Date   

Passenger Car Roofs

Don Bergman
 

I am looking for suggestion to simulate the canvas roof on my LaBelle Passenger car fleet.

Don Bergman


Re: Broad Top Mountain Models HO.HOn3 East Broad Top Car Shop

NarrowMinded1
 

Hi Ric,
 
I will receive the kits the first week of June and expect to be shipping them the second week of June.once I return home from rehab at the end of the month...Part of my post from Facebook..."Nate's Light Iron Hobbies and Broad Top Mountain Models will be experiencing delays in processing orders from Thursday May 6th through October due to me getting my leg amputated as a result of a diabetic ulcer. Please know that I will do my best to process and ship your orders as soon as I return home from rehab in 3-4 weeks."
--
Nathan M. Kline
Nate's HOn3 East Broad Top RR & Coal Co.
___________________________________

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVJMoICFWw9Muse6xm8moiQ
MeWe Group: https://mewe.com/group/5fbb79e7edc4177fe935a858
Nate's Light Iron Hobbies: http://nateslightironhobbies.com
Broad Top Mountain Models: http://broadtopmountainmodels.com


C&S books for sale

Andrew Keplinger
 

I have the following books for sale by Tom and Denise Klinger. Contact me off line akep1963@... 


Re: 41st National Narrow Gauge Convention update

John G Massura
 

If you gave the correct link, it might work better:



On May 9, 2021, at 15:01, johnny graybeal <johnnyg@...> wrote:



41st National Narrow Gauge Convention update

johnny graybeal
 
Edited

Updates to the 41st National Narrow Gauge Convention website are occurring weekly now. Clinics, home layouts, and modular groups are being added, as well as museums in the area that will interest the model railroader and historical people. We intend for there to be far more than you can do in the four days of the convention. The Tweetsie Country bus trip will take all day, with a visit to the Linville Depot, Doe River Gorge, and the George L. Carter museum to see the ET&WNC HOn3 layout there, and that is before the official convention begins. More will be added as it is finalized. The pandemic has hit the narrow gauge world hard, but we will bring it back with this annual convention. For those of you who have never attended one, a National Narrow Gauge Convention brings fans of narrow gauge model railroads and the full sized real thing together for four days of fun with others who feel just as you do. Visit www.41nngc.com for more information. Please forward this to any other groups that you might feel would be interested.
Johnny Graybeal
41st NNGC Convention Chairman


Re: Broad Top Mountain Models HO.HOn3 East Broad Top Car Shop

Ric Case
 

Nate when do you expect them to be delivered?

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On May 4, 2021, at 10:43 PM, NarrowMinded1 via groups.io <nathan.kline83@...> wrote:

Now available for pre-order!

Broad Top Mountain Models HO.HOn3 East Broad Top Car Shop...

Scale: HO
Description (Courtesy of oldeastie.com):

The Car Shop is one of the largest building in the EBT shops. The original part of the shop is also one of the oldest in the shops complex, but it has been expanded several times to more than twice its original size. It was the primary location where rolling stock of all types were constructed or repaired. In the early decades of the railroad the rolling stock fleet consisted of all wood cars, but staring in the 1910's began to transition to steel. Because of the early wood constitution, the Car Shop is where the power woodworking equipment is located. Even to the end of operations, the passenger cars remained wood along with components of other cars.

The building contains three tracks, two of which run entirely through the building and one that terminates about halfway through. Cars in need of service were spotted on the long lead tracks to the south of the building. A slight grade allowed cars to be gravity switched into the building for work, then gravity switched out the north end. To the north both tracks switched together and crossed over the Orbisonia Scale where rebuilt cars could be weighed and stenciled with their tare (empty) weight. The building is equipped with numerous rivet forges and air lines for riveting of steel cars.Today the building is mainly used for storage of the operable rolling stock during the winter months.

Support the Friends of the East Broad Top! Please visit <https://store.febt.org/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=69_118>to purchase the car shop through the FEBT Company Store!

Features:

    As True to the Prototype As Possible
    Laser Cut Floor
    Laser Cut Interior Framing
    Laser Cut Roof Rafters
    Laser Cut Walls
    Laser Cut Battens
    Laser Cut Doors
    Laser Cut Windows
    Laser Cut Sub Roof
    Corrugated Metal Roofing Material
   
Provisions to be Built as a Stand Alone Structure OR add to the Machine Shop and Boiler House

Footprint: Approx. 24 x 7 Inches

ETA: Early/Late June

MSRP: $250.00 USD  Your Price: $200.00 USD Shipped Insured USPS Priority Mail + 6% PA sales tax for PA residents. International orders ship via insured USPS Priority Mail International at cost.

