Date   

Re: ME rail

Eric Schrowang
 

Very odd, I have 2 bundles of ME code 70 rail that has been around for quite a number of years and has not tarnished.

Eric

On Sat, Oct 16, 2021, 11:16 PM Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:
Bizarre. I’ve never had that experience.

On Oct 16, 2021, at 7:22 PM, alsands@... wrote:

Thanks for your replies,, I am using ME flex, some standard gauge, some narrow gauge, some dual gauge, some weathered most not, none of the track is glued down, all is nailed to blue foam.
By tarnishing I mean the rail is going dark brown to black, but only the ME track not the Peco.

Alan


Re: ME rail

Jim Marlett
 

Bizarre. I’ve never had that experience.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Oct 16, 2021, at 7:22 PM, alsands@... wrote:

Thanks for your replies,, I am using ME flex, some standard gauge, some narrow gauge, some dual gauge, some weathered most not, none of the track is glued down, all is nailed to blue foam.
By tarnishing I mean the rail is going dark brown to black, but only the ME track not the Peco.

Alan


Re: Hand laying track

Andrew Thompson
 

If you want to include tie plates with your hand laid track, you might want to check the Proto 87 website.  Tie plates are at http://www.proto87.com/product1907.html.  I haven't used them yet, but am considering them for a future project.

Andy
THE PROTO:87 SIG AND HO STORES 1996 to 2021 Engineering better products. Est. 1996. 25 Years of the Most Advanced Engineering Parts and Systems for Working Scale Models and Scale Track.
www.proto87.com


Re: ME rail

alsands@...
 

Thanks for your replies,, I am using ME flex, some standard gauge, some narrow gauge, some dual gauge, some weathered most not, none of the track is glued down, all is nailed to blue foam.
By tarnishing I mean the rail is going dark brown to black, but only the ME track not the Peco.

Alan


Re: ME rail

Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...>
 

You should be using a product that is made "down-under" called "INOX". It's an electrical conductive lubricant that if used as directed creates an oxidation barrier on your ME Nickel-Silver rail.

Dale Buxton 

On Sat, Oct 16, 2021 at 2:21 AM <alsands@...> wrote:
Hi all, I am having trouble with my ME rail tarnishing, the Peco rail stays clean, we live in a relatively hot part of Australia (Perth) but we don't suffer with humidity.
The rail will tarnish within a couple of weeks.
Any hints would help.
Thanks
Alan Sandsrule


Re: Telluride

Seb J
 

Jeff,

Yes this is Telluride, with a few changes from how it really was in my 1941 time frame. I wanted to keep a small engine house for operations and fun, and had to swap a couple of switches to get enough length for the curves in and out of the team track north of the depot.

Also had to bend the mainline 90 degrees to the right to go along my wall, thus the sidings east of the depot are a bit modified also, but will serve the same industries.

The temporary second hand backdrops are a good upgrade from the flowers wallpaper also 😄

Nice job on the code 40. I might do that for the engine house tracks. They are temporary for now until I decide what to do.
I was disappointed with the ME code 40 flextrack I had bought for those. The ties are much shorter than on their cd55 track. The look is not really great...






Le jeu. 14 oct. 2021 à 00:48, Jeff Reynolds <jefe4x4@...> a écrit :
Seb, It looks like Telluride to me. That's code 40 on the house trk @ Telluride.

--
Cordialement

Sébastien Jubault
Vice-Président
AECFM - Chemin de Fer de Rillé
www.aecfm.fr


Re: ME rail

Jim Marlett
 

I’m not sure what you mean by tarnish. Are you having troubles with conducting electricity from rail to wheel?

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Oct 16, 2021, at 3:21 AM, alsands@... wrote:

Hi all, I am having trouble with my ME rail tarnishing, the Peco rail stays clean, we live in a relatively hot part of Australia (Perth) but we don't suffer with humidity.
The rail will tarnish within a couple of weeks.
Any hints would help.
Thanks
Alan Sandsrule


Re: Hand laying track

Mike Van Hove
 

I won’t be using Switch machines, all will be controlled with Caboose Industries Ground Throws, and Tam Valley Electrical gizmos. (KISS)

I have no plans for deep scenery so the modules will be only 3” deep. 1/2” homesote 1-1/2” pink foam and 1” open on the bottom for the wiring and foam support bracing.

