Date   

Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Brian Kopp
 

Craig,
my responses below:

1) My grandfather bought me an HO set in about 1969 when I was 5. I built small 4x8 HO layouts as a boy. Then in college in the fall of 1983 I rode the Cumbres and Toltec. That converted me to Hon3.

2) Being an engineer I love the unique technological ingenuity and achievement in the face of natural and often financial challenges that narrow gauge railroads represent. I also think the precarious center of gravity issues with narrow gauge just look really cool..... =)

3) Cost is the biggest hurdle that I see. Even if you kitbash a used $5 plastic HO box car, the trucks you add are $9 and up, the couplers are $3 and up, and the decals are $6 and up. So a low end rolling stock car cost is still over $20.  Also the absence of HOn3 trainsets (Christmas and otherwise) vs the availability of On30 trainsets keeps kids and younger train enthusiasts interested in narrow gauge from refreshing the HOn3 fan-base.
 
--
Brian Kopp
Jacksonville, FL


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Philip Taylor
 

Craig 

I am primarily an O Scaler who dabbles in other scales.  I started collecting and playing with HOn3 after Blackstone got into the market as prior to that time there was only brass and that needed major work or major money to run right which is similar to the story in HO Standard gauge.  Blackstone ran like Swiss watches out the box and the price was not irrational for what some call “Plastic Brass”. High detail and High Reliability.  Best of both worlds. Prior to Blackstone HOn3 had all the functionality of pre Kato N Scale steam and non of the advantages of HO.  Hence the appeal of Sn3 or On30.

I love what I can fit into an HOn3 layout with both short trains and shorter cars.  

The one thing I am on the lookout for in HOn3 would be Blackstone marking a 4-6-0 similar to the FC&C/RGS/ETWNC locomotives.  Something reliable and DCC friendly.  

Philip Taylor


Re: White pass decals

Robert Bell
 

sure, when I get home from work today...

Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC




On Monday, January 18, 2021, 11:50:01 AM EST, Robert Veefkind via groups.io <snookdust@...> wrote:



Rob Bell   I tried to e mail you but it failed. Can you send me your info on decals and any info on # 70-71    thanks    Bob Veefkind   snookdust@...


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Jack Eyster
 

i started in HO in the mid 70's as a teen as it seemed to be the most common scale.  I recall checking out a book from the library, "Narrow Gauge Nostalgia" by George Turner, and in it there was one narrow gage line that really called out to me, the Diamond & Caldor Ry.  This line was just over 30 miles long and ran 2 and 3 truck Shays.  Up to this point, I really wasn't into steam engines, but once I saw pictures of these Shays, I was obsessed with them and this line.  Back then, we didn't have the internet, so the only reference I had was Narrow Gauge Nostalgia, and El Dorado Narrow Gauge: The Diamond & Caldor Railway by Mallory Hope Ferrell.

What got me into HOn3 was the D&C was narrow gage, and I could still use some of my buildings, details, etc that I already have.

The one thing that I love about HOn3 was the challenge.  Unlike HO, there didn't seem to be much ready to run cars and engines.  Everything for the D&C was going to have to be either scratch built, or modified from existing equipment.

The one thing to watch out for is your track work must be flawless as the lighter, smaller engines and cars are less forgiving. 
 
Jack Eyster 



On Mon, Jan 18, 2021 at 3:11 PM captaindavekrembs via groups.io <captaindavekrembs=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here in Northern Wisconsin we had the Thunder Lake RR narrow gauge. We have engine #5 and the business coach at the Rhinelnder Museum.

On Monday, January 18, 2021, 10:14:34 AM CST, Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:


I guess mine is the same old story. Always interested in train from as early as I can remember. Then I forgot all about model railroads from about high school until I was in the Army. I was stationed in Colorado Springs and being poor as church mice, for entertainment my wife and I would drive the roads in the mountains behind the Springs. I remarked that they looked like abandoned railroad grades. My wife bought a little booklet on the railroads of Cripple Creek that confirmed I was right. Next thing you know I’m showing up at the local hobby shop, Lemle’s Roundhouse. I still was doing standard gauge until visiting Chama (1971) and riding the Silverton train. The hook was set and after getting out of the Army I converted the little switching layout to narrow gauge and started my narrow gauge empire (that’s a joke) back in Kansas. We spent many summer vacations camping along the Rio Grande Southern when our kids were growing up and if that doesn’t stoke the narrow gauge fires, nothing will. I’ve had many hiatuses through the years as kids and other interests displaced model railroading, but when I retired and moved to a different house, I began working in earnest again.