SPECIAL PRE-ORDER PRICE: $187.50 FOR FIRST 17 ORDERS!

INFO: http://broadtopmountainmodels.com/east-broad-top-car-shop.html

PURCHASE: http://www.nateslightironhobbies.com/store/broadtop-mountain-models/laser-kits/hohon3/east-broad-top-ho/hon3-boiler-house-laser-cut-craftsman-structure-kit-p2270.html
--
Nathan M. Kline
Nate's HOn3 East Broad Top RR & Coal Co.
___________________________________

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVJMoICFWw9Muse6xm8moiQ
MeWe Group: https://mewe.com/group/5fbb79e7edc4177fe935a858
Nate's Light Iron Hobbies: http://nateslightironhobbies.com
Broad Top Mountain Models: http://broadtopmountainmodels.com
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#2030 Apothecary False Front - HO Scale

richrands
 

Laser cut wood with white metal detail parts. Building is made to allow for an interior to be added if you desire. Decals and a sign included. 2-1/4" x 3-1/8"
$21.95
#2029 Boardwalks available separately.
https://www.berkshirevalleymodels.com/apps/webstore/



Re: Murder on the San Juan Express - Good News!

Robert Bennett
 

Hi All,

I got my copy a month or so ago; good read and history! I still haven;t figured out the "puzzle" though.

Bob Bennett


Re: Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

Bill Lugg
 

Thanks for the responses.  I had a brain fart last night based on Mr. Brennan's proposal that I could 3D print a block to hold a group of ties I could run through the table saw...with great care.  I'm working on the model for that now and will let you know of my success.

Bill Lugg

On 5/7/21 8:46 PM, lloyd lehrer wrote:
Buy a little electric chopsaw

lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097

On Fri, May 7, 2021, 7:18 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net <mailto:luggw1@risebroadband.net>> wrote:

I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24
turnouts
that will go in a yard.  Are there any thoughts for a quick way to do
this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple weeks
cutting
a few at a time?

Thanks
Bill Lugg








--
lloyd lehrer


Re: Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

Jim Marlett
 

I use a Chopper to cut switch ties and it isn’t that time consuming. I cut them three at a time and cut all I anticipate needing of any particular length at one time, then move on to the next length. Each length is put into its own zip lock sandwich bag with a label identifying that length in HO scale feet. You may have to do this in more than one session, but it shouldn’t take weeks.

To place the ties, I download a template from Fast Tracks, print it out and tape it to my workbench. I use a left hand template for right hand switches and a left hand template for right hand switches since I will be taping the ties upside down. I place a strip of painter’s tape sticky side up down the center of the template then tape the ends to the workbench somewhere beyond the template. I label the template for each tie length in HO scale feet so I can easily know which sandwich bag I should be dipping into for that particular tie. I place the tie on the template and tape until I have the whole template covered, lift up the tape/ties, hang them in a convenient place and move on the the next one. I suppose I could make a three dimensional template like I have for making standard length tie strips, but by the time I finished that, I would have a pretty significant number of switch tied glued to the layout using my “slow” method.

I should probably mention that Fast Tracks presupposes that your standard tie length will be 7 feet. If you use 6.5 foot. or 6 foot. ties, you should shorten the  length of each switch tie by six inches or a foot if you want to match those tie lengths.

In the photo, this switch will have pc board ties in the places where they are left off. If you aren’t soldering rails to pc board ties, you will want to include all of the ties indicated. The Kapler switch ties I use are only 12 feet long vs. Mt. Albert ties which are 14 feet long. That has consequences at the wide end of the template.



Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On May 7, 2021, at 9:18 PM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:

I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24 turnouts that will go in a yard.  Are there any thoughts for a quick way to do this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple weeks cutting a few at a time?

Thanks
Bill Lugg









Re: Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

Climax@...
 

