres and Tanglefoot Curve on the D&RGw, in '67, was that the ties were much the color of the local dust. 

Considering documentary sources: the circa 1913 edition of Foster's "Treatise on Wooden Trestle Bridges" suggests that use of creosoted timber in trestles was, in the preceding decade, largely limited to the stringers and floors of ballasted deck trestles.  And at the Bridge & Building Association's 1917 meeting, during discussion of the report on water supply, one railroad's recent use of creosoted timber for new water towers was clearly regarded as innovative.  Despite these indicators, there were a few major roads that had already invested in creosoting plants.  But I suspect that widespread use creosoted ties was a product of the limited supply and increasing wage costs of WW-I.

So I ask: Did the railroads we model actually use creosoted ties and creosoted timber for trestles, in the time frames that we model, or are we simply assuming that they did, because that's what we are accustomed to seeing?

John Stutz




Toma 2-truck Shay and 0-4-0 Porter Kits

John Stutz
 

Dave

The O&K 0-4-0Ts, and presumably the Porters aso,  use the Joe Works arrangement with a vertical can motor driving a train of spur gears.  But these gears have much finer teeth than Joe Works used, so give a higher reduction ratio, which slows the locomotives  down. 

The Shay drive drawing shows a tiny open frame motor mounted on the rear truck, driving a line shaft through an approximately 2:1 reduction.  Assuming the common 15:1 near minimal worm reduction, gives 30:1 total, which should provide decent speeds.  For even slower speeds, replace the initial gears with a Nigel Lawton square belt drive, at about 3:1.  Eliminating the high speed gears should be quieter.

In the parts section, Toma is offering 7 & 8mm by 16mm coreless motors, which may be his new standard.  If so, new production should perform better than current.  

The Shay's motor fills the tank, but a small decoder might be put under a large wood pile.  See photos of Sumpter Valley tenders for ideas.  If you enclose the Shay's cab there is plenty of room, even for sound.  It's a T-boiler Shay, so the boiler is needed for weight.  For the Porter, one might get a really small decoder in under the roof.  Slightly dirty windows all round might be needed, but at normal viewing angles a cab roof can hide a lot.

The English language home page indicates that an HOn3 version of the Shay is already planned, but an HOn30 WW&F Forney is next up.  He is also planning a 009 (1/76 scale, 9mm gauge) version of the 13t Shay, which will scale out to about 20t in HO.

John Stutz

On October 28, 2020 5:10 PM captaindavekrembs via groups.io <captaindavekrembs@...> wrote:

I have had several Ken Kidder Porters and thee look a world better. Hope they are not "slot racers" and have room for decoders.
On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:21 PM Brian Booth via groups.io <carcrazy832= yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Toma Model Works has been producing some nice HOn30 model locomotives.  A friend has the HOn30 model of a Porter 0-4-0 and says it runs very well with it's preassembled chassis.  I emailed Kenji Toma and asked if there was any possibility of a HOn3 version in the future.  He replied that several had inquired about an HOn3 version and he was considering including HOn3 in a future run.  Does anyone else in this group want such a loco?  Perhaps if others express interest to Toma, that may increase the chances for production of some small HOn3 locos.  Below is the web address for this product which includes photos.

https://tomamw.miiduu.com/0633-hon30-kit-porter-8-ton-0-4-0-locomotive-kit-with-ready-to-run-drive-chassis

I have no connection with Toma Model Works; I'd just like to be able to purchase some of these small engines in HOn3 myself some day.

Brian


Re: Creosote stain

Ric Case
 

I model the EBT and though the pennsy built a tie treating plant in mt Union in 1908 which lasted till the late 60’s the EBT only used natural ties and spent lots of time replacing ties along the main throughout its history. Most of the ties were cut along the right of the way! 
These ties were also shipped off line to other railroad company’s! 

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Oct 28, 2020, at 9:05 PM, John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:


With the recent discussion of creosote tie stains, I am wondering which, if any, of the NG railroads actually used creosoted ties, or creosoted timber in trestles?  

The White Pass did not, 50 years ago.  In 1976 I found a small tie treating plant at Carcross that used a different preservative process.  That year I hiked about 25 miles of the line, Bennett to Glacier, and retain a strong impression that the ties were much the color of the dust in the ballast.  At that time White Pass ballast was native gravel from an Ice Age glacial out-wash deposit at Log Cabin, and the glacial dust had oxidized to a light, slightly rusty tan.  Over recent decades they have used crushed granite, and that ballast is near white.

Similarly, my impression of the track at Cumbres and Tanglefoot Curve on the D&RGw, in '67, was that the ties were much the color of the local dust. 

Considering documentary sources: the circa 1913 edition of Foster's "Treatise on Wooden Trestle Bridges" suggests that use of creosoted timber in trestles was, in the preceding decade, largely limited to the stringers and floors of ballasted deck trestles.  And at the Bridge & Building Association's 1917 meeting, during discussion of the report on water supply, one railroad's recent use of creosoted timber for new water towers was clearly regarded as innovative.  Despite these indicators, there were a few major roads that had already invested in creosoting plants.  But I suspect that widespread use creosoted ties was a product of the limited supply and increasing wage costs of WW-I.

