Date   

Re: What got you in to HOn3?

burrst54
 

Friends, and quality, mainly. I started out in HO as a kid, then switched to N when space was limited after college, then back to HO when the Atlas-Kato drive came out, which was so smooth-running compared to N, I had to go back. HOn3 is right in the sweet spot between them, and friends kept bringing over their locos to play with, so I made a dual-gage yard and a loop of HOn3 to keep them happy. Then Blackstone came out with smooth-running locos, so my interest in HOn3 has expanded.

Burr Stewart
Seattle, WA


Re: San Juan Details Castings!!!

Climax@...
 

Perhaps you should change the subject line to indicate your happiness with their customer service.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dusty
Sent: Jan 21, 2021 7:23 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Beware San Juan Details Castings!!!

Great news! Replacement parts arrived from San Juan to continue box car projects. Excellent job Starla and Doug!

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: San Juan Details Castings!!!

Climax@...
 

Perhaps you should change the subject line to indicate your happiness with their customer service.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dusty
Sent: Jan 21, 2021 7:23 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Beware San Juan Details Castings!!!

Great news! Replacement parts arrived from San Juan to continue box car projects. Excellent job Starla and Doug!

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

hiroechan
 

Craig, et.al

For me, HOn3 is kind of a side project for puttering around with. I grew up in the shadow of the Northeast Corridor (quite literally, as it was across the street from my house), and spent many a day in the 1980's playing hooky from school so my grandfather could take me in to work with him at Zoo tower, where he was the lead operator for many years. I have a ton of bad railfan photos taken from inside the tower, of everything still plying the rails at that time.

Then at around 15 or 16, I discovered Narrow Gauge in the Rockies in a used bookstore. The idea of such diminutive trains and hairpin turns (such as the section in the book on the Uintah) was absolutely fascinating. Then Malcolm Furlow published his articles on the San Juan Central in MR. Since then, my modeling has been multifaceted. 

I still model the Corridor primarily, started the NECHS, and pioneered a variant of Free-Mo that we call Uni-Mo, as we're more welcoming to legacy participants than many Free-Mo groups are. 
But I do appreciate that with HOn3, I can set up a layout in a fraction of the space that the Corridor eats up, such as my living room. (The full Corridor modular layout currently takes about 3000 square feet to set up the whole thing. It's worth it though, to see 14-car Clockers and grimy 140-car freight drags with four GG1's slinking around the 66"R corners. Every single car has a prototypical justification for being there, as appropriate to the time period and location modeled.)

With HOn3, I don't worry about prototypicality quite so much, as I love oddball paint schemes and interesting freight cars. (My HOn3 is also getting catenary, as a pseudo-freelance electrified bridge line west out of Denver to the Pacific Coast, similar to the Milwaukee Road electrified pacific extension. I have eight of the original Grandt Line 23-ton boxcabs with the Faulhaber gearhead motors, that I'm putting pantographs on so I can use them as paired box motors.)

In 2020, I and my team won the Walthers National Model Railroad Build-Off competition, for the Adult Team category, with a module of Crum Lynne station on the Philly-Wilmington stretch of the NEC, set in midsummer 1974.
For 2021, I may enter an HOn3 module instead, depending on the flavors of entry-build-kits they offer this year, required for participation. (There were no HOn3 entries of any kind last year. It would be nice to see some narrow gauge entries; and I bet it would be popular in the public voting portion of the contest.)

--Drew McCann


On Sat, Jan 16, 2021 at 11:21 AM Craig Linn <drgw346@...> wrote:

1). What got you into HOn3?  What appealed to you or what was the driving factor that moved you to HOn3
2). What is the one thing you really love about HOn3?
3). What is the one thing you watch out for in HOn3?

 


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Dusty
 

Ben,

Thank you for the scans. Of course I saw your post after returning to the bench with J/F 89 in hand but thank you very much!!!!!!

Now I have to locate my clear S scale rule. I sure hope the guy who did the article knows his stuff! Just kidding Dave!

I'll cheat on the walls and use scribed styrene but I may sandwich short planks in between the 2 x 6s corners to simulate the alternating boards. Or not. Herein lies the problem. No 1/87 scale 12" scribed.  I can use .125, close but small. These sheds will be on the back side of the trackage so maybe they aren't 'the' primary focal point and .125 scribed will fill the bill. Decisions, decisions.