When I hand lay track I first start by taking a 1 x 4 and gluing a 1/8 x 1/8 inch strip along its length. I then start putting ties glue do it. I put a glued down tie on then a non glued down tie, then a glued tie etc until I have about 24 inches of ties. I remove all the ties that are not glued down with a piece of blue painters tape or masking tape. I glue the surface where I want the ties and lay them in place on the glue. The tape keeps the spacing even in a curve. After it dries I just remove the tape and wala it's ready to lay rail on followed by ballast. Switches I draw where I want them, run the above tie strips as above up to where the switches are. I take a premade switch and lay it in place and go around it with a pencil. It clearly shows the spacing and length of each required tie. I just cut to length, and glue them down. I have even used regular length ties in some switches which was prototype on some railroads. Once I reach a point where the standard tie spacing is required, go back to using the painters taped ties. The jig never wears out and is so easy to use I even had my daughter make me strips of ties ready for gluing.
I used a .020 drill to drill holes on every 7th tie to spike Code 70 down. Seemed to help eliminate the disappearing spikes that go twang and you never find them again as you pushed them into an nondrilled tie.
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net>
Sent: May 7, 2021 11:05 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

That's a good idea.  Where would one acquire these for HO turnouts?

Thanks
Bill Lugg


On 5/7/21 8:52 PM, Richard Brennan wrote:
At 07:18 PM 5/7/2021, Bill Lugg wrote:
I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24
turnouts that will go in a yard.  Are there any thoughts for a quick
way to do this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple
weeks cutting a few at a time?
Use a laser cut (or similar) 'comb'... which is a fixture slotted to
receive un-cut tie stock
The tie material is inserted against the diverging (curved) side of
the fixture...
the straight side of the comb is left open... and the ties are cut-off
as regularly or irregularly as you prefer.
Blue painter's tape will hold them together nicely as you place them
in the yard.

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

Example:
[]








Re: Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

Bill Lugg
 

That's a good idea.  Where would one acquire these for HO turnouts?

Thanks
Bill Lugg

On 5/7/21 8:52 PM, Richard Brennan wrote:
At 07:18 PM 5/7/2021, Bill Lugg wrote:
I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24 turnouts that will go in a yard.  Are there any thoughts for a quick way to do this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple weeks cutting a few at a time?
Use a laser cut (or similar) 'comb'... which is a fixture slotted to receive un-cut tie stock
The tie material is inserted against the diverging (curved) side of the fixture...
the straight side of the comb is left open... and the ties are cut-off as regularly or irregularly as you prefer.
Blue painter's tape will hold them together nicely as you place them in the yard.

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

Example:
[]




Re: Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

Richard Brennan
 

At 07:18 PM 5/7/2021, Bill Lugg wrote:
I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24 turnouts that will go in a yard. Are there any thoughts for a quick way to do this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple weeks cutting a few at a time?
Use a laser cut (or similar) 'comb'... which is a fixture slotted to receive un-cut tie stock
The tie material is inserted against the diverging (curved) side of the fixture...
the straight side of the comb is left open... and the ties are cut-off as regularly or irregularly as you prefer.
Blue painter's tape will hold them together nicely as you place them in the yard.

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

Example:
[]


Re: Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

lloyd lehrer
 

Buy a little electric chopsaw

lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097

On Fri, May 7, 2021, 7:18 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24 turnouts
that will go in a yard.  Are there any thoughts for a quick way to do
this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple weeks cutting
a few at a time?

Thanks
Bill Lugg








--
lloyd lehrer


Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

Bill Lugg
 

I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24 turnouts that will go in a yard.  Are there any thoughts for a quick way to do this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple weeks cutting a few at a time?

Thanks
Bill Lugg


Re: Murder on the San Juan Express - Good News!

kevin sivils
 

Russ,
 
Hope you enjoy the story!
 
Kevin

On 05/07/2021 1:38 PM Russ Norris <rbnorrisjr@...> wrote:
 
 
Kevin, I picked up a copy from Amazon and am just digging in.  Thanks for the tip.
 
Russ Norris, MMR

On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 1:22 AM kevin sivils < ksivils@...> wrote:
I'd like to thank those of you who picked up a copy of Murder on the San Juan Express! It hit #1 in the category of Railroad Fiction on Amazon.

As a heads up in case you haven't picked up a copy and would like to, there will be a price increase on the 22nd of March. The Kindle edition will go up in price to $4.99 and the paperback will go up in price to $12.95. To get a copy use this link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08XYNH47G/


 

 


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Dave Eggleston
 

Thanks Randy! That is mostly what I understood but good to have it all in one place.