So I ask: Did the railroads we model actually use creosoted ties and creosoted timber for trestles, in the time frames that we model, or are we simply assuming that they did, because that's what we are accustomed to seeing?

John Stutz


Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

John
 

Me too
John Peckham


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 6:32 PM, Joe Ferguson via groups.io
<jbferg_80@...> wrote:
Interested in both as well. 

Joe

Joe B. Ferguson
 


Re: Creosote stain

Dale Buxton
 

The Rio Grande built a creosote tie plant in Alamosa in 1903. It appears on maps of the rail yards at Alamosa after that date. So at least the D&RGW used pickled ties on the narrow gauge lines it had.

Dale Buxton

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 19:05 John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
With the recent discussion of creosote tie stains, I am wondering which, if any, of the NG railroads actually used creosoted ties, or creosoted timber in trestles?  

The White Pass did not, 50 years ago.  In 1976 I found a small tie treating plant at Carcross that used a different preservative process.  That year I hiked about 25 miles of the line, Bennett to Glacier, and retain a strong impression that the ties were much the color of the dust in the ballast.  At that time White Pass ballast was native gravel from an Ice Age glacial out-wash deposit at Log Cabin, and the glacial dust had oxidized to a light, slightly rusty tan.  Over recent decades they have used crushed granite, and that ballast is near white.

Similarly, my impression of the track at Cumbres and Tanglefoot Curve on the D&RGw, in '67, was that the ties were much the color of the local dust. 

Considering documentary sources: the circa 1913 edition of Foster's "Treatise on Wooden Trestle Bridges" suggests that use of creosoted timber in trestles was, in the preceding decade, largely limited to the stringers and floors of ballasted deck trestles.  And at the Bridge & Building Association's 1917 meeting, during discussion of the report on water supply, one railroad's recent use of creosoted timber for new water towers was clearly regarded as innovative.  Despite these indicators, there were a few major roads that had already invested in creosoting plants.  But I suspect that widespread use creosoted ties was a product of the limited supply and increasing wage costs of WW-I.

So I ask: Did the railroads we model actually use creosoted ties and creosoted timber for trestles, in the time frames that we model, or are we simply assuming that they did, because that's what we are accustomed to seeing?

John Stutz


Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

Joe Ferguson
 

Interested in both as well. 

Joe

Joe B. Ferguson
 _._,_._,_


Re: Creosote stain

John Stutz
 

With the recent discussion of creosote tie stains, I am wondering which, if any, of the NG railroads actually used creosoted ties, or creosoted timber in trestles?  

The White Pass did not, 50 years ago.  In 1976 I found a small tie treating plant at Carcross that used a different preservative process.  That year I hiked about 25 miles of the line, Bennett to Glacier, and retain a strong impression that the ties were much the color of the dust in the ballast.  At that time White Pass ballast was native gravel from an Ice Age glacial out-wash deposit at Log Cabin, and the glacial dust had oxidized to a light, slightly rusty tan.  Over recent decades they have used crushed granite, and that ballast is near white.

Similarly, my impression of the track at Cumbres and Tanglefoot Curve on the D&RGw, in '67, was that the ties were much the color of the local dust. 

Considering documentary sources: the circa 1913 edition of Foster's "Treatise on Wooden Trestle Bridges" suggests that use of creosoted timber in trestles was, in the preceding decade, largely limited to the stringers and floors of ballasted deck trestles.  And at the Bridge & Building Association's 1917 meeting, during discussion of the report on water supply, one railroad's recent use of creosoted timber for new water towers was clearly regarded as innovative.  Despite these indicators, there were a few major roads that had already invested in creosoting plants.  But I suspect that widespread use creosoted ties was a product of the limited supply and increasing wage costs of WW-I.

So I ask: Did the railroads we model actually use creosoted ties and creosoted timber for trestles, in the time frames that we model, or are we simply assuming that they did, because that's what we are accustomed to seeing?

John Stutz


Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

Gary Crawford
 

Interested, either the porter or shay, keep us posted!


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020, 8:23 PM Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:
Interested. 

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 6:10 PM captaindavekrembs via groups.io <captaindavekrembs=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have had several Ken Kidder Porters and thee look a world better. Hope they are not "slot racers" and have room for decoders.

On Wednesday, October 28, 2020, 6:38:19 PM CDT, martin feldwick <trackpass@...> wrote:


His 13 tonner shay would be nice in Hon3 and I would be down for one as I believe it would  make a nice Mich cal type .I am making the Hon30 at present .Lets face it any Hon3 loco would be good ,The Shay kit isnt for the faint hearted though  .Its not hard  as such just needs careful assembly as the material is  strong though brittle.
I would certainly be down for a Porter .
Martin

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:25 PM martin feldwick <trackpass@...> wrote:


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:21 PM Brian Booth via groups.io <carcrazy832=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Toma Model Works has been producing some nice HOn30 model locomotives.  A friend has the HOn30 model of a Porter 0-4-0 and says it runs very well with it's preassembled chassis.  I emailed Kenji Toma and asked if there was any possibility of a HOn3 version in the future.  He replied that several had inquired about an HOn3 version and he was considering including HOn3 in a future run.  Does anyone else in this group want such a loco?  Perhaps if others express interest to Toma, that may increase the chances for production of some small HOn3 locos.  Below is the web address for this product which includes photos.

https://tomamw.miiduu.com/0633-hon30-kit-porter-8-ton-0-4-0-locomotive-kit-with-ready-to-run-drive-chassis

I have no connection with Toma Model Works; I'd just like to be able to purchase some of these small engines in HOn3 myself some day.

