Date   

Re: Boone Morrison

Randy Hees
 

Boone and his wife lived above the Volcano, away from the lava flow... He was involved with the National Park Service store and visitor center, but did not run it.  They did sell his photographs, primary of traditional hula.

As a friend who had the joy of visiting he and his wife, and staying with them, he was a gentleman, a historian, and just fun to be with.  He was as much a historian as a modeler... We did the "Birth of California Narrow gauge" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xpxjg34gJV0

He was named for his great great grandfather... Daniel Boone... recently (for the last 10 years or so) had been doing French & Indian War reenacting... He had a black powder rifle, which he used both for reenacting but also for hunting Ferrel pigs.  This was an important part of his life... something he thought he should do before he  got too old...  We had been planning a trip to Nevada las December which didn't happen...  I had arraigned throttle time on Eureka for him... we were working on a trip to the Nevada Northern...

He taught me to "talk story"... he introduced me to Hawaii...

I will miss him...

Randy Hees

On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 3:05 PM, Jim Spencer <trainmanjs@...> wrote:
I think Boone also ran the Volcano NP bookstore/gift shop on the Big Island. He’d be out of business right now.
Jim


On Jun 18, 2018, at 10:13 AM, Steven Haworth <haworth7@...> wrote:

Very sad news. I I always loved his work and writing. 

On Mon, Jun 18, 2018, 1:55 AM Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:
I don't know if it has been mentioned here and apologies if it has, but Boone Morrison passed away at his home on 8th April this year. He was 77. He wrote a series of articles in the Gazette about his HOn3 North Pacific Coast RR quite a few years ago before switching to On3. He included some very handy and innovative techniques. He was also an architect and a photographer having studied under Ansel Adams.



Mark K
Oxon England.



Re: Boone Morrison and His collection

Keith Wiseman
 

Hello All,
 
We were also very sorry to hear the news of Our good friend Boone’s passing. Also be advised We will start selling His collection on ebay beginning this week. Many Historical and unique models in His collection as You all know.  Not as large a collection as you might think, but all the models are super nice. 
 
Thanks,

Keith Wiseman
Wiseman Model Services Inc.
898 Blacks Cross Road
Paris KY 40361
859-484-9573
kwiseman@...
www.wisemanmodelservices.com


Re: Boone Morrison

asandrini
 

Mark,

Thank you for mentioning his passing. Although I had only met him one, we used to speak once or twice a week when I had my hobby shop.  When he was modeling in HOn30, I sold him an On30 brass Shay. It turned out to be an old Kemtron Shay and he built a small diorama for it. Soon after, he changed to On30.

Boone lived in Volcano, Hawaii; which has now been evacuated due to the volcanic eruptions.

Al



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S®6 active, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...>
Date: 6/17/18 11:54 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] Boone Morrison

I don't know if it has been mentioned here and apologies if it has, but Boone Morrison passed away at his home on 8th April this year. He was 77. He wrote a series of articles in the Gazette about his HOn3 North Pacific Coast RR quite a few years ago before switching to On3. He included some very handy and innovative techniques. He was also an architect and a photographer having studied under Ansel Adams.



Mark K
Oxon England.


Re: Underbody detailing

jmcqiv@...
 

Martin

As a couple of other members of the group have stated if you can't see it why bother unless it for competition or display.
When I had cars judged for my NMRA Master Builders Cars Certificate the first thing that the judges did was to turn them upside down to look for the full underbody detail.
I have those cars on by layout and they run well but most cars only have what can bee seen.

Remember rule number 1, it's your railroad!

Jim McQueeny MMR477



From: Martin Fischer <Martinfischer8@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 3:05 PM
Subject: [HOn3] Underbody detailing

Group,

currently I‘m kitbashing three gondolas. Part of the project is adding a more detailed brake system using the Grandt Line detail  set.
This leads to my question:

If you look at car kits by eg. Grandt or Precision Scale a lot of time is required to detail the underbody. Once you put the finished car on track this is barely visible.

