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Re: diaphragms for coaches

Mick Moignard
 

Art

Glad to have inspired them and thanks for the shoutout.  Wanna send me a pair and I’ll try them out on a new coach I obtained recently!

Mick

________________________________
Mick Moignard
m: +44 7774 652504
Skype: mickmoignard

The week may start M,T but it always ends WTF.


1.25" PVC Water Tank for a Grandt Stamp Mill

Dusty
 

Materials. .020 x .060 scribed. Schedule 40 1.25" PVC. Zap CA - ACC.

Tools. 6" square. Knife. Micro Quick Grip Clamp. ACC Applicators. Circle Square (for laying out joists and bents attached to bottom inset).

1. Build Circle Square. Square with a Right isosceles triangle built in.

2. Build a higher capacity precision ACC Applicator. Needle with eye opened and styrene tubing or pin vise.

3. Clamp scribed styrene to pipe about an inch from the end of styrene. Justify sheet edge and pipe end on a precision surface plate or a slightly less precise surplus office desk top.

4. Hold the short end down as square as possible. Carefully apply minimal ACC to edge of strip. Engage the styrene end edge with a death grip or a second clamp. Let cure completely.

4. Carefully pull the styrene around and determine the correct length. Trim.

5. Stretch and glue carefully a little bit at a time checking alignment. Unless you are very confident then squirt ACC liberally and roll the styrene around. I'm chicken based on prior unfavorable large area ACC outcomes.

6. When I get to the end I check the joint and clamp it flat and carefully apply ACC.

7. I cut the round overlapping top and inset bottom pieces on my Cricut.

8. I still need bands, base bents and misc details like piping, hatch, ladder and whatever comes to mind. Maybe a 'lots of work' peaked roof? Maybe locate the tank under an attached lean to roof?

Dusty Burman


Re: HOn3 Galloping Goose Trucks

cmdrwmriker
 

Hello all, thank you for the stimulating conversations on the GG trucks.  The unit my friend has is a standard gauge Con-Cor plastic HO unit.  He was thinking of modifying it to HOn3, but has since decided to leave it alone, and search for an actual HOn3 unit.  So, the original question I posed is moot.  Thank you. Bill
 


From: Mark <mark@...>
To: HOn3 <HOn3@groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, 22 June 2021 9:45 AM PDT
Subject: Re: [HOn3] HOn3 Galloping Goose Trucks

What sort of GG did he buy? Was it a ConCor or a brass one - if the latter which maker?
Mark K


Re: diaphragms for coaches

Mark Lewis
 

Art,

Thanks for the update!

Mark Lewis 
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.

On Thu, Jun 24, 2021, 10:08 AM Art D3 <apdutra3@...> wrote:
I am testing the current version of my 3D printed operating diaphragms and they seem to be working well so far. I need to do a little more testing, but I think they'll work well in this current version. Thanks for the inspiration of your brass versions Mick Moignard! I did not include any simulated bellows like Mick did because it was limiting the travel of the diaphragms too much with printed versions. The diaphragms are designed to use between 2 and 6 Kadee #622 springs to provide the tension between the diaphragms. With six springs installed, you can carefully slide a pick between the diaphragms for manual uncoupling, but you do risk derailing cars. A better way to uncouple would be a Kadee magnetic uncoupler. Park the cars over the uncoupler and gently push the two cars towards each other to get some slack for the couplers to operate. I plan to run my San Juan trains through a reversing loop so I won't need to uncouple frequently. Since these two cars are still under construction I have not installed the leaf spring prints yet. They can be installed so that they won't interfere with the diaphragms operation while still adding the detail which will also partially conceal the springs on top, or they can be left off.