Thanks again for everyone's generous and gracious contributions!

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Ben Poole
 

Dusty,

I have the online version of the Narrow Gauge & Short Line Gazette and was able to take snapshots of the four pages of the coal shed article.  They are attached.

I hope I am not violating any copyright laws here.

Good luck and stay safe!

Ben Poole
Atlanta


On Thu, Jan 21, 2021 at 11:47 AM Dusty <Dustburm@q.com> wrote:
Mike, That's pretty close to what I'm looking for. There's enough of the critical info for me to get a grip on. I'll put the car unloading doors on the tall side and the 'delivery' doors on the low side. I like the idea of the foundation and floor joists raising the floor up to a good-looking height for trucks or wagons.

Dave, it's gonna take a few minutes to access Jan-Feb 1989 but I'm in hot pursuit.

Thank you everyone for all of your assistance in guiding me to some coal shed plans!

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707



--
Ben Poole
770-231-4718 - mobile


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Dusty
 

Mike, That's pretty close to what I'm looking for. There's enough of the critical info for me to get a grip on. I'll put the car unloading doors on the tall side and the 'delivery' doors on the low side. I like the idea of the foundation and floor joists raising the floor up to a good-looking height for trucks or wagons.

Dave, it's gonna take a few minutes to access Jan-Feb 1989 but I'm in hot pursuit.

Thank you everyone for all of your assistance in guiding me to some coal shed plans!

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

drgw169
 

You might check out pages 62-65 of the NG&SL Gazette January/February 1989 and see if that might be what you are looking for.
Dave Adams


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Jim Marlett
 

I plan to have similar coal sheds on my railroad, but I was just going to take a shot at it. I suspect they varied from shed to shed, so I plan to build them sort of freelance. Luckily, my railroad is a fictitious freelance anyhow.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Jan 20, 2021, at 2:59 PM, Dusty <Dustburm@q.com> wrote:

Something like this but larger. Three or four times larger.

Dusty Burman



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Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Mike Conder
 

Check out the HOn3 Annual, I think 2014 (could be wrong). Cameron Bryars and I did articles onncoal sheds like this, I copied mine from plans for a Rico coal shed from Mike Blazek.  I'd share but they are his business product and that wouldn't be right, bb it I think he sells the plan for a relatively low cost of $18. 


Mike Conder

On Wed, Jan 20, 2021 at 4:29 PM Eric Schrowang <eschrowang@...> wrote:
Guys attached are two photos of the plans for the Monero Coaling station Sa Juan Engineering put out in the 70s. If someone would like a copy I would need to have them scanned into a file. Just as a FYI these are in 1/4 inch scale.

Eric 

On Wed, Jan 20, 2021 at 5:52 PM John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
Dusty

Attached are field notes and 1976 photographs of the WP&Y coal shed at Fraser BC.   Not quite what you are asking for, but similar in function and size.  Backside was plain diagonal sheathing.  This shed has concealed the railroad's Fraser toilets for at least  three decades.

I believe this coal shed not only supplied the section house, but also served as an emergency locomotive and rotary supply.  The pipe brackets, of which most are missing, could hold the doors level.   Coal could first be shoveled onto the doors, and then into the tender.  Clearly not suitable for regular use, but doable. 

Similar, but smaller sheds, show up in historic photographs of several other WP&Y section house complexes.

John Stutz
On January 20, 2021 10:29 AM Dusty <dustburm@q.com> wrote:

Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707

--
Mike Conder


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Eric Schrowang
 

Guys attached are two photos of the plans for the Monero Coaling station Sa Juan Engineering put out in the 70s. If someone would like a copy I would need to have them scanned into a file. Just as a FYI these are in 1/4 inch scale.

Eric 

On Wed, Jan 20, 2021 at 5:52 PM John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
Dusty

Attached are field notes and 1976 photographs of the WP&Y coal shed at Fraser BC.   Not quite what you are asking for, but similar in function and size.  Backside was plain diagonal sheathing.  This shed has concealed the railroad's Fraser toilets for at least  three decades.

I believe this coal shed not only supplied the section house, but also served as an emergency locomotive and rotary supply.  The pipe brackets, of which most are missing, could hold the doors level.   Coal could first be shoveled onto the doors, and then into the tender.  Clearly not suitable for regular use, but doable. 