Probably the decision depends on the number of cars needed. Also competition models are a different thing.

Looking at published photos doesn’t give any clue. Probably everybody showcases the best models on that occasion.

So do you think this is worth it?
Do you detail all cars to the same level?
Do you detail them at all?

Just curious.

Regards
Martin







Re: Underbody detailing

Jim Marlett
 

Being the lazy bum I am, when I have scratch built cars, I do as little as I think I can get away with. It really depends on why you are modeling. Is it to get more cars so you can operate or is it to display them as realistically as possible. It also depends on how much effort you want to put into it. If you are comfortable with a lower level of detail under a car (like me) then don’t beat yourself up about it.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/

On Jun 18, 2018, at 3:00 PM, Martin Fischer <Martinfischer8@t-online.de> wrote:

Group,

currently I‘m kitbashing three gondolas. Part of the project is adding a more detailed brake system using the Grandt Line detail set.
This leads to my question:

If you look at car kits by eg. Grandt or Precision Scale a lot of time is required to detail the underbody. Once you put the finished car on track this is barely visible.

Probably the decision depends on the number of cars needed. Also competition models are a different thing.

Looking at published photos doesn’t give any clue. Probably everybody showcases the best models on that occasion.

So do you think this is worth it?
Do you detail all cars to the same level?
Do you detail them at all?

Just curious.

Regards
Martin





Re: Boone Morrison

Jim Spencer
 

I think Boone also ran the Volcano NP bookstore/gift shop on the Big Island. He’d be out of business right now.
Jim


On Jun 18, 2018, at 10:13 AM, Steven Haworth <haworth7@...> wrote:

Very sad news. I I always loved his work and writing. 

On Mon, Jun 18, 2018, 1:55 AM Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:
I don't know if it has been mentioned here and apologies if it has, but Boone Morrison passed away at his home on 8th April this year. He was 77. He wrote a series of articles in the Gazette about his HOn3 North Pacific Coast RR quite a few years ago before switching to On3. He included some very handy and innovative techniques. He was also an architect and a photographer having studied under Ansel Adams.



Mark K
Oxon England.


Re: Underbody detailing

Lee Gustafson
 

FWIW, Grandt and Precision Scale kits made excellent detail available in kit form. They provided the parts and did the engineering. Yes, the decision depends on the number of cars needed as well as the decision are these cars "contest cars" or "layout cars". Another question who will handle the cars, only you or other "operators" ? It also depends on in your heart and mind what makes you happy. That may not answer your question.

Lee Gustafson


-----Original Message-----
From: Martin Fischer <Martinfischer8@...>
To: HOn3 <HOn3@groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Jun 18, 2018 3:05 pm
Subject: [HOn3] Underbody detailing

Group,

currently I‘m kitbashing three gondolas. Part of the project is adding a more detailed brake system using the Grandt Line detail set.
This leads to my question:

If you look at car kits by eg. Grandt or Precision Scale a lot of time is required to detail the underbody. Once you put the finished car on track this is barely visible.

Probably the decision depends on the number of cars needed. Also competition models are a different thing.

Looking at published photos doesn’t give any clue. Probably everybody showcases the best models on that occasion.

So do you think this is worth it?
Do you detail all cars to the same level?
Do you detail them at all?

Just curious.

Regards
Martin






Re: Uintah 2-6-6-2T

Paul Sturtz
 

Thanks, Tony,  That's high praise coming from you!!  And I'm 73...……….


Re: Underbody detailing

Climax@...
 