The thing I like about HOn3 is it has some of the advantages of N scale while still being HO scale and short trains are the norm.  I also like mountain scenery.

The things to look out for are the same as for any scale and gauge, except that you are likely to become a zealot for narrow gauge.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/








Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Ken Vandevoort
 

I believe the first time I saw a real 3 ft. railroad was during a family vacation to Arizona and we came back through Durango.  We didn't ride the Silverton.  My guess is that my parents couldn't afford it.  Another family vacation to Colorado in 1967 two weeks before I left for Air Force basic training took us to Golden and the Colorado Railroad Museum.  I got to see it, bought some souvenirs and even visited with Robert W. Richardson.  We spent a night in Durango and I went trackside when nobody was around and watched one of the last freight trains come in from Alamosa.  My first Air Force assignment after basic was 20 miles outside of Boston.  I was lucky enough to get a roommate who was also a model railroader.  He took me to all the hobby shops in eastern Massachusetts that we could find.  He also took me to Edaville and that was my first narrow gauge train ride.  I believe that I was stationed there when my parents sent me Narrow Gauge in the Rockies for Christmas.  Have you noticed how often that book has come up in these responses?  Years later, I went to grad school in Glendale, Arizona and drove through Durango on the way down.  I only stopped long enough for the McDonalds with a narrow gauge view.  During Easter break in grad school, my roommate and I took a four day trip that included tracing much of the Rio Grande Southern and stops in Silverton and Durango.  Years later, I am married and my wife and I went to the 1990 NMRA national convention in Pittsburgh.  One of the most fun trips was on the East Broad Top and we rode the caboose.  From 2008 to 2018, we lived one block away from the Midwest Central in Mount Pleasant, Iowa.  Where else could you see a West Side Lumber shay go by just by looking out your bedroom window?  I still live in the same county (Henry) and at one time there were three narrow gauge common carrier railroads in this county.

I may have bought my first LaBelle kit while in the Air Force.  Over the years, I acquired more HOn3 kits for the EBT, Colorado roads and probably some others.  The only motive power is a MDC shay.  Not of the kits or the structures have been built.  That is about to change.  I also have left over material from two brick and mortar hobby shops I once owned at different times.  I found some dual gauge track, a dozen pieces of HOn3 flex track, three switches and two dual gauge transition tracks.  I am building a new HO layout in a new house and decided to incorporate HOn3.  It will be point to point with Rico station on one end and Coles station on the other.  I use what I got, so the EBT timber transfer, Saltillo water tank and EBT sanding tower will also be included somewhere.  My HOn3 railroad name will be Day Late and Dollar Short Line.  I bought the lettering decals years ago from Champ.

It is becoming a reality as I have been installing the subroadbed and working on scenery.  I will probably start laying roadbed tomorrow., then track, then wire it and then ballast.  Hopefully I will have something to put on the rails shortly.  I just love the look of those narrow rails.

Ken Vandevoort


Re: White Pass & Yukon decals

Dale Buxton
 

They can be! You just apply the entire CDS sheet to a blank Microscale decal sheet and then overspray them with Microscale clear decal film. Walla! Now you have a decal.

But I hear you. I which CDS had made decals too.

Dale Buxton

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 14:00 Robert Bell via groups.io <ionhoss=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dave,
CDS was a Canadian based company.  CDS closed up shop and retired maybe 15 -20 years ago I think.  It was my understanding that Ozark Miniatures had bought the artwork and rights, but I could be wrong.  I always wished that the artwork for the dry transfers could have been turned into decals.

Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC




On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 09:56:59 AM EST, Climax@... <climax@...> wrote:


In reference to dry transfers, I had heard someplace that the chemicals that are used in them are now on the endangered list, hazardous, or what ever, which has basically stopped production by those who made them.  If they were made in California I can say that for sure as they ban everything from Ketchup to Mustard if someone doesn't like it.
It would stand to reason that items like that could be made where humanity and politicians are not stacked up on top of each other and get yet get the job done with very little harm done to the environment.  I guess I am just an old fuddy-duddy and have more or less ignored those repressive limitations over the last 73 years and am still on my own two feet.
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: "Robert Veefkind via groups.io"
Sent: Jan 17, 2021 9:29 AM
To: hon3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] White Pass & Yukon decals

Thanks Rob   the cds decals dried up and (to me ) are useless. I emailed Republic and no answer yet. Have you ever seen the PFM model of # 70 ?  Thanks esp.John and others for the help   Bob V.
 
