Date   

Re: Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

Climax@...
 

When I hand lay track I first start by taking a 1 x 4 and gluing a 1/8 x 1/8 inch strip along its length. I then start putting ties glue do it. I put a glued down tie on then a non glued down tie, then a glued tie etc until I have about 24 inches of ties. I remove all the ties that are not glued down with a piece of blue painters tape or masking tape. I glue the surface where I want the ties and lay them in place on the glue. The tape keeps the spacing even in a curve. After it dries I just remove the tape and wala it's ready to lay rail on followed by ballast. Switches I draw where I want them, run the above tie strips as above up to where the switches are. I take a premade switch and lay it in place and go around it with a pencil. It clearly shows the spacing and length of each required tie. I just cut to length, and glue them down. I have even used regular length ties in some switches which was prototype on some railroads. Once I reach a point where the standard tie spacing is required, go back to using the painters taped ties. The jig never wears out and is so easy to use I even had my daughter make me strips of ties ready for gluing.
I used a .020 drill to drill holes on every 7th tie to spike Code 70 down. Seemed to help eliminate the disappearing spikes that go twang and you never find them again as you pushed them into an nondrilled tie.
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net>
Sent: May 7, 2021 11:05 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

That's a good idea.  Where would one acquire these for HO turnouts?

Thanks
Bill Lugg


On 5/7/21 8:52 PM, Richard Brennan wrote:
At 07:18 PM 5/7/2021, Bill Lugg wrote:
I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24
turnouts that will go in a yard.  Are there any thoughts for a quick
way to do this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple
weeks cutting a few at a time?
Use a laser cut (or similar) 'comb'... which is a fixture slotted to
receive un-cut tie stock
The tie material is inserted against the diverging (curved) side of
the fixture...
the straight side of the comb is left open... and the ties are cut-off
as regularly or irregularly as you prefer.
Blue painter's tape will hold them together nicely as you place them
in the yard.

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

Example:
[]








Re: Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

Bill Lugg
 

That's a good idea.  Where would one acquire these for HO turnouts?

Thanks
Bill Lugg

On 5/7/21 8:52 PM, Richard Brennan wrote:
At 07:18 PM 5/7/2021, Bill Lugg wrote:
I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24 turnouts that will go in a yard.  Are there any thoughts for a quick way to do this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple weeks cutting a few at a time?
Use a laser cut (or similar) 'comb'... which is a fixture slotted to receive un-cut tie stock
The tie material is inserted against the diverging (curved) side of the fixture...
the straight side of the comb is left open... and the ties are cut-off as regularly or irregularly as you prefer.
Blue painter's tape will hold them together nicely as you place them in the yard.

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

Example:
[]




Re: Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

Richard Brennan
 

At 07:18 PM 5/7/2021, Bill Lugg wrote:
I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24 turnouts that will go in a yard. Are there any thoughts for a quick way to do this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple weeks cutting a few at a time?
Use a laser cut (or similar) 'comb'... which is a fixture slotted to receive un-cut tie stock
The tie material is inserted against the diverging (curved) side of the fixture...
the straight side of the comb is left open... and the ties are cut-off as regularly or irregularly as you prefer.
Blue painter's tape will hold them together nicely as you place them in the yard.

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

Example:
[]


Re: Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

lloyd lehrer
 

Buy a little electric chopsaw

lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097

On Fri, May 7, 2021, 7:18 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24 turnouts
that will go in a yard.  Are there any thoughts for a quick way to do
this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple weeks cutting
a few at a time?

Thanks
Bill Lugg








--
lloyd lehrer


Cutting a large quantity of switch ties

Bill Lugg
 

I've got a situation where I've got to cut switch ties for 24 turnouts that will go in a yard.  Are there any thoughts for a quick way to do this other than sitting in front of a Chopper for multiple weeks cutting a few at a time?

Thanks
Bill Lugg


Re: Murder on the San Juan Express - Good News!

kevin sivils
 

Russ,
 
Hope you enjoy the story!
 
Kevin

On 05/07/2021 1:38 PM Russ Norris <rbnorrisjr@...> wrote:
 
 
Kevin, I picked up a copy from Amazon and am just digging in.  Thanks for the tip.
 
Russ Norris, MMR

On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 1:22 AM kevin sivils < ksivils@...> wrote:
I'd like to thank those of you who picked up a copy of Murder on the San Juan Express! It hit #1 in the category of Railroad Fiction on Amazon.