I am with Mike. At 71, I still like building wood cars, detest plastic. So my early stuff use to have brake rods, levers, triple value, air cylinder and all that stuff. Nice to model but not necessary. My cars all opearte well, and I have over 350 wood cars that unless you use the out of scale grappling hook and pick them up you cannot tell which one have a full under body or those that don't. With all due respect to John Allen, his attitude was if you can't see it why waste your time building it. Contest models are a different story.
db MMR200

-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Van Hove <vanhovem22@gmail.com>
Sent: Jun 18, 2018 4:13 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Underbody detailing

Group:
I’m 80 years old, and , I like my models to look good, and operate well. Frankly at my age, I don’t think it’s worth the time and trouble to model the underside, which no one but me will ever see. I do put the big brake cylinder on, as that can sort of be seen from the side, but otherwise, I think it’s a waste of time.

Just my 2 cents worth. (with inflation, that should read 3 cents worth, I guess) 🙄

Mike Van Hove

On Jun 18, 2018, at 3:00 PM, Martin Fischer <Martinfischer8@t-online.de> wrote:

Group,

currently I‘m kitbashing three gondolas. Part of the project is adding a more detailed brake system using the Grandt Line detail set.
This leads to my question:

If you look at car kits by eg. Grandt or Precision Scale a lot of time is required to detail the underbody. Once you put the finished car on track this is barely visible.

Probably the decision depends on the number of cars needed. Also competition models are a different thing.

Looking at published photos doesn’t give any clue. Probably everybody showcases the best models on that occasion.

So do you think this is worth it?
Do you detail all cars to the same level?
Do you detail them at all?

Just curious.

Regards
Martin







Re: Underbody detailing

Russ Norris
 

I go with Mike.  I'm 76, and my peepers aren't what they used to be (along with a lot of the rest of me).
If I were to enter a model in a division or regional competition, or if I were going for the car building AP
I would undoubtedly make the effort.  But I'm at the point where my railroading is for my own pleasure.
I mount tension bars, queen posts and the brake cylinder (and maybe the triple valve) but I just don't see
the point of wiring in all the piping.  In my imagnation, I know it's there.

Russ Norris

On Mon, Jun 18, 2018 at 4:13 PM Mike Van Hove <vanhovem22@...> wrote:
Group:
I’m 80 years old, and , I like my models to look good, and operate well.  Frankly at my age, I don’t think it’s worth the time and trouble to model the underside, which no one but me will ever see.  I do put the big brake cylinder on, as that can sort of be seen from the side, but otherwise, I think it’s a waste of time.

Just my 2 cents worth.  (with inflation, that should read 3 cents worth, I guess) 🙄

Mike Van Hove

> On Jun 18, 2018, at 3:00 PM, Martin Fischer <Martinfischer8@...> wrote:
>
> Group,
>
> currently I‘m kitbashing three gondolas. Part of the project is adding a more detailed brake system using the Grandt Line detail  set.
> This leads to my question:
>
> If you look at car kits by eg. Grandt or Precision Scale a lot of time is required to detail the underbody. Once you put the finished car on track this is barely visible.
>
> Probably the decision depends on the number of cars needed. Also competition models are a different thing.
>
> Looking at published photos doesn’t give any clue. Probably everybody showcases the best models on that occasion.
>
> So do you think this is worth it?
> Do you detail all cars to the same level?
> Do you detail them at all?
>
> Just curious.
>
> Regards
> Martin
>
>
>
>
>





Re: Underbody detailing

Mike Van Hove
 

Group:
I’m 80 years old, and , I like my models to look good, and operate well. Frankly at my age, I don’t think it’s worth the time and trouble to model the underside, which no one but me will ever see. I do put the big brake cylinder on, as that can sort of be seen from the side, but otherwise, I think it’s a waste of time.

Just my 2 cents worth. (with inflation, that should read 3 cents worth, I guess) 🙄

Mike Van Hove

On Jun 18, 2018, at 3:00 PM, Martin Fischer <Martinfischer8@t-online.de> wrote:

Group,

currently I‘m kitbashing three gondolas. Part of the project is adding a more detailed brake system using the Grandt Line detail set.
This leads to my question:

If you look at car kits by eg. Grandt or Precision Scale a lot of time is required to detail the underbody. Once you put the finished car on track this is barely visible.