Brian


Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

Mike Conder
 

Interested. 

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 6:10 PM captaindavekrembs via groups.io <captaindavekrembs=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have had several Ken Kidder Porters and thee look a world better. Hope they are not "slot racers" and have room for decoders.

On Wednesday, October 28, 2020, 6:38:19 PM CDT, martin feldwick <trackpass@...> wrote:


His 13 tonner shay would be nice in Hon3 and I would be down for one as I believe it would  make a nice Mich cal type .I am making the Hon30 at present .Lets face it any Hon3 loco would be good ,The Shay kit isnt for the faint hearted though  .Its not hard  as such just needs careful assembly as the material is  strong though brittle.
I would certainly be down for a Porter .
Martin

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:25 PM martin feldwick <trackpass@...> wrote:


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:21 PM Brian Booth via groups.io <carcrazy832=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Toma Model Works has been producing some nice HOn30 model locomotives.  A friend has the HOn30 model of a Porter 0-4-0 and says it runs very well with it's preassembled chassis.  I emailed Kenji Toma and asked if there was any possibility of a HOn3 version in the future.  He replied that several had inquired about an HOn3 version and he was considering including HOn3 in a future run.  Does anyone else in this group want such a loco?  Perhaps if others express interest to Toma, that may increase the chances for production of some small HOn3 locos.  Below is the web address for this product which includes photos.

https://tomamw.miiduu.com/0633-hon30-kit-porter-8-ton-0-4-0-locomotive-kit-with-ready-to-run-drive-chassis

I have no connection with Toma Model Works; I'd just like to be able to purchase some of these small engines in HOn3 myself some day.

Brian


Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

captaindavekrembs
 

I have had several Ken Kidder Porters and thee look a world better. Hope they are not "slot racers" and have room for decoders.

On Wednesday, October 28, 2020, 6:38:19 PM CDT, martin feldwick <trackpass@...> wrote:


His 13 tonner shay would be nice in Hon3 and I would be down for one as I believe it would  make a nice Mich cal type .I am making the Hon30 at present .Lets face it any Hon3 loco would be good ,The Shay kit isnt for the faint hearted though  .Its not hard  as such just needs careful assembly as the material is  strong though brittle.
I would certainly be down for a Porter .
Martin

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:25 PM martin feldwick <trackpass@...> wrote:


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:21 PM Brian Booth via groups.io <carcrazy832=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Toma Model Works has been producing some nice HOn30 model locomotives.  A friend has the HOn30 model of a Porter 0-4-0 and says it runs very well with it's preassembled chassis.  I emailed Kenji Toma and asked if there was any possibility of a HOn3 version in the future.  He replied that several had inquired about an HOn3 version and he was considering including HOn3 in a future run.  Does anyone else in this group want such a loco?  Perhaps if others express interest to Toma, that may increase the chances for production of some small HOn3 locos.  Below is the web address for this product which includes photos.

https://tomamw.miiduu.com/0633-hon30-kit-porter-8-ton-0-4-0-locomotive-kit-with-ready-to-run-drive-chassis

I have no connection with Toma Model Works; I'd just like to be able to purchase some of these small engines in HOn3 myself some day.

Brian


Re: Would anyone like a 0-4-0 Porter in HOn3?

martin feldwick
 

His 13 tonner shay would be nice in Hon3 and I would be down for one as I believe it would  make a nice Mich cal type .I am making the Hon30 at present .Lets face it any Hon3 loco would be good ,The Shay kit isnt for the faint hearted though  .Its not hard  as such just needs careful assembly as the material is  strong though brittle.
I would certainly be down for a Porter .
Martin

On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:25 PM martin feldwick <trackpass@...> wrote:


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 10:21 PM Brian Booth via groups.io <carcrazy832=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Toma Model Works has been producing some nice HOn30 model locomotives.  A friend has the HOn30 model of a Porter 0-4-0 and says it runs very well with it's preassembled chassis.  I emailed Kenji Toma and asked if there was any possibility of a HOn3 version in the future.  He replied that several had inquired about an HOn3 version and he was considering including HOn3 in a future run.  Does anyone else in this group want such a loco?  Perhaps if others express interest to Toma, that may increase the chances for production of some small HOn3 locos.  Below is the web address for this product which includes photos.

https://tomamw.miiduu.com/0633-hon30-kit-porter-8-ton-0-4-0-locomotive-kit-with-ready-to-run-drive-chassis

I have no connection with Toma Model Works; I'd just like to be able to purchase some of these small engines in HOn3 myself some day.

Brian

2281 - 2300 of 9022