Similar, but smaller sheds, show up in historic photographs of several other WP&Y section house complexes.

John Stutz
On January 20, 2021 10:29 AM Dusty <dustburm@q.com> wrote:

Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

John Stutz
 

Dusty

Attached are field notes and 1976 photographs of the WP&Y coal shed at Fraser BC.   Not quite what you are asking for, but similar in function and size.  Backside was plain diagonal sheathing.  This shed has concealed the railroad's Fraser toilets for at least  three decades.

I believe this coal shed not only supplied the section house, but also served as an emergency locomotive and rotary supply.  The pipe brackets, of which most are missing, could hold the doors level.   Coal could first be shoveled onto the doors, and then into the tender.  Clearly not suitable for regular use, but doable. 

Similar, but smaller sheds, show up in historic photographs of several other WP&Y section house complexes.

John Stutz

On January 20, 2021 10:29 AM Dusty <dustburm@q.com> wrote:

Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Dusty
 

Something like this but larger. Three or four times larger.

Dusty Burman


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

lloyd lehrer
 

Dusty, you mean like the coal pockets at vance jctn?

lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097

On Wed, Jan 20, 2021, 10:29 AM Dusty <Dustburm@q.com> wrote:
Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


--
lloyd lehrer


Re: Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Eric Schrowang
 

Dusty,
I have San Juan Engineering plans for the D&RG coal tower. They are in O scale and I would need to have them scanned to a file. Let me know if these work for you.

Eric

On Wed, Jan 20, 2021, 13:29 Dusty <Dustburm@q.com> wrote:
Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Desperately seeking Coal Shed Plan

Dusty
 

Seeking a SW Colorado narrow guage type coal shed plan. Like a commercial sized (15 or 20ish x 30 or 40) track side, shovel it in from the gon, load it out of the doors on the other side type structure. Single plane roof. External cut studs or round poles. The kind you might see in a group of 1 or 2 or 3 or 4.

I'd prefer a 'scholarship' (free) plan if possible.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Mark Lewis
 

Scott,

What a GREAT story!
Thank you for sharing....

Mark Lewis
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.


On Tue, Jan 19, 2021 at 6:43 PM Scott McLeod <rgsmodeler@...> wrote:

How does a 16 year-old from the Twin-Cities in Minnesota discover HOn3?  The beginning part of my train story is probably vert similar to many on this list.  I’ll bet the ending is pretty unique however.

 

My first exposure to trains was my mother taking me as a 4 year-old in 1961 on the NP passenger train between St. Paul and Minneapolis.  I have pictures of her and I as we await the passenger train to leave the St. Paul Union depot.  All I really remember was that everything was really big!  The buildings, the green trains and the men working.  I must have had fun because I’ve got a big smile in all the pictures.

 

My first exposure to model trains was as a 12 year-old back in the late 1960s when my father and mother gave me a HO Tyco Train Set for Christmas.  That led to the purchase of a couple of HO Rivarossi steam locomotives over the next couple of years.  I learned that model trains were expensive!  My limited budget was quickly redirected at building military models.

 

I also had a couple of relatives that worked for the Great Northern Railroad.

 

One worked as a machinist at the GN Dale Street Shops which was about a half a mile from where I grew up.  I never had the nerve to ask my uncle to see inside the massive buildings.  I wish I had, but what does a youngster know?  Anyways I got to see numerous GN locomotives every time I walked by the large complex.

 

The other worked at the GN Jackson Street Yard which was about two miles from where I lived.  Somehow I got to ride in a SW1500 switcher as the switch crew classified in the yard.  What I remember is some talk going on between my uncle and the engineer about avoiding ‘The Yardmaster’.  The other was looking through the cab window and seeing nothing but the ends of boxcars as we banged about the yard.  That was fun none-the-less.  I briefly remember meeting crews in the Yard Office.

 

As a teenager, trains were stored away in a box as my interests were more on chasing girls and sports.