I will be adding these to my offerings on https://3dptrain.com the new website created by Western Rails which will offer Western Rails products and printed products from other content providers hopefully at better pricing than Shapeways. My items will be under Narrow Gauge Technologies.
--
Art Dutra
Meriden, CT


Re: diaphragms for coaches

Art D3
 

I am testing the current version of my 3D printed operating diaphragms and they seem to be working well so far. I need to do a little more testing, but I think they'll work well in this current version. Thanks for the inspiration of your brass versions Mick Moignard! I did not include any simulated bellows like Mick did because it was limiting the travel of the diaphragms too much with printed versions. The diaphragms are designed to use between 2 and 6 Kadee #622 springs to provide the tension between the diaphragms. With six springs installed, you can carefully slide a pick between the diaphragms for manual uncoupling, but you do risk derailing cars. A better way to uncouple would be a Kadee magnetic uncoupler. Park the cars over the uncoupler and gently push the two cars towards each other to get some slack for the couplers to operate. I plan to run my San Juan trains through a reversing loop so I won't need to uncouple frequently. Since these two cars are still under construction I have not installed the leaf spring prints yet. They can be installed so that they won't interfere with the diaphragms operation while still adding the detail which will also partially conceal the springs on top, or they can be left off.


I will be adding these to my offerings on https://3dptrain.com the new website created by Western Rails which will offer Western Rails products and printed products from other content providers hopefully at better pricing than Shapeways. My items will be under Narrow Gauge Technologies.
--
Art Dutra
Meriden, CT


Re: HOn3 Galloping Goose Trucks

Mark Kasprowicz
 

Thanks Jim,

I used one to motorise an HOn3 Lambert Goose 6 and wondered if they might still be available. But it's an expensive business to butcher a complete Con-Cor goose just for the truck.

Mark K


C&S Stock Car kits Now Shipping

Bill M
 

Hi Everyone,

Apologies for this brief commercial!

I wanted to let everyone know that the kit for the C&S AC&F/St. Charles stock car as delivered is available NOW! These kits are available in HOn3, Sn3, and On3/30. Much different than the later better known version, this one is pre-1911 Safety Act, different doors and runners, and of course different lettering. A must for every early C&S modeler and anyone who enjoys fine building. Kit comprises laser cut woods, etched brass, injected plastic, and printed details; and complete lettering. Available in limited numbers in HOn3, Sn3, and On3. For more information see:



Re: HOn3 Galloping Goose Trucks

jmcqiv@...
 

Mark

That may have been a couple of years ago.  I called and was told by someone that I had to call back on a certain day and time to talk to whoever it was that would be there then.
I did that and was told what the item number was and where to send the check to.
 A couple of weeks later the truck arrived and has been good since then.
Good luck!
Jim McQueeny

On Wednesday, June 23, 2021, 1:07:35 AM CDT, Mark Kasprowicz <mark@...> wrote:


Was that recently Jim?

Mark K


Re: HOn3 Galloping Goose Trucks

Mark Kasprowicz
 

Was that recently Jim?

Mark K


Re: HOn3 Galloping Goose Trucks

jmcqiv@...
 

I bought a Con Cor rear truck direct from them that had melted when it shorted on a frog. 

Jim McQueeny MMR
Rockford IL USA


On Jun 22, 2021, at 12:54 PM, Mark Kasprowicz <mark@...> wrote:

Did - ie past tense. Rocking horse shit now!


Re: HOn3 Galloping Goose Trucks

Mark Kasprowicz
 

Did - ie past tense. Rocking horse shit now!


Re: HOn3 Galloping Goose Trucks

Ray
 

Doesn't Concor sell them?  I bought them about a decade ago.
--
Ray in Colorado


Re: HOn3 Galloping Goose Trucks

Mark Kasprowicz
 

What sort of GG did he buy? Was it a ConCor or a brass one - if the latter which maker?
Mark K


Re: Narrow gauge - in 1905

John Stutz
 

On June 20, 2021 6:28 PM climax@... wrote:

I have the prefect reason that narrow gauge existed and was used for so long. They used less wood. Wood ties that is. The ties were shorter and smaller! Think of the money they saved.

Dave

Dave

That was Matthias N.  Forney's conclusion, in a mid 1890's editorial review of the construction cost savings directly attributable to the choice of 3' gauge over 4' 8.5", all other factors being equal:  That the biggest difference would be the cost of ties, for an overall savings of about 1%.