Should be very light weight. I plan on installing the modules and that’s that. No plans to haul them around to shows. Maybe no scenery, who knows?

I do have a lot of structures already built so I may set them on the layout, just for fun.

The main idea is to run my 3 Blackstone engines and my 1 Westside T-12, and do some switching. That’s all.

Thanks for all your advice

Mike Van Hove


Re: ME rail

Nigel Phillips
 

Hi Alan,

When you say tarnishing is this a yellowing? Are you referring to unlaid track or laid track? If laid did you use PVA glue? If so was the PVA low acidity? If yes to the last it's probably due to acetic acid vapor being released from the PVA.

Nickel silver usually has a slight yellow tint to it due to normal oxidation (it's a brass alloy that does not contain silver). It gets yellower with time if not cleaned. Different track manufacturers use different alloy mixes. I have some old (probably 30 years) flex track unused that is now quite yellow.

Nigel


On Sat, Oct 16, 2021 at 4:21 AM <alsands@...> wrote:
Hi all, I am having trouble with my ME rail tarnishing, the Peco rail stays clean, we live in a relatively hot part of Australia (Perth) but we don't suffer with humidity.
The rail will tarnish within a couple of weeks.
Any hints would help.
Thanks
Alan Sandsrule


ME rail

alsands@...
 

Hi all, I am having trouble with my ME rail tarnishing, the Peco rail stays clean, we live in a relatively hot part of Australia (Perth) but we don't suffer with humidity.
The rail will tarnish within a couple of weeks.
Any hints would help.
Thanks
Alan Sandsrule


Re: Hand laying track

Rio Grande
 

I guess I'll paint the rail before I lay it. Thank you for the feedback.


Re: Hand laying track

Jim Marlett
 

I suggest that you not apply rail weathering solution to rail that is already in place. I discovered the hard way that it keeps working unless it can be completely removed. It rusts the spikes and leaves a white residue on ties and ballast eventually.


On Oct 15, 2021, at 8:20 PM, threefootmodels via groups.io <threefootmodels@...> wrote:

I wasnt really expecting this topic to take off like it did but every post is informative for me and I appreciate the responses. For now my concern is loosing spike and tie plate detail from the flex track. If some one of you could post some close up pics of your track work I'd love to see it, but deffinetly for now I am going to lay a turnout and some track to see how it goes. 

Have any of you guys used ME rail weathering solution? does it work in solder joints? 


Re: Hand laying track

Rio Grande
 

I wasnt really expecting this topic to take off like it did but every post is informative for me and I appreciate the responses. For now my concern is loosing spike and tie plate detail from the flex track. If some one of you could post some close up pics of your track work I'd love to see it, but deffinetly for now I am going to lay a turnout and some track to see how it goes. 

Have any of you guys used ME rail weathering solution? does it work in solder joints? 


Re: Hand laying track

Jim Marlett
 

I agree that roller gauges are great for laying rail, but you really do need an NMRA gauge on turnouts.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


Re: Hand laying track

Alan Kilby
 

 I much prefer and use roller gauges or 3 point wherever possible,there much easier to work with especially with dual gauge turnouts.
 There's a few places in turnouts I use nmra gauge ,top of frog point is solid as a result my rollee gauges will not fit over rails at point and won't fit over point and stockrail where they contact.I like to check gauge throughout frog to avoid wheel drop or climbing frog which Roller gauges do not allow me to do.I've had issues with commercial turnouts having inconsistent gauging near frog causing jerking motions or wheel drop that I needed nmra gauge to find.
Alan



From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of Nigel Phillips <nigelp18000@...>
Sent: Friday, October 15, 2021 10:52:31 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Hand laying track
 
Strange. My rollers have flange way and check rail spacing capability. 

Nigel

On Friday, October 15, 2021, Alan Kilby <alankilby@...> wrote:
The  3 point and roller gauges which I use do not fit rails at frog where gauge is critical.I prefer roller gauges but they can't be used at frogs where the nmra gauge can.The nmra gauge has wheel gauge which is important when testing trackwork reliability.
Alan


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of Nigel Phillips <nigelp18000@...>
Sent: Friday, October 15, 2021 6:57:14 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Hand laying track
 
The HOn3 NMRA gauge is not available. Listed as $6 for members. $19.95 at MicroMark. Most of what it does is actually built into 3 point track gauges. The first kits I built had an included rectangle of aluminum that served as the gauge tool and flange way/point gap tool. 