 

As a 16 year-old, I was dating a girl and after about 6 months of dating, on one of my visits to her home I asked her why her dad never came out of the basement when I visited?  She responded with ‘Oh, he’s down there playing with his trains’.  I said ‘I’ll be right back’ and headed down to the basement to see what that was all about.  I get down there and sure enough, he has a model railroad in his basement and he’s working away at it.  Immediately I recognized him from one of my trips to one of the local hobby shops in St. Paul and say ‘Hey, you’re the guy from the hobby shop’.  ‘Yes’ he acknowledged.  It turns out I had earlier visited ‘John’s Train Shop’ in St. Paul hoping to find some military models.  There were only a couple of military kits, but tons and tons of trains.  On his model railroad were plenty of familiar railroads represented with the primary one being the Great Northern.  As I looked about, pretty soon I discovered some much smaller trains on smaller tracks lettered for the Deerwood Tomah & Ironton which I had never heard of.  He explains that they are narrow gauge trains and that they are lettered for his private railroad and that the real ones come from Colorado, Pennsylvania and Alaska.  Wow doesn’t that sound exotic I thought.  After looking them over for a while, I exclaim that I liked these ones the best.  What I liked was a D&RGW K-27 and K-28 circa mid-60s PFM jobs.

 

I’ll turn the clock ahead 3 years and low and behold that girl, who was my high school sweetheart and I were married.  My first Christmas gift from my father-in-law was a copy of Mallory Hope Farrell’s ‘Silver San Juan’.  That was that, the narrow gauge bug had bitten and the RGS it was!  I’ve been a modeler of the RGS and the D&RGW since 1977.  I was able to enjoy building three different HOn3 layouts, one at his home and two at my home with my now late father-in-law who passed away in 1995.  In the early 1980s, he introduced me to the narrow gauge club here in the Twin Cities named ‘Twin Cities Narrow Gaugers’ (we hosted the 2018 National Narrow Gauge convention here in the Twin Cities).  I met a number of people that were real nice and turned into life long friends.  Since his passing, and now 43 years later, I’m now on my third and final layout of the RGS.  I’ve never tired of narrow gauge and all of the neat stuff!

 

Scott McLeod

HOn3 RGS/D&RGW Ridgway - Durango

 

 


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Scott McLeod
 

How does a 16 year-old from the Twin-Cities in Minnesota discover HOn3?  The beginning part of my train story is probably vert similar to many on this list.  I’ll bet the ending is pretty unique however.

 

My first exposure to trains was my mother taking me as a 4 year-old in 1961 on the NP passenger train between St. Paul and Minneapolis.  I have pictures of her and I as we await the passenger train to leave the St. Paul Union depot.  All I really remember was that everything was really big!  The buildings, the green trains and the men working.  I must have had fun because I’ve got a big smile in all the pictures.

 

My first exposure to model trains was as a 12 year-old back in the late 1960s when my father and mother gave me a HO Tyco Train Set for Christmas.  That led to the purchase of a couple of HO Rivarossi steam locomotives over the next couple of years.  I learned that model trains were expensive!  My limited budget was quickly redirected at building military models.

 

I also had a couple of relatives that worked for the Great Northern Railroad.

 

One worked as a machinist at the GN Dale Street Shops which was about a half a mile from where I grew up.  I never had the nerve to ask my uncle to see inside the massive buildings.  I wish I had, but what does a youngster know?  Anyways I got to see numerous GN locomotives every time I walked by the large complex.

 

The other worked at the GN Jackson Street Yard which was about two miles from where I lived.  Somehow I got to ride in a SW1500 switcher as the switch crew classified in the yard.  What I remember is some talk going on between my uncle and the engineer about avoiding ‘The Yardmaster’.  The other was looking through the cab window and seeing nothing but the ends of boxcars as we banged about the yard.  That was fun none-the-less.  I briefly remember meeting crews in the Yard Office.

 

As a teenager, trains were stored away in a box as my interests were more on chasing girls and sports.