But the principle point made in that editorial was that a standard gauge road could be built and operated on any alignment over which a 3' gauge road had been built.  As was being demonstrated by widespread recent and ongoing gauge conversions.

Unfortunately I did not record a reference to that editorial, so cannot give the source.  But Hilton's "American Narrow Gauge" has an entire chapter on the gauge question, and probably does reference this. 

My own take on the gauge question is: Good transportation facilities are key to the prosperity of any community, and in the U.S. prior to the flowering of the Good Roads movement in the 1920's, railroads were the only means for reliable all-weather overland transport.  Add in the universal experience that smaller is (usually) cheaper, and I think it obvious why rail-less communities, faced with the overwhelming costs of existing railroad's construction, could convince themselves that a smaller railroad must be a cheaper one.  The supporting semi-technical arguments were primarily rationalizations, devised to justify the wished for conclusion.  And proved to be no more effective than most such rationalizations. 

But as several others have said better than I can, the result made for some very attractive modeling prototypes.

John Stutz


HOn3 Galloping Goose Trucks

cmdrwmriker
 

One member of my RR club purchased a GG without any trucks.  No comment on that purchase, but now He is looking to find some trucks for it.  Imagine that.  So, does anyone out there have a Con-cor GG for parts or know of any trucks that will fit/operate this thing?  I am an ignoramus about GG's (I would not, however buy one without trucks).
Thank you 
bill m.


Re: Narrow gauge - in 1905

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Jun 21, 2021, at 08:11, Ed Weldon <23.weldon@comcast.net> wrote:

1905 was a time of relative prosperity. With wood and paint cheap and available and lots of construction was going on. Good era to model if your weathering skills aren't that great. Depression era piles of junk were much less common. Urban scenes are harder to model accurately with all the electric wires overhead and mining operations we all love had grown substantially in physical size. Oil refineries had no modern cracking towers, but other industrial operations saw structures growing into huge sizes. Paved roads were almost non-existent outside cities. Multi-story building construction was done with a small forest of timber tripod derricks on top. Horse drawn vehicles were far more common than automobiles. And of course there was an abundance of cute electric trolleys in sight even out into the growing suburbs. A n interesting era to model in narrow gauge if you want to follow obscure and forgotten eastern railroads.
Let us not chop the liver of the South Pacific Coast, running commuters between Santa Cruz and San Francisco (with a ferry fleet containing the SS Newark!) along the Alameda County shore of San Francisco Bay. It seems that it was due to domestic issues and health rather than economics that induced Jim Fair to sell out to the local Big Four, who only later standard-gauged the line. This was big-time main line railroading.
--
Artie the Hinged Jaw
Retired AFU Game Warden


Re: Narrow gauge - in 1905

 

1905 was a time of relative prosperity.  With wood and paint cheap and available and lots of construction was going on.  Good era to model if your weathering skills aren't that great.  Depression era piles of junk were much less common.  Urban scenes are harder to model accurately with all the electric wires overhead and mining operations we all love had grown substantially in physical size. Oil refineries had no modern cracking towers, but other industrial operations saw structures growing into huge sizes. Paved roads were almost non-existent outside cities.  Multi-story building construction was done with a small forest of timber tripod derricks on top. Horse drawn vehicles were far more common than automobiles.  And of course there was an abundance of cute electric trolleys in sight even out into the growing suburbs.  A n interesting era to model in narrow gauge if you want to follow obscure and forgotten eastern railroads. 


Re: Narrow gauge - in 1905

Climax@...
 

All true, it adds up in the big picture.

Dave,

Wood was cheap or free, rails were not. That was where the savings were made. Plus tunnels were smaller, bridges lighter, curves tighter, grades steeper.

Nigel


On Sunday, June 20, 2021, <Climax@...> wrote:

I have the prefect reason that narrow gauge existed and was used for so long. They used less wood. Wood ties that is. The ties were shorter and smaller! Think of the money they saved.