In a message dated 1/17/2021 4:41:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, ionhoss=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
 
Ozark Miniatures had the CDS line listed up until about a year or so ago, and the link is still there on their website.  I had ordered several sets from them just a couple of years ago, although they did not keep the line of dry transfers running.  I had assumed that they bought the line of dry transfers.  I attempted to make contact via email about a year ago and never got a response.
 
Republic Locomotive Works has WP&YR decals - only in white - and they ship fast.
 
Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC
 
 
 
On Saturday, January 16, 2021, 04:10:41 PM EST, John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
 
 
Bob
 
CDS Dry Transfers and Robert Sloan Decals were the primary sources of WP&Y lettering.  Both are now long gone, but they occasionally turn up on EBay.
 
Republic Locomotive Works is the only source I know of that currently offers White Pass decals < ">https://www.republiclocomotiveworks.com>.  Republic is basically an N scale narrow gauge supplier, but their decals are available in N, HO, S & O.  This is possibly the widest range of narrow gauge lines currently available, although otherwise often fairly generic.  I believe that these are the Bob Sloan artwork.  See pages 10 & 11 of their listing for White Pass freight, slogans and heralds.
 
A quick scan also finds WestSide, EBT, D&RG, DSP&P, CCR, UPD&G, SR&RL, ET&WNC, OR&W/PRR, generic passenger, Pacific Coast, D&RGW, Mears roads, NCNG, NC&O, Uintah, logging roads, Sumpter Valley, SPNG, Nevada & California, Carson & Colorado, WP&Y, SPC, NPC, North Shore, Gramps tank, Conoco tanck, RGS Goose, D&RGW San Juan train.  Note that their web listing is a bit flaky: you cannot simply go back, but must use their previous, next, or page number links.
 
Labelle also offers freight car decals covering their surprisingly wide range of narrow gauge kits.
 
San Juan Models is mostly Colorado prototype, but also offers a few out of state lines.
 
Not a direct source, but Bill Mosteller of Great Model Railroad Decals < " data-mce-href="https://www.greatdecals.com/>">https://www.greatdecals.com/> has tried to compile a list of all suppliers <https://www.greatdecals.com/Decals.html>.
 
John Stutz
On January 16, 2021 9:02 AM Robert Veefkind via groups.io <snookdust=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
 
 

Are they available for hon3 ? Microscale and Thinfilm do not list them.   Bob veefkind


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

captaindavekrembs
 

Here in Northern Wisconsin we had the Thunder Lake RR narrow gauge. We have engine #5 and the business coach at the Rhinelnder Museum.

On Monday, January 18, 2021, 10:14:34 AM CST, Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:


I guess mine is the same old story. Always interested in train from as early as I can remember. Then I forgot all about model railroads from about high school until I was in the Army. I was stationed in Colorado Springs and being poor as church mice, for entertainment my wife and I would drive the roads in the mountains behind the Springs. I remarked that they looked like abandoned railroad grades. My wife bought a little booklet on the railroads of Cripple Creek that confirmed I was right. Next thing you know I’m showing up at the local hobby shop, Lemle’s Roundhouse. I still was doing standard gauge until visiting Chama (1971) and riding the Silverton train. The hook was set and after getting out of the Army I converted the little switching layout to narrow gauge and started my narrow gauge empire (that’s a joke) back in Kansas. We spent many summer vacations camping along the Rio Grande Southern when our kids were growing up and if that doesn’t stoke the narrow gauge fires, nothing will. I’ve had many hiatuses through the years as kids and other interests displaced model railroading, but when I retired and moved to a different house, I began working in earnest again.

The thing I like about HOn3 is it has some of the advantages of N scale while still being HO scale and short trains are the norm.  I also like mountain scenery.

The things to look out for are the same as for any scale and gauge, except that you are likely to become a zealot for narrow gauge.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/








White pass decals

Robert Veefkind
 


Rob Bell   I tried to e mail you but it failed. Can you send me your info on decals and any info on # 70-71    thanks    Bob Veefkind   snookdust@...