 

As a 16 year-old, I was dating a girl and after about 6 months of dating, on one of my visits to her home I asked her why her dad never came out of the basement when I visited?  She responded with ‘Oh, he’s down there playing with his trains’.  I said ‘I’ll be right back’ and headed down to the basement to see what that was all about.  I get down there and sure enough, he has a model railroad in his basement and he’s working away at it.  Immediately I recognized him from one of my trips to one of the local hobby shops in St. Paul and say ‘Hey, you’re the guy from the hobby shop’.  ‘Yes’ he acknowledged.  It turns out I had earlier visited ‘John’s Train Shop’ in St. Paul hoping to find some military models.  There were only a couple of military kits, but tons and tons of trains.  On his model railroad were plenty of familiar railroads represented with the primary one being the Great Northern.  As I looked about, pretty soon I discovered some much smaller trains on smaller tracks lettered for the Deerwood Tomah & Ironton which I had never heard of.  He explains that they are narrow gauge trains and that they are lettered for his private railroad and that the real ones come from Colorado, Pennsylvania and Alaska.  Wow doesn’t that sound exotic I thought.  After looking them over for a while, I exclaim that I liked these ones the best.  What I liked was a D&RGW K-27 and K-28 circa mid-60s PFM jobs.

 

I’ll turn the clock ahead 3 years and low and behold that girl, who was my high school sweetheart and I were married.  My first Christmas gift from my father-in-law was a copy of Mallory Hope Farrell’s ‘Silver San Juan’.  That was that, the narrow gauge bug had bitten and the RGS it was!  I’ve been a modeler of the RGS and the D&RGW since 1977.  I was able to enjoy building three different HOn3 layouts, one at his home and two at my home with my now late father-in-law who passed away in 1995.  In the early 1980s, he introduced me to the narrow gauge club here in the Twin Cities named ‘Twin Cities Narrow Gaugers’ (we hosted the 2018 National Narrow Gauge convention here in the Twin Cities).  I met a number of people that were real nice and turned into life long friends.  Since his passing, and now 43 years later, I’m now on my third and final layout of the RGS.  I’ve never tired of narrow gauge and all of the neat stuff!

 

Scott McLeod

HOn3 RGS/D&RGW Ridgway - Durango

 

 


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Curtis Brookshire
 

Craig, I wish you well with your presentation. By the time the group is finished, you'll have a mountain (HO scale of course) of data to parse. To answer your questions:

1. I like to say that I've loved trains since I was old enough to say "choo choo". Got Lionel trains for Christmas when I was 3 (1961), first HO scale set when I was 9. HOn3 was not a direct path though. I lived in Northern NJ until the summer before my senior year of high school and saw a lot of GG1s on the PRR/PC as well as Erie-Lackawanna local freights and commuter trains, so that area is what I originally chose to model. My introduction to Narrow Gauge came just before I turned 5. I made my acquaintance with Tweetsie Railroad in 1963. I was instantly entranced by a real live steam locomotive, especially the Walshearts valve gear. I still enjoy watching the eccentric crank chasing the main rod in its perpetual dance. Our ticket stubs told the story of a narrow gauge that ran between Boone NC and Johnson City TN that was washed away by the (1940) flood and saved for us to ride again. So I've always had a special place for the ET&WNC and the Blue Ridge Mountains. The high point of many summer vacations to North Carolina was the train ride near Blowing Rock, even after I outgrew the Western show. I wanted to learn more about the ET but didn't know where to begin. I joined the Army right out of high school and served 22 years. After a tour in Germany, I reenlisted for a new occupational speciality, training at Lowry Air Force Base, located in Denver. I volunteered at the Colorado Railroad Museum and found a much larger narrow gauge world. I discovered books that covered the ET&WNC giving me a first glimpse into the real railroad behind the Tweetsie nickname. I also discovered HOn3 at the Aurora location of Pro Custom Hobbies. I seriously considered a brass 346, which I had the pleasure of operating at the CRRM and the RGS caboose 0404, which I slept in during steam-up weekends that summer. Never got the 346, but still have (unbuilt of course) the E&B valley 0404. I didn't get into HOn3 then because as a single enlisted man, I lived in the barracks where space was at at premium. I was able to find local model RR clubs in Virginia, California and Maryland, but they were always standard, oops I mean broad gauge. I visited Tweetsie for the first time in several years in 1980, met Master Mechanic Frank Coffey who restored the locomotives used at the park and taught a new generation how to maintain steam. I also purchased a copy of Mal Ferrell's Tweetsie Country, which became my "bible" of information of the ET for almost 10 years. Right after I arrived in Italy came what I call the landmark July 1981 issue of Model Railroader which highlighted narrow gauge and featured the ET&WNC as "A Railroad You Can Model" including plans for an ET&WNC freight. This issue also caught the interest of two Missourians: John Waite who founded the current ET&WNCRR Historical Society and Dean Smith who is a world-class modeler and who built a comprehensive ET&WNC layout as there exists in his basement. Two years later MR published a series on a Malcolm Furlow designed project HOn3 layout that was 8'x10', designed to be movable called the San Juan Central. Around the same time the Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette published a series of articles about building the ET&WNC freight cars from the July 81 MR. I was paying attention, but still not committed because - no layout possibilities. After years of trying, I finally got stationed at Lowry AFB in 1990. The Denver area housing market was about to rise from the trough it had been since the oil glut of the 1980s and I was able to buy a small house with a basement. God has a sense of humor and just a year after I got to Colorado and after being told "buy a house - you'll be here for a while", Lowry came up on the 1991 Base Closure List. So after some consideration as to what to build in the basement, I decided to jump into HOn3 and use the San Juan Central track plan and adapt it to the ET&WNC. The MR series was a comprehensive "how to" and included everything from benchwork to scenery. The layout survived two moves and I recycled some lumber into my current layout. A challenge in 1990 was equipment as there were no ET prototype models yet available in HO scale. Power and rolling stock would have to be adapted, a story I'm sure many who model outside the narrow gauge mainstream have to do. I bought a RGS 20 at the NNGC in Colorado Springs and a friend of mine refused to let me desecrate a factory painted engine so he traded me an older tender-drive RGS 20 which we modified into ET&WNC first 8. I acquired a RGS 42 which I still plan to convert into an ET #4. The motor is bad, so I have to repower so it waits. What I really wanted was the ET&WNC's signature power: cap stacked Baldwin 4-6-0s. It would be a long wait, I saga I can tell if anyone's interested. It would not be until 2009 and a lot of work by Johnny Graybeal and a deal with Train and Trooper owners Matt and Martha that we got our ET&WNC 4-6-0s. I currently live in Eastern North Carolina (where we have no basements) and am working on an ET layout in an 11'x21' "bonus room" above my garage. I do have two Blackstone 2-8-0s but I plan to use the rest of what I have also. I've equipped a couple of my T&T 4-6-0s with Loc sound ECU decoders, which I absolutely love. Gotta build more Fast Tracks switches since the Shinohara switches from the other layout don't play well with my DCC system.