Nigel

On Thursday, October 14, 2021, p. f. hollingsworth <2fisherman@...> wrote:

The subject of track gauges was mentioned. I have about a dozen old KayDee ones that I prefer over all I have tried. Steve Hatch's roller one is handy some times, but I find little liking for the ME ones- that spike sticking up gets in my way and I send 'em flying when they need to be in place. Of course, the KayDee ones have two sides for the rail size- 55 and 70, I only use the smaller rail and some code 40, so I paint them and as long as the colored side ls up all is good. Some have been painted a few times from wear. I don't know if these are still made, but I dread needing to replace 'em. 
And, on a final note, get and learn how to use the NMRA gauge. If the organization didn't ever do anything else to help modelers, this would have been enough to make me happy. I have three, because I fear losing them as well. Back when I got my first one I think they were only about a buck. Good luck with that!

 


Re: Hand laying track

Nigel Phillips
 

Strange. My rollers have flange way and check rail spacing capability. 

Nigel


On Friday, October 15, 2021, Alan Kilby <alankilby@...> wrote:
The  3 point and roller gauges which I use do not fit rails at frog where gauge is critical.I prefer roller gauges but they can't be used at frogs where the nmra gauge can.The nmra gauge has wheel gauge which is important when testing trackwork reliability.
Alan


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of Nigel Phillips <nigelp18000@...>
Sent: Friday, October 15, 2021 6:57:14 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Hand laying track
 
The HOn3 NMRA gauge is not available. Listed as $6 for members. $19.95 at MicroMark. Most of what it does is actually built into 3 point track gauges. The first kits I built had an included rectangle of aluminum that served as the gauge tool and flange way/point gap tool. 

Nigel

On Thursday, October 14, 2021, p. f. hollingsworth <2fisherman@...> wrote:

The subject of track gauges was mentioned. I have about a dozen old KayDee ones that I prefer over all I have tried. Steve Hatch's roller one is handy some times, but I find little liking for the ME ones- that spike sticking up gets in my way and I send 'em flying when they need to be in place. Of course, the KayDee ones have two sides for the rail size- 55 and 70, I only use the smaller rail and some code 40, so I paint them and as long as the colored side ls up all is good. Some have been painted a few times from wear. I don't know if these are still made, but I dread needing to replace 'em. 
And, on a final note, get and learn how to use the NMRA gauge. If the organization didn't ever do anything else to help modelers, this would have been enough to make me happy. I have three, because I fear losing them as well. Back when I got my first one I think they were only about a buck. Good luck with that!

 


Re: Hand laying track

Alan Kilby
 

The  3 point and roller gauges which I use do not fit rails at frog where gauge is critical.I prefer roller gauges but they can't be used at frogs where the nmra gauge can.The nmra gauge has wheel gauge which is important when testing trackwork reliability.
Alan


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of Nigel Phillips <nigelp18000@...>
Sent: Friday, October 15, 2021 6:57:14 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Hand laying track
 
The HOn3 NMRA gauge is not available. Listed as $6 for members. $19.95 at MicroMark. Most of what it does is actually built into 3 point track gauges. The first kits I built had an included rectangle of aluminum that served as the gauge tool and flange way/point gap tool. 

Nigel

On Thursday, October 14, 2021, p. f. hollingsworth <2fisherman@...> wrote:

The subject of track gauges was mentioned. I have about a dozen old KayDee ones that I prefer over all I have tried. Steve Hatch's roller one is handy some times, but I find little liking for the ME ones- that spike sticking up gets in my way and I send 'em flying when they need to be in place. Of course, the KayDee ones have two sides for the rail size- 55 and 70, I only use the smaller rail and some code 40, so I paint them and as long as the colored side ls up all is good. Some have been painted a few times from wear. I don't know if these are still made, but I dread needing to replace 'em. 
And, on a final note, get and learn how to use the NMRA gauge. If the organization didn't ever do anything else to help modelers, this would have been enough to make me happy. I have three, because I fear losing them as well. Back when I got my first one I think they were only about a buck. Good luck with that!