As a heads up in case you haven't picked up a copy and would like to, there will be a price increase on the 22nd of March. The Kindle edition will go up in price to $4.99 and the paperback will go up in price to $12.95. To get a copy use this link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08XYNH47G/


 

 


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Dave Eggleston
 

Thanks Randy! That is mostly what I understood but good to have it all in one place.

Dave

On May 7, 2021, at 12:21 PM, Randy Hees <randyhees@...> wrote:


_._,_._,_


Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Randy Hees
 

"It was more common to find red lead on the wood in contact with iron [...]" is interesting. Does this mean that queen posts or trussrod pad would also be given some paint or lead, and if so, on only the contact side or completely? The truss rods only given lead red where they pierce frame members or along the entire length? Brake wheel and rod unpainted while the holding plate for the rod would be painted? Etc, etc, etc.

 

There are two different issues, 1) any protective painting, much like primer, and 2) the final paint and lettering…

 

I have seen period references to ironwork called out as painted, especially items such as grab irons, but recognize these references as terribly vague. They suggest ironwork got some type of paint coating at times. On this, we tend to think these cars were painted exclusively in red (of some type) and you mention the red on hand in one location. But I've also seen black called out for ironwork by some car builders--any evidence Carter opted to black ironwork in the 1874-1879 period?

 

Finally: trucks. Completely painted or only certain elements? 

 

I think most iron work was painted, if not to protect wood, then because it was visible…  It was most commonly painted the body color, not a contrasting color with refrigerator or other “line cars” being receiving the more detailed paint, so most cars just red…with no documented cases of Carter picking out hardware in a contrasting color…

 

Trucks are more difficult, but I believe that generally on freight cars, just body color…


Randy Hees 


On Fri, May 7, 2021 at 9:59 AM Dave Eggleston via groups.io <degg13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Randy, 

Great comments on how woodwork was addressed. Looking for a bit of clarification of the ironwork painting--or an idea of prevailing understanding based on the limited sources we have to hand in the present. 

"It was more common to find red lead on the wood in contact with iron [...]" is interesting. Does this mean that queen posts or trussrod pad would also be given some paint or lead, and if so, on only the contact side or completely? The truss rods only given lead red where they pierce frame members or along the entire length? Brake wheel and rod unpainted while the holding plate for the rod would be painted? Etc, etc, etc.

I have seen period references to ironwork called out as painted, especially items such as grab irons, but recognize these references as terribly vague. They suggest ironwork got some type of paint coating at times. On this, we tend to think these cars were painted exclusively in red (of some type) and you mention the red on hand in one location. But I've also seen black called out for ironwork by some car builders--any evidence Carter opted to black ironwork in the 1874-1879 period?

Finally: trucks. Completely painted or only certain elements? 

I recall Jim Wilke turning a lot of people's understanding of 1860s-1890s engine painting practices on its head starting in the early 1990s...very exciting and surprising, often against modern expectations and bias. I suspect the same goes for wood cars. 

Thanks
Dave




Re: Murder on the San Juan Express - Good News!

Russ Norris
 

Kevin, I picked up a copy from Amazon and am just digging in.  Thanks for the tip.

Russ Norris, MMR


On Thu, Mar 18, 2021 at 1:22 AM kevin sivils <ksivils@...> wrote:
I'd like to thank those of you who picked up a copy of Murder on the San Juan Express! It hit #1 in the category of Railroad Fiction on Amazon.

As a heads up in case you haven't picked up a copy and would like to, there will be a price increase on the 22nd of March. The Kindle edition will go up in price to $4.99 and the paperback will go up in price to $12.95. To get a copy use this link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08XYNH47G/



--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Dave Eggleston
 

Randy, 

Great comments on how woodwork was addressed. Looking for a bit of clarification of the ironwork painting--or an idea of prevailing understanding based on the limited sources we have to hand in the present. 

"It was more common to find red lead on the wood in contact with iron [...]" is interesting. Does this mean that queen posts or trussrod pad would also be given some paint or lead, and if so, on only the contact side or completely? The truss rods only given lead red where they pierce frame members or along the entire length? Brake wheel and rod unpainted while the holding plate for the rod would be painted? Etc, etc, etc.