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Jim Marlett
 

I guess mine is the same old story. Always interested in train from as early as I can remember. Then I forgot all about model railroads from about high school until I was in the Army. I was stationed in Colorado Springs and being poor as church mice, for entertainment my wife and I would drive the roads in the mountains behind the Springs. I remarked that they looked like abandoned railroad grades. My wife bought a little booklet on the railroads of Cripple Creek that confirmed I was right. Next thing you know I’m showing up at the local hobby shop, Lemle’s Roundhouse. I still was doing standard gauge until visiting Chama (1971) and riding the Silverton train. The hook was set and after getting out of the Army I converted the little switching layout to narrow gauge and started my narrow gauge empire (that’s a joke) back in Kansas. We spent many summer vacations camping along the Rio Grande Southern when our kids were growing up and if that doesn’t stoke the narrow gauge fires, nothing will. I’ve had many hiatuses through the years as kids and other interests displaced model railroading, but when I retired and moved to a different house, I began working in earnest again.

The thing I like about HOn3 is it has some of the advantages of N scale while still being HO scale and short trains are the norm. I also like mountain scenery.

The things to look out for are the same as for any scale and gauge, except that you are likely to become a zealot for narrow gauge.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Joe Schroeder
 

Craig,

Mine was simple....in my teens I enjoyed building wood rolling stock kits since my teens; LaBelle, Ambroid, Northeastern...In 1980, the military moved me fronm Washington, DC to Califorinia, and I got to visit the Colorado Railroad Museum, Durango, and Laws, CA.  Then I found a Tomalco HOn3 idler flat kit (I started small)...then a boxcar....then a gondola....I admired the work written up in NG&SL Gazzette....Love the craftsmanship.

Joe Schroeder


Members of HOn3chat that live in the EU

Climax@...
 

I have a special request for a member of the HOn3chat group, if they are wiling to help.  Please contact me at Climax@....

"Mule"

Dave


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Mick Moignard
 

My start in Hon3 was in the late 1970s. I was still at that point living with my parents in Solihull (part of the Birmingham, UK conurbation).  I'd fiddled with modelling the Highland Railway in LMS days in OO scale, bit has always had a narrow gauge interest,and in the mid-70s drifted into 009, but the main issue with 009 at the time was that it didn't run well, if it ran at all. I was also much more interested in main-line narrow gauge, but most 009 at the time was biased towards industrial railways.  I toyed with Irish 3' gauge in 4mm on 12mm track, which had some commercial support at the time, but didn't really fancy everything made from whitemetal. I had an aversion to whitemetal then which I still have now, especially using it for structural as opposed to detail parts.  My LHS at the time, Bob;s Models in Small Heath, which, because of the interests of some of the staff, sold some US models and kits and a few bits in Hon3.  This was what I'd been looking for, and still is; though to be honest I'm not really sure why even now.  I've never looked back, though there was a foray for a few years onto On30 with an exhibition layout over here in the UK., built and operated with some friends.  Over the years I've worked on and reworked upwards of 100 brass Hon3 locos, most now with DCC sound, most of which are in daily layout use on mine and other layouts, and built, scratch, kits and reworked brass somewhere around 400 items of rolling stock. I've been having fun, and still do.  

Mick
______________________________________________________________________
Mick Moignard
Specialising in DCC Sound
p: +44 7774 652504
e:
mick@...
skype: mickmoignard
The week may start M,T but it always ends up WTF!


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Dale Buxton
 

1). What got you into HOn3?  What appealed to you or what was the driving factor that moved you to HOn3

How I came to HOn3 sort of happened before I was born.
Two branches of my family settled in Silver Plume, CO in the 1870's. The C&S tracks ended up going right through my paternal great grandparents back yard in Silver Plume. One of my distant relatives was a carman on the Argentine Central. A great grandmother on the other side of the family worked at the lunch pavilion at the wye in Silver Plume. Finally, My mothers father was a trainman for the D&SL and later the D&RGW. So my awareness of trains and of the narrow gauge was with me as some of my earliest memories without really knowing what the 3ft. gauge was.

Some of my earliest memories of childhood toys are of trains. My mother's father loved to work on the RR's and I think he did his best to make sure I loved that life too.

When I was in my teens, Mal Ferrell's "Silver San Juan" was published, and I guess that was the final catalyst that set me on the path of HOn3 modeling. When I was very young my dad had an American Flyer S gauge that he let me play with. He said it was mine but we know the real truth about that. But, he discovered that HO scale took up less space for more trains in the same space that the S scale was taking up. So we switched to HO scale. So when I got the HOn3 bug, I was only changing gauges not scales.