Dave

On May 7, 2021, at 12:21 PM, Randy Hees <randyhees@...> wrote:


_._,_._,_


Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Randy Hees
 

"It was more common to find red lead on the wood in contact with iron [...]" is interesting. Does this mean that queen posts or trussrod pad would also be given some paint or lead, and if so, on only the contact side or completely? The truss rods only given lead red where they pierce frame members or along the entire length? Brake wheel and rod unpainted while the holding plate for the rod would be painted? Etc, etc, etc.

 

There are two different issues, 1) any protective painting, much like primer, and 2) the final paint and lettering…

 

I have seen period references to ironwork called out as painted, especially items such as grab irons, but recognize these references as terribly vague. They suggest ironwork got some type of paint coating at times. On this, we tend to think these cars were painted exclusively in red (of some type) and you mention the red on hand in one location. But I've also seen black called out for ironwork by some car builders--any evidence Carter opted to black ironwork in the 1874-1879 period?

 

Finally: trucks. Completely painted or only certain elements? 

 

I think most iron work was painted, if not to protect wood, then because it was visible…  It was most commonly painted the body color, not a contrasting color with refrigerator or other “line cars” being receiving the more detailed paint, so most cars just red…with no documented cases of Carter picking out hardware in a contrasting color…

 

Trucks are more difficult, but I believe that generally on freight cars, just body color…


Randy Hees 


On Fri, May 7, 2021 at 9:59 AM Dave Eggleston via groups.io <degg13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Randy, 

Great comments on how woodwork was addressed. Looking for a bit of clarification of the ironwork painting--or an idea of prevailing understanding based on the limited sources we have to hand in the present. 

"It was more common to find red lead on the wood in contact with iron [...]" is interesting. Does this mean that queen posts or trussrod pad would also be given some paint or lead, and if so, on only the contact side or completely? The truss rods only given lead red where they pierce frame members or along the entire length? Brake wheel and rod unpainted while the holding plate for the rod would be painted? Etc, etc, etc.

I have seen period references to ironwork called out as painted, especially items such as grab irons, but recognize these references as terribly vague. They suggest ironwork got some type of paint coating at times. On this, we tend to think these cars were painted exclusively in red (of some type) and you mention the red on hand in one location. But I've also seen black called out for ironwork by some car builders--any evidence Carter opted to black ironwork in the 1874-1879 period?

Finally: trucks. Completely painted or only certain elements? 

I recall Jim Wilke turning a lot of people's understanding of 1860s-1890s engine painting practices on its head starting in the early 1990s...very exciting and surprising, often against modern expectations and bias. I suspect the same goes for wood cars. 

Thanks
Dave




Re: Murder on the San Juan Express - Good News!

Russ Norris
 

Kevin, I picked up a copy from Amazon and am just digging in.  Thanks for the tip.

Russ Norris, MMR


On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 1:22 AM kevin sivils <ksivils@...> wrote:
I'd like to thank those of you who picked up a copy of Murder on the San Juan Express! It hit #1 in the category of Railroad Fiction on Amazon.

As a heads up in case you haven't picked up a copy and would like to, there will be a price increase on the 22nd of March. The Kindle edition will go up in price to $4.99 and the paperback will go up in price to $12.95. To get a copy use this link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08XYNH47G/



--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Dave Eggleston
 

Randy, 

Great comments on how woodwork was addressed. Looking for a bit of clarification of the ironwork painting--or an idea of prevailing understanding based on the limited sources we have to hand in the present. 

"It was more common to find red lead on the wood in contact with iron [...]" is interesting. Does this mean that queen posts or trussrod pad would also be given some paint or lead, and if so, on only the contact side or completely? The truss rods only given lead red where they pierce frame members or along the entire length? Brake wheel and rod unpainted while the holding plate for the rod would be painted? Etc, etc, etc.

I have seen period references to ironwork called out as painted, especially items such as grab irons, but recognize these references as terribly vague. They suggest ironwork got some type of paint coating at times. On this, we tend to think these cars were painted exclusively in red (of some type) and you mention the red on hand in one location. But I've also seen black called out for ironwork by some car builders--any evidence Carter opted to black ironwork in the 1874-1879 period?

Finally: trucks. Completely painted or only certain elements? 

I recall Jim Wilke turning a lot of people's understanding of 1860s-1890s engine painting practices on its head starting in the early 1990s...very exciting and surprising, often against modern expectations and bias. I suspect the same goes for wood cars. 

Thanks
Dave



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