Probably the decision depends on the number of cars needed. Also competition models are a different thing.

Looking at published photos doesn’t give any clue. Probably everybody showcases the best models on that occasion.

So do you think this is worth it?
Do you detail all cars to the same level?
Do you detail them at all?

Just curious.

Regards
Martin





Underbody detailing

Martin Fischer
 

Group,

currently I‘m kitbashing three gondolas. Part of the project is adding a more detailed brake system using the Grandt Line detail set.
This leads to my question:

If you look at car kits by eg. Grandt or Precision Scale a lot of time is required to detail the underbody. Once you put the finished car on track this is barely visible.

Probably the decision depends on the number of cars needed. Also competition models are a different thing.

Looking at published photos doesn’t give any clue. Probably everybody showcases the best models on that occasion.

So do you think this is worth it?
Do you detail all cars to the same level?
Do you detail them at all?

Just curious.

Regards
Martin


Re: Boone Morrison

Steven Haworth
 

Very sad news. I I always loved his work and writing. 


On Mon, Jun 18, 2018, 1:55 AM Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:
I don't know if it has been mentioned here and apologies if it has, but Boone Morrison passed away at his home on 8th April this year. He was 77. He wrote a series of articles in the Gazette about his HOn3 North Pacific Coast RR quite a few years ago before switching to On3. He included some very handy and innovative techniques. He was also an architect and a photographer having studied under Ansel Adams.



Mark K
Oxon England.


Re: Boone Morrison

Climax@...
 

That was quite a legacy to leave behind.  Hopfully his spirit is with the likes of Ansel Adams, and Earnest Hemingway, etc.

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Kasprowicz
Sent: Jun 18, 2018 2:54 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] Boone Morrison

I don't know if it has been mentioned here and apologies if it has, but Boone Morrison passed away at his home on 8th April this year. He was 77. He wrote a series of articles in the Gazette about his HOn3 North Pacific Coast RR quite a few years ago before switching to On3. He included some very handy and innovative techniques. He was also an architect and a photographer having studied under Ansel Adams.



Mark K
Oxon England.


Boone Morrison

Mark Kasprowicz
 

I don't know if it has been mentioned here and apologies if it has, but Boone Morrison passed away at his home on 8th April this year. He was 77. He wrote a series of articles in the Gazette about his HOn3 North Pacific Coast RR quite a few years ago before switching to On3. He included some very handy and innovative techniques. He was also an architect and a photographer having studied under Ansel Adams.



Mark K
Oxon England.


Re: Uintah 2-6-6-2T

tonyk537
 

Great looking loco Paul!


Re: Uintah 2-6-6-2T

Climax@...
 

Doug put in the air tubes through the coal tender part.  You can see them on the rear view of the coal wall.  That was prototype but not on the PFM model.

-----Original Message-----
From: Doug Cummings
Sent: Jun 17, 2018 7:36 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Uintah 2-6-6-2T

May I ask what "improvements" you made to this model. I have two of these models that have never been out of the box and am curious. 
Doug






Re: Uintah 2-6-6-2T

Doug Cummings
 

May I ask what "improvements" you made to this model. I have two of these models that have never been out of the box and am curious. 
Doug






Re: Uintah 2-6-6-2T

Climax@...
 

Excellent work.  I bet it was scary to take a drill to the model to begin with but it turned out excellent.  Congratulations on a fine job. db

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Sturtz
Sent: Jun 17, 2018 7:05 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Uintah 2-6-6-2T

Dave
Here is the final result.  Not as difficult as I thought it would be.  I used 1/16 alum tubing drilled out with a #57 bit.  I'm satisfied with the results.
Paul


Re: Uintah 2-6-6-2T

Paul Sturtz
 

Dave
Here is the final result.  Not as difficult as I thought it would be.  I used 1/16 alum tubing drilled out with a #57 bit.  I'm satisfied with the results.
Paul

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