I have seen period references to ironwork called out as painted, especially items such as grab irons, but recognize these references as terribly vague. They suggest ironwork got some type of paint coating at times. On this, we tend to think these cars were painted exclusively in red (of some type) and you mention the red on hand in one location. But I've also seen black called out for ironwork by some car builders--any evidence Carter opted to black ironwork in the 1874-1879 period?

Finally: trucks. Completely painted or only certain elements? 

I recall Jim Wilke turning a lot of people's understanding of 1860s-1890s engine painting practices on its head starting in the early 1990s...very exciting and surprising, often against modern expectations and bias. I suspect the same goes for wood cars. 

Thanks
Dave




Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Randy Hees
 

General railroad paint practice (generally from the 1880-1895 period) called for all wood (except the deck?) to be painted, especially the mortise and tenons,  Sample construction specifications called for three coats.  Additionally mortises were to be packed with white lead, and all iron parts and any wood surface in contact with iron was to be painted with red lead.  That being said, in nearly every early narrow gauge car I have examined, the underbody was only painted where it would show.  It was more common to find red lead on the wood in contact with iron, than painting the non visible wood parts of the underframe.  I note that if cars were delivered unpainted, there might be photos showing unpainted, unlettered cars, and to my knowledge all photos of early operations show painted, lettered cars.

I would caution all about using modern practice (unpainted engine blocks) for early, 19th century practice...   As recently as the 1980's engine blocks were painted.  Painting was important in the railroad industry, with its own "Master Painters Association"

Randy Hees



Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

kevin b
 

Speaking of colors, I’ve been experimenting this week with deck colorization.  The darkest deck was an initial, just wing it attempt.  The other two were colored after refreshing my memory on the appearance of raw and aged  Doug Fir.
Kent Hinton

i see nothing at all wrong with any of the 3 colors. newer cars look newer, older cars look older,,,,, in my opinion, variation of color is a good thing.
unless you're going to claim every car was  sent through the shop and now they're all the same color.
KEVIN.


> John, I agree with you on paint application. Less paint = few painter hours = less cost. And likely viewed as unnecessary to paint >areas that would lose paint rapidly anyway.
> Except iron work. I lean to all iron work getting paint as a preventative. These bits were likely the most expensive on the car. Thoughts?
> Dave

i ran the question of painted/ unpainted carter bros cars past a very knowledgeable friend of mine.
he said they definitely painted the high vis areas but spent little time on the bits you never saw.
i failed to ask about the iron parts, which i will next chance i get.
but i can tell you this:
even yet today, things made from cast iron are typically not painted.
for instance:
look at just about any automobile you can find.
raw cast iron cylinder blocks, and heads, (where cast iron heads are used) standard shift transmission cases, (automatic transmissions are cast aluminum, (also not painted) differential housings, brake drums, etc.etc.etc.
cast iron also does not rust away like steel.
personally, i doubt they painted the bits under the car at all.
they might have painted the parts you can't help but see, but i reckon that's for looks, not to preserve the iron.
KEVIN.



Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Kent Hinton
 

Speaking of colors, I’ve been experimenting this week with deck colorization. The darkest deck was an initial, just wing it attempt. The other two were colored after refreshing my memory on the appearance of raw and aged Doug Fir.

Kent Hinton

<degg13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

John, I agree with you on paint application. Less paint = few painter hours = less cost. And likely viewed as unnecessary to paint areas that would lose paint rapidly anyway.

Except iron work. I lean to all iron work getting paint as a preventative. These bits were likely the most expensive on the car. Thoughts?

Dave


Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Dave Eggleston
 

John, I agree with you on paint application. Less paint = few painter hours = less cost. And likely viewed as unnecessary to paint areas that would lose paint rapidly anyway.

Except iron work. I lean to all iron work getting paint as a preventative. These bits were likely the most expensive on the car. Thoughts?

Dave

On May 6, 2021, at 7:57 AM, John Stutz <john.stutz@spcrr.org> wrote:


Then there is the question of where paint was applied:


Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

John Stutz
 

Then there is the question of where paint was applied: 

Underside of any freight cars?
Interior of box & stock cars?
Platform car decks?
Inside of open cars?

All are doubtful, although wooden car era freight car undersides collected enough mud, from pumping ties, that it soon became impossible to tell if there was any paint underneath.   For a much more recent example, I recall inspecting  a tank car at the Sacramento Museum, which had at least 1/8" of mud & dust around the body bolsters. 