2). What is the one thing you really love about HOn3?
HO is a scenery scale and I really like creating life-like scenery. Having 3ft. gauge trains running through big scenery is a way for me to recreate a bygone era that I never really saw but I wish I could have.

3). What is the one thing you watch out for in HOn3?
I would say that has got to be over-weighted rolling stock. Our little engines don't have much pulling power to begin with and too much weight in the cars will greatly detract from their performance.    

Dale Buxton  


On Sat, Jan 16, 2021 at 9:21 AM Craig Linn <drgw346@...> wrote:
Hi Everyone,

I'm getting ready to do a presentation for my railroad club on "The case for HOn3".  I was going to give my view points, but I thought that it might be cool to get a broader viewpoint from a larger group on what got them into HOn3, and then weave that into my presentation.

So my question for you all:

1). What got you into HOn3?  What appealed to you or what was the driving factor that moved you to HOn3
2). What is the one thing you really love about HOn3?
3). What is the one thing you watch out for in HOn3?

For me I've had a love of narrow gauge since a child, coming on family trips to Colorado and South Dakota's Black Hills as long as I can remember.  The small engines and big mountains really got me hooked.  When Blackstone showed up on scene that pretty much helped push me over the edge for HOn3.

What I really love about HOn3 is the tight nit communities.  I think you might say that about many of the scales, but I do feel like I get a wealth of information from many members of this community.  From Jim Vail to Craig Symington to Mike Conder to.....the list goes on and on....all help with any questions we might have and had been/have been always willing to help each other out.

The one thing to watch out for...be aware of your tolerances.  Whether it be for the tolerances on tunnels or for track work or distances between tracks...make sure you be aware and keep an eye on those tolerances.

Hoping this will generate some discussions and will help out with my presentation.  If you have anything you want to contribute, I'd love to hear your experiences.

Thanks,
Craig Linn 


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Russ Norris
 

This whole discussion has been a trip down memory lane.  Like many of you I started as a boy with Lionel trains under the Christmas tree.  But ham radio led me in a different direction, and the trains were boxed up and given away when I went to MIT.  (Many years later a cousin found some of them in his attic and returned them, but that is another story.)  After college and seminary and graduate studies in France, I ended up back in the States looking for a call to a church, and ended up as a Lutheran pastor in a small town in south central Pennsylvania called Mount Union, which happened to be the northern terminus of the East Broad Top narrow gauge railroad.  It also happened to be the town where my future wife grew up.  I discovered the EBT at a winter spectacular in the mid-1970s and immediately fell in love with both the railroad and my future wife.  I am still with both of them.

Just down the block from the parsonage, my good friend and colleague, the Presbyterian minister,was a fellow train buff, but he liked collecting Lionel trains which he ran on the floor of a spare bedroom in the manse.  I was bitten for a second time by the model train bug and promptly ran out and bought an HO Blue Comet pacific locomotive, followed by a heavy 0-8-0 switcher.  I didn't have a model railroad, I just liked the looks of them. I began tinkering with "improvements" to my little collection of HO locomotives, including adding a brass Elesco feedwater heater to the 0-8-0 along with a pilot truck to convert it into a massive consolidation.  Eventually I invested in a couple of 4x8 sheets of plywood and built a small layout on sawbucks in the parsonage basement. 

That primitive layout was the first incarnation of what I eventually named the Blacklog Valley Railroad, after a nearby mountain.  Eventually there were 4 more layouts as we moved from one ministry to another,, where I experimented with things like spline benchwork and staging yards.  In 2006, when I retired and we moved to Cape Cod, I started work on a new layout  I liked HO scale, as it allowed me to fit in a lot of railroad in a limited space.  But shortly before retirement, I acquired a brass HOn3 model of EBT #18, the last and largest of the road's 2-8-2s.  The idea occurred to me to build my latest (and possibly last) model railroad in HO and HOn3.  The HO section would continue a 40 year series of layouts based on my fictional Blacklog Valley, and the HOn3 would allow me to build a compressed version of the East Broad Top.  The new layout would include a dual gauge yard like the one in Mount Union, along with other iconic scenes from the narrow gauge of the East.  I loved HOn3 because it was (as a previous writer has said) CUTE!  And it allowed me to continue my historical interest in this little coal hauler in the mountains of Pennsylvania.