2. I like to operate and something I learned about HO standard, uh BROAD gauge steam is that they don't pull as many cars as their 12" to the foot prototypes. I've always been totally disgusted about how well those darn diesels run and how well they pull. Well narrow gauge trains don't need to be long. A 4-8-4 pulling 8 cars looks kind of odd, but an 8 car narrow gauge train looks just right. ET passenger trains were 2-4 cars long, if they weren't mixed trains. That's the ONE thing.

To add more, I love the fact that you can fit more layout in a smaller space. I'll bet a lot of us wish we had more room, but I'm able to fit a nice layout in the space I have. The ET&WNC features beautiful Blue Ridge Mountain scenery, a large iron mine, logging operations, coal docks and even oil dealers. While I love the EBT, Colorado roads, SPNG and others my heart is in Appalachia. That's probably how I survived living in Colorado without becoming addicted to modeling the Rio Grande/RGS/C&S etc.

3. I'm always looking for new offerings for ET models. HO equipment started appearing shortly after I started by small layout in Colorado. Trout Creek produced ET&WNC gondolas around 1991, Jim King produced resin hopper kits,  David Hoffman offered several ET freight cars using brass castings and wood as well as a conversion kit for the FEBT Laconia Coach. Les Walker produced laser cut models of two ET depots and two engine houses. A Boone depot kit was offered by Chris Jesse and Kingmill Models. More recently we've seen an explosion of 3d printed kits from Western-Rails and new kits of the Cranberry Depot, church and General Store by Carolina Craftsman, as well as wood kits of boxcars, gons and flatcars from Mount Blue.

Best wishes to all. Hope to hear more stories,
Curtis Brookshire
Pine Level NC


Re: Members of HOn3chat that live in the EU

Mark Kasprowicz
 

This is the second time this guy has placed this request on this forum. I replied the first time when we were within the EU offering to help. He was going to check with the German company to see if they'd send to the UK, presumably to forward to the US. I never heard from him again.
Waste of time.

Mark K
Oxon England

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