John Stutz

On May 6, 2021 6:22 AM Randy Hees <randyhees@...> wrote:

We know that later, The Carters stocked Masury's tuscan red in large quanities in their shop, so Tuscan red is our best guess...

Randy


Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Randy Hees
 

We know that later, The Carters stocked Masury's tuscan red in large quanities in their shop, so Tuscan red is our best guess...

Randy

On Wed, May 5, 2021, 8:21 AM Dave Eggleston via groups.io <degg13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Because of this discussion I dug out my SC&F files and pulled up my digitized photos. A few things stand out that if you do ever build the SC&F boxcars you may wish to consider:  

1. In mid-1994 my roster notes specifically call out the 8T boxcars at 4 stick/2 trussrods and the 8T platforms being 6 stick/4 trussrods which means sometime between 1991 and 1994 I'd had several conversations on Carter cars with the various historians and lead carpenters at SPCRR, both in letters and in person and that was a theoretical ideology of some of them concerning these cars. So my initial comment wasn't entirely crazy. The NCNG circus wreck appeared to put that to sleep within a few years. Yet we still don't have a photo of an upside-down SC&F flat...

2. We DO have a great end shot of an SC&F platform car in front of the SC warehouse c1876 and it sure looks to have 4 truss rods (see Pacificng.com SC&F photos for a great version). Which leads to the theory of 4 trussrods on the boxcars as likely but there's no photo evidence for them since in the best FA Cook photos don't show the lower ends of the boxcars (the Felton flume photo). 

3. I also should point out that there is evidence that the 8T boxcars had lighter side sills than the platforms, again because the boxcars are in essence a truss bridge thanks to their side framing. But the SC&F boxcars don't appear to have been designed as boxcars, they are conversions from platforms. My notes indicate conversations on this with the same group of individuals. 

4. Also looking at good scans of the FA Cook photos of "Santa Cruz" and "Felton" at the Felton flume we see two boxcars with an interesting feature, also seen on photos of a train in the canyon: 4 longitudinal boards, maybe 2x4(?) on the roof, in addition to the center walkway. All boxcars in photos have this unusual feature and I am at a loss as to what they represent.

All this means the six SC&F boxcars offer you several differences (there may be others?) from other 8T Carter cars: The longitudinal roof boards are a given; 4 truss rods seem very likely; heavier side sills very likely; 6 sills is an optional WTF addition. They'd stand out nicely when placed near M&SV, NPC or NCNG cars.

Dave


San Juan Model Co. CONOCO tank cars as on Patterson podcast

John Cytron
 

This afternoon I saw the video podcast of "What's Neat This Week" #154 by Ken Patterson and on it was Bob Stears, who with Doug Junda formed San Juan Model Co. This company (basically these two guys) bought Grandt Line, San Juan Car Co. and a bunch of other companies. It this video podcast Bob showed off the On3/30 and HOn3 CONOCO tall dome tank cars. You can order these on the San Juan Model Co. website. They are really beautiful cars. One interesting point Mr. Stears made was that when they bought Grandt Line and the other companies, they had to move 15 semitrailers of machines, tools, molds and parts to their new location and sort through all of it which took a lot of time. He mentioned that when he and Doug heard about the closing of Grandt Line, they got angry and wanted to make sure that the this maker's products (and the other products of the companies they bought) were not lost. 
     The "What's Neat This Week" podcast can be found  at https://www.facebook.com/WNTWPodcast/. Just click on the link to episode #154 and you will get to the You Tube video or directly for this week https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKEXz9AOBxQ

John


Re: Carter Brothers 24’ 8t Flat

Dave Eggleston
 

Because of this discussion I dug out my SC&F files and pulled up my digitized photos. A few things stand out that if you do ever build the SC&F boxcars you may wish to consider:  

1. In mid-1994 my roster notes specifically call out the 8T boxcars at 4 stick/2 trussrods and the 8T platforms being 6 stick/4 trussrods which means sometime between 1991 and 1994 I'd had several conversations on Carter cars with the various historians and lead carpenters at SPCRR, both in letters and in person and that was a theoretical ideology of some of them concerning these cars. So my initial comment wasn't entirely crazy. The NCNG circus wreck appeared to put that to sleep within a few years. Yet we still don't have a photo of an upside-down SC&F flat...