Over the last 15 years the railroad has grown to fill a bump out room in the attic that measures 20 x 20 feet.  I have now reproduced a small version of Mount Union, a complete model of the shops at Orbisonia/Rockhill, and the town of Robertsdale at the southern end of the EBT where the coal mines were located.  Now approaching 79 years of age, however, I find that HOn3 -- which I dearly love -- is becoming more difficult because of declining eyesight and fine scale motor skills, especially when it comes to installing Soundtraxx decoders in those tiny Hallmark brass engines.  I have thought about changing to a larger scale -- maybe On30 -- but I have so much time and effort invested in all those structures, engines and cars, that I just don't have the energy to start over again.  One of the advantages of HOn3 is that tiny defects in my modeling skills are hard for me to see, so everything looks perfect from my point of view.  😁

Russ Norris MMR


On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 7:54 PM Robert Bennett <ngbobme@...> wrote:
Good Evening All,

For me, this is an interesting question. While most of my recent modeling activities have been focused on the Maine Two Footers in On30, my first thirty or so years of "serious" model railroading was in HOn3. After starting with a Christmas gift Herkimer set (does anyone remember those?), I experimented in modeling for fifteen years or so, through college, with mostly HO. I scratched some E.L.Moore-based structures and had the typical ping pong table layout in the basement. I joined the Maine National Guard in 1971 and after BCT and OJT at Ft. Dix, I got home by the Spring of '72. A new hobby shop had just opened in Bar Mills, ME, and I went down one weekend. I was poking around when, BAM!, I saw this cute little red caboose sitting in an open box on a shelf. It was a built-up LaBelle D&RGW kit done by a fellow modeler in Brunswick, ME. I snapped it up and was hooked on narrow gauge. I have been in the hobby for sixty years more or less now and narrow gauge modeling is still mostly my thing. My 100 or so magazine articles over the years have focused on a lot of subjects, but the those based on two and three foot gauge models have been the most fun to research and write, and the resulting models have seen the most use on a couple of layouts. As I wrote in the latest HOn3 Annual, I am starting to build an operating Colorado-based module, using leftover HOn3 locos and rolling stock and structures from my previous full layout. Narrow gauge lines were, and are, special with interesting histories, unique histories and fascinating stories and scenery. I have a pretty extensive library and as several have mentioned, Beebe and Clegg's books were and are a great incentive too. I still have that first "buggy" and as my real first incentive to replicate the slim gauges, it will always have a home with me.

Stay well everyone and keep modeling.

Best,  Bob Bennett


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Mike Conder
 

So I gotta add my story.

Grew up modeling airplanes in styrene, kitbashing most of the kits I bought.  My dad was doing HO coal from Ky area but I was never really interested in that.

Got interested in the history of mining, milling and smelting technology when working my first real job as an engineer at an Arizona copper mine.  The engineering library had a bunch of technical books dating back to the early 1900's.  About that time I ran across a Gazette at a hobby shop in Tucson (looking for an airplane model to build) that had Tom Yorke's article on staining plaster.  First hook, another Gazette a year later was a second hook!  Final two hooks were the "Frienda Mine" ( or something like that) on the cover of RMC and the discovery of old company pics dating back to the early 1900's of mines & railroads.  Sold!  But also because the only people in the world also interested in old mines, mills and smelters are narrow gauge guys.

First model was an MDC outside frame 2-8-0 kit that I bought with funds from selling an inherited Pennsy K-4 kit (that I sold for a DEEP discount because I didn't know its value.  Firat car was a scratch passenger car with curved (no bullnose) roof.  Eventually got NMRA Merit Awards on both.  And the fun continues!

And I'm still in HOn3 because the Arizona mining area I model had 8 outside frame locos (about the size of C-21's and two were same design as the C-25) and there was NO WAY I could afford to cut up brass locos in any other scale to build these!

Mike Conder

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 5:54 PM Robert Bennett <ngbobme@...> wrote:
Good Evening All,