 


Re: Hand laying track

Nigel Phillips
 

Mike C and Mike VH, 

Sort of peripheral to the question of hand built track, but module design and size does have an impact. I also live in a relatively small space, and have used nothing but modules for the past 7 years. I usually go for 12"-18" wide, and 2.5' to 5' long, built of 6mm ply (top, sides, and bracing), they are not heavy. My current HOn3 trackplan needs 1.5'-2' width and a 12' length. What is important is the internal bracing if you use switch motors or want to model a gulch, trestle, etc. Plus smaller modules means more joints and connections that need undoing when working on one. And trying to adjust the track plan to make sure a switch isn't  sitting over a joint tends to have a cascading effect, especially with hand built track where the switches are usually longer than RTR ones. My advice, fit the modules to the track plan, not the track plan to the modules. Mine currently looks like 3', 5', and 4', with a width of 1.5'. If your track plan includes even a small turntable, width matters. 

Nigel


On Friday, October 15, 2021, Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:
Mike VH, a suggestion from.the older guys in our module group: consider making your mm osule sections 2'x3' long instead of 4' long.  It makes them easier to build and lighter to move around and install.  And that gets more important and we all age a bit. 

Mike Conder

On Thu, Oct 14, 2021 at 9:47 PM Mike Van Hove <vanhovem22@...> wrote:
I have nearly got things ready to start building.  I now live in a retirement facility  and don’t have a lot of room.

I can build 8 ft down one wall and 13 ft down the other.  A basic “L” shape. 

I plan on building modules 4 ft long and 2 ft wide.

Those will be small enough I can take them to another room and build them one at a time.

This may sound like heresy, but for now, it’s only going to be handled track and Fastracks turnouts.  All code 55.

I already have the turnouts built, before we moved.

For the scenery part, I won’t build any.  At least for now, anyway.

If I get the track running smoothly, then I “May”, go for some scenery.  I have a lot of nice buildings, just waiting to be installed, if it looks like it will run well.

Heck, I’m 83 and in pretty good shape, but who knows what tomorrow will bring, so I don’t want to have massive plans for John Allen Scenery.

So, that’s my take on Hand Laid Track,

And, that’s the name of that game! 🤪

Mike Van Hove





















--
Mike Conder


Re: Hand laying track

Mike Conder
 

Mike VH, a suggestion from.the older guys in our module group: consider making your mm osule sections 2'x3' long instead of 4' long.  It makes them easier to build and lighter to move around and install.  And that gets more important and we all age a bit. 

Mike Conder

On Thu, Oct 14, 2021 at 9:47 PM Mike Van Hove <vanhovem22@...> wrote:
I have nearly got things ready to start building.  I now live in a retirement facility  and don’t have a lot of room.

I can build 8 ft down one wall and 13 ft down the other.  A basic “L” shape. 

I plan on building modules 4 ft long and 2 ft wide.

Those will be small enough I can take them to another room and build them one at a time.

This may sound like heresy, but for now, it’s only going to be handled track and Fastracks turnouts.  All code 55.

I already have the turnouts built, before we moved.

For the scenery part, I won’t build any.  At least for now, anyway.

If I get the track running smoothly, then I “May”, go for some scenery.  I have a lot of nice buildings, just waiting to be installed, if it looks like it will run well.

Heck, I’m 83 and in pretty good shape, but who knows what tomorrow will bring, so I don’t want to have massive plans for John Allen Scenery.

So, that’s my take on Hand Laid Track,

And, that’s the name of that game! 🤪

Mike Van Hove





















--
Mike Conder


Re: Hand laying track

Nigel Phillips
 

The HOn3 NMRA gauge is not available. Listed as $6 for members. $19.95 at MicroMark. Most of what it does is actually built into 3 point track gauges. The first kits I built had an included rectangle of aluminum that served as the gauge tool and flange way/point gap tool. 

Nigel


On Thursday, October 14, 2021, p. f. hollingsworth <2fisherman@...> wrote:

The subject of track gauges was mentioned. I have about a dozen old KayDee ones that I prefer over all I have tried. Steve Hatch's roller one is handy some times, but I find little liking for the ME ones- that spike sticking up gets in my way and I send 'em flying when they need to be in place. Of course, the KayDee ones have two sides for the rail size- 55 and 70, I only use the smaller rail and some code 40, so I paint them and as long as the colored side ls up all is good. Some have been painted a few times from wear. I don't know if these are still made, but I dread needing to replace 'em. 
And, on a final note, get and learn how to use the NMRA gauge. If the organization didn't ever do anything else to help modelers, this would have been enough to make me happy. I have three, because I fear losing them as well. Back when I got my first one I think they were only about a buck. Good luck with that!

 

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