Dave

Nigel

I agree that South Africa is a good example of successful narrow gauge operation, but note that the 42" gauge is the regional standard gauge, and that their 24" gauge agricultural development  lines are now largely (wholly?) abandoned.  Additionally, SAR's lines were mostly built to contemporary mainline railroad standards, while poorly located ones have been upgraded, and that the government long discouraged competition by trucking.

Similarly, the Queensland Gvt Ry moves a large export coal traffic over upgraded 42" gauge lines to the coal terminals, while former agricultural development branches have withered.

In Brazil the meter gauge (39.37") mainline of the Estrada de Ferro Victoria a Minas started as a light development railroad, has been twice extensively rebuilt, and has for the last half century carried an immense iron ore traffic down to Victoria.  In fact, much of South America's railways remain meter gauge, and will likely continue so indefinably, particularly where they are the regional standard gauge.

Japanese railways originally standardized on the 42" gauge, and by far the larger part remains on this gauge, but the primary passenger lines are wholly new built over the last 50 years, on the 56.5" gauge, to far higher standard than any US lines.  Being purely passenger lines, the break of gauge problem is minimized.



John Stutz





Re: Narrow gauge - in 1905

Nigel Phillips
 

Dave,

Wood was cheap or free, rails were not. That was where the savings were made. Plus tunnels were smaller, bridges lighter, curves tighter, grades steeper.

Nigel


On Sunday, June 20, 2021, <Climax@...> wrote:

I have the prefect reason that narrow gauge existed and was used for so long. They used less wood. Wood ties that is. The ties were shorter and smaller! Think of the money they saved.

Dave

Nigel

I agree that South Africa is a good example of successful narrow gauge operation, but note that the 42" gauge is the regional standard gauge, and that their 24" gauge agricultural development  lines are now largely (wholly?) abandoned.  Additionally, SAR's lines were mostly built to contemporary mainline railroad standards, while poorly located ones have been upgraded, and that the government long discouraged competition by trucking.

Similarly, the Queensland Gvt Ry moves a large export coal traffic over upgraded 42" gauge lines to the coal terminals, while former agricultural development branches have withered.

In Brazil the meter gauge (39.37") mainline of the Estrada de Ferro Victoria a Minas started as a light development railroad, has been twice extensively rebuilt, and has for the last half century carried an immense iron ore traffic down to Victoria.  In fact, much of South America's railways remain meter gauge, and will likely continue so indefinably, particularly where they are the regional standard gauge.

Japanese railways originally standardized on the 42" gauge, and by far the larger part remains on this gauge, but the primary passenger lines are wholly new built over the last 50 years, on the 56.5" gauge, to far higher standard than any US lines.  Being purely passenger lines, the break of gauge problem is minimized.



John Stutz



Re: Narrow gauge - in 1905

Climax@...
 

I have the prefect reason that narrow gauge existed and was used for so long. They used less wood. Wood ties that is. The ties were shorter and smaller! Think of the money they saved.

Dave

Nigel

I agree that South Africa is a good example of successful narrow gauge operation, but note that the 42" gauge is the regional standard gauge, and that their 24" gauge agricultural development  lines are now largely (wholly?) abandoned.  Additionally, SAR's lines were mostly built to contemporary mainline railroad standards, while poorly located ones have been upgraded, and that the government long discouraged competition by trucking.

Similarly, the Queensland Gvt Ry moves a large export coal traffic over upgraded 42" gauge lines to the coal terminals, while former agricultural development branches have withered.

In Brazil the meter gauge (39.37") mainline of the Estrada de Ferro Victoria a Minas started as a light development railroad, has been twice extensively rebuilt, and has for the last half century carried an immense iron ore traffic down to Victoria.  In fact, much of South America's railways remain meter gauge, and will likely continue so indefinably, particularly where they are the regional standard gauge.

Japanese railways originally standardized on the 42" gauge, and by far the larger part remains on this gauge, but the primary passenger lines are wholly new built over the last 50 years, on the 56.5" gauge, to far higher standard than any US lines.  Being purely passenger lines, the break of gauge problem is minimized.



John Stutz


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