2. We DO have a great end shot of an SC&F platform car in front of the SC warehouse c1876 and it sure looks to have 4 truss rods (see Pacificng.com SC&F photos for a great version). Which leads to the theory of 4 trussrods on the boxcars as likely but there's no photo evidence for them since in the best FA Cook photos don't show the lower ends of the boxcars (the Felton flume photo). 

3. I also should point out that there is evidence that the 8T boxcars had lighter side sills than the platforms, again because the boxcars are in essence a truss bridge thanks to their side framing. But the SC&F boxcars don't appear to have been designed as boxcars, they are conversions from platforms. My notes indicate conversations on this with the same group of individuals. 

4. Also looking at good scans of the FA Cook photos of "Santa Cruz" and "Felton" at the Felton flume we see two boxcars with an interesting feature, also seen on photos of a train in the canyon: 4 longitudinal boards, maybe 2x4(?) on the roof, in addition to the center walkway. All boxcars in photos have this unusual feature and I am at a loss as to what they represent.

All this means the six SC&F boxcars offer you several differences (there may be others?) from other 8T Carter cars: The longitudinal roof boards are a given; 4 truss rods seem very likely; heavier side sills very likely; 6 sills is an optional WTF addition. They'd stand out nicely when placed near M&SV, NPC or NCNG cars.

Dave


Broad Top Mountain Models HO.HOn3 East Broad Top Car Shop

NarrowMinded1
 

Now available for pre-order!

Broad Top Mountain Models HO.HOn3 East Broad Top Car Shop...

Scale: HO
Description (Courtesy of oldeastie.com):

The Car Shop is one of the largest building in the EBT shops. The original part of the shop is also one of the oldest in the shops complex, but it has been expanded several times to more than twice its original size. It was the primary location where rolling stock of all types were constructed or repaired. In the early decades of the railroad the rolling stock fleet consisted of all wood cars, but staring in the 1910's began to transition to steel. Because of the early wood constitution, the Car Shop is where the power woodworking equipment is located. Even to the end of operations, the passenger cars remained wood along with components of other cars.

The building contains three tracks, two of which run entirely through the building and one that terminates about halfway through. Cars in need of service were spotted on the long lead tracks to the south of the building. A slight grade allowed cars to be gravity switched into the building for work, then gravity switched out the north end. To the north both tracks switched together and crossed over the Orbisonia Scale where rebuilt cars could be weighed and stenciled with their tare (empty) weight. The building is equipped with numerous rivet forges and air lines for riveting of steel cars.Today the building is mainly used for storage of the operable rolling stock during the winter months.

Support the Friends of the East Broad Top! Please visit <https://store.febt.org/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=69_118>to purchase the car shop through the FEBT Company Store!

Features:

    As True to the Prototype As Possible
    Laser Cut Floor
    Laser Cut Interior Framing
    Laser Cut Roof Rafters
    Laser Cut Walls
    Laser Cut Battens
    Laser Cut Doors
    Laser Cut Windows
    Laser Cut Sub Roof
    Corrugated Metal Roofing Material
   
Provisions to be Built as a Stand Alone Structure OR add to the Machine Shop and Boiler House

Footprint: Approx. 24 x 7 Inches

ETA: Early/Late June

MSRP: $250.00 USD  Your Price: $200.00 USD Shipped Insured USPS Priority Mail + 6% PA sales tax for PA residents. International orders ship via insured USPS Priority Mail International at cost.

SPECIAL PRE-ORDER PRICE: $187.50 FOR FIRST 17 ORDERS!

INFO: http://broadtopmountainmodels.com/east-broad-top-car-shop.html

PURCHASE: http://www.nateslightironhobbies.com/store/broadtop-mountain-models/laser-kits/hohon3/east-broad-top-ho/hon3-boiler-house-laser-cut-craftsman-structure-kit-p2270.html
--
Nathan M. Kline
Nate's HOn3 East Broad Top RR & Coal Co.
___________________________________

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVJMoICFWw9Muse6xm8moiQ
MeWe Group: https://mewe.com/group/5fbb79e7edc4177fe935a858
Nate's Light Iron Hobbies: http://nateslightironhobbies.com
Broad Top Mountain Models: http://broadtopmountainmodels.com


American beauty solder station

Andrew Keplinger
 

I have a brand New solder station with accessories 600 value asking 500. More pictures available upon request  contact me off line akep1963@... 

2521 - 2540 of 10757