For me, this is an interesting question. While most of my recent modeling activities have been focused on the Maine Two Footers in On30, my first thirty or so years of "serious" model railroading was in HOn3. After starting with a Christmas gift Herkimer set (does anyone remember those?), I experimented in modeling for fifteen years or so, through college, with mostly HO. I scratched some E.L.Moore-based structures and had the typical ping pong table layout in the basement. I joined the Maine National Guard in 1971 and after BCT and OJT at Ft. Dix, I got home by the Spring of '72. A new hobby shop had just opened in Bar Mills, ME, and I went down one weekend. I was poking around when, BAM!, I saw this cute little red caboose sitting in an open box on a shelf. It was a built-up LaBelle D&RGW kit done by a fellow modeler in Brunswick, ME. I snapped it up and was hooked on narrow gauge. I have been in the hobby for sixty years more or less now and narrow gauge modeling is still mostly my thing. My 100 or so magazine articles over the years have focused on a lot of subjects, but the those based on two and three foot gauge models have been the most fun to research and write, and the resulting models have seen the most use on a couple of layouts. As I wrote in the latest HOn3 Annual, I am starting to build an operating Colorado-based module, using leftover HOn3 locos and rolling stock and structures from my previous full layout. Narrow gauge lines were, and are, special with interesting histories, unique histories and fascinating stories and scenery. I have a pretty extensive library and as several have mentioned, Beebe and Clegg's books were and are a great incentive too. I still have that first "buggy" and as my real first incentive to replicate the slim gauges, it will always have a home with me.

Stay well everyone and keep modeling.

Best,  Bob Bennett


Re: What got you in to HOn3?

Robert Bennett
 

Good Evening All,

For me, this is an interesting question. While most of my recent modeling activities have been focused on the Maine Two Footers in On30, my first thirty or so years of "serious" model railroading was in HOn3. After starting with a Christmas gift Herkimer set (does anyone remember those?), I experimented in modeling for fifteen years or so, through college, with mostly HO. I scratched some E.L.Moore-based structures and had the typical ping pong table layout in the basement. I joined the Maine National Guard in 1971 and after BCT and OJT at Ft. Dix, I got home by the Spring of '72. A new hobby shop had just opened in Bar Mills, ME, and I went down one weekend. I was poking around when, BAM!, I saw this cute little red caboose sitting in an open box on a shelf. It was a built-up LaBelle D&RGW kit done by a fellow modeler in Brunswick, ME. I snapped it up and was hooked on narrow gauge. I have been in the hobby for sixty years more or less now and narrow gauge modeling is still mostly my thing. My 100 or so magazine articles over the years have focused on a lot of subjects, but the those based on two and three foot gauge models have been the most fun to research and write, and the resulting models have seen the most use on a couple of layouts. As I wrote in the latest HOn3 Annual, I am starting to build an operating Colorado-based module, using leftover HOn3 locos and rolling stock and structures from my previous full layout. Narrow gauge lines were, and are, special with interesting histories, unique histories and fascinating stories and scenery. I have a pretty extensive library and as several have mentioned, Beebe and Clegg's books were and are a great incentive too. I still have that first "buggy" and as my real first incentive to replicate the slim gauges, it will always have a home with me.

Stay well everyone and keep modeling.

Best,  Bob Bennett


Re: White Pass & Yukon decals

Robert Bell
 

Dave,
CDS was a Canadian based company.  CDS closed up shop and retired maybe 15 -20 years ago I think.  It was my understanding that Ozark Miniatures had bought the artwork and rights, but I could be wrong.  I always wished that the artwork for the dry transfers could have been turned into decals.

Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC




On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 09:56:59 AM EST, Climax@... <climax@...> wrote:


In reference to dry transfers, I had heard someplace that the chemicals that are used in them are now on the endangered list, hazardous, or what ever, which has basically stopped production by those who made them.  If they were made in California I can say that for sure as they ban everything from Ketchup to Mustard if someone doesn't like it.
It would stand to reason that items like that could be made where humanity and politicians are not stacked up on top of each other and get yet get the job done with very little harm done to the environment.  I guess I am just an old fuddy-duddy and have more or less ignored those repressive limitations over the last 73 years and am still on my own two feet.
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: "Robert Veefkind via groups.io"
Sent: Jan 17, 2021 9:29 AM
To: hon3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] White Pass & Yukon decals

Thanks Rob   the cds decals dried up and (to me ) are useless. I emailed Republic and no answer yet. Have you ever seen the PFM model of # 70 ?  Thanks esp.John and others for the help   Bob V.
 
In a message dated 1/17/2021 4:41:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, ionhoss@... writes:
 
Ozark Miniatures had the CDS line listed up until about a year or so ago, and the link is still there on their website.  I had ordered several sets from them just a couple of years ago, although they did not keep the line of dry transfers running.  I had assumed that they bought the line of dry transfers.  I attempted to make contact via email about a year ago and never got a response.
 
Republic Locomotive Works has WP&YR decals - only in white - and they ship fast.
 
Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC
 
 
 
On Saturday, January 16, 2021, 04:10:41 PM EST, John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
 
 
Bob
 
CDS Dry Transfers and Robert Sloan Decals were the primary sources of WP&Y lettering.  Both are now long gone, but they occasionally turn up on EBay.
 
Republic Locomotive Works is the only source I know of that currently offers White Pass decals < ">https://www.republiclocomotiveworks.com>.  Republic is basically an N scale narrow gauge supplier, but their decals are available in N, HO, S & O.  This is possibly the widest range of narrow gauge lines currently available, although otherwise often fairly generic.  I believe that these are the Bob Sloan artwork.  See pages 10 & 11 of their listing for White Pass freight, slogans and heralds.
 
A quick scan also finds WestSide, EBT, D&RG, DSP&P, CCR, UPD&G, SR&RL, ET&WNC, OR&W/PRR, generic passenger, Pacific Coast, D&RGW, Mears roads, NCNG, NC&O, Uintah, logging roads, Sumpter Valley, SPNG, Nevada & California, Carson & Colorado, WP&Y, SPC, NPC, North Shore, Gramps tank, Conoco tanck, RGS Goose, D&RGW San Juan train.  Note that their web listing is a bit flaky: you cannot simply go back, but must use their previous, next, or page number links.
 
Labelle also offers freight car decals covering their surprisingly wide range of narrow gauge kits.
 
San Juan Models is mostly Colorado prototype, but also offers a few out of state lines.
 
Not a direct source, but Bill Mosteller of Great Model Railroad Decals < " data-mce-href="https://www.greatdecals.com/>">https://www.greatdecals.com/> has tried to compile a list of all suppliers <https://www.greatdecals.com/Decals.html>.
 
John Stutz
On January 16, 2021 9:02 AM Robert Veefkind via groups.io <snookdust@...> wrote:
 
 

Are they available for hon3 ? Microscale and Thinfilm do not list them.   Bob veefkind


Re: Rio Grande Models trucks

Scott Baker
 

Hello All,
First time post(er) here! I have had success with RGM trucks using CA. I usually clean the castings well with soapy water first. Also, (and this works for Precision Scale Co. trucks as well), I put the wheel sets in and while the CA (or solder) sets, I hold the truck right side up with wheelsets on flat surface or test track. This seems to help them sit on the rails equalized better after drying for smooth operation. Of course ,you can bend them and tweak them later, but I have found this can be problematic at times. Also, keep an eye on the sideframes as the glue/solder cures and make sure they are plumb, it is easy to attach them at an angle.
Hope this helps,
Scott Baker


Re: White Pass & Yukon decals

Robert Bell
 

What is your question about the RLW decals?  I have some in front of me...sort of.

Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC




On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 03:47:40 PM EST, Robert Bell via groups.io <ionhoss@...> wrote:


Bob,
Have I seen one of the PFM 70 class locos?  Haha...I own 4 of them.  Still need a SN 34, painted "USA" of course...hint hint.  Emoji

Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC




On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 09:29:25 AM EST, Robert Veefkind via groups.io <snookdust@...> wrote:


Thanks Rob   the cds decals dried up and (to me ) are useless. I emailed Republic and no answer yet. Have you ever seen the PFM model of # 70 ?  Thanks esp.John and others for the help   Bob V.
 
In a message dated 1/17/2021 4:41:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, ionhoss@... writes:
 
Ozark Miniatures had the CDS line listed up until about a year or so ago, and the link is still there on their website.  I had ordered several sets from them just a couple of years ago, although they did not keep the line of dry transfers running.  I had assumed that they bought the line of dry transfers.  I attempted to make contact via email about a year ago and never got a response.
 
Republic Locomotive Works has WP&YR decals - only in white - and they ship fast.
 
Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC
 
 
 
On Saturday, January 16, 2021, 04:10:41 PM EST, John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
 
 
Bob
 
CDS Dry Transfers and Robert Sloan Decals were the primary sources of WP&Y lettering.  Both are now long gone, but they occasionally turn up on EBay.
 
Republic Locomotive Works is the only source I know of that currently offers White Pass decals < ">https://www.republiclocomotiveworks.com>.  Republic is basically an N scale narrow gauge supplier, but their decals are available in N, HO, S & O.  This is possibly the widest range of narrow gauge lines currently available, although otherwise often fairly generic.  I believe that these are the Bob Sloan artwork.  See pages 10 & 11 of their listing for White Pass freight, slogans and heralds.
 
A quick scan also finds WestSide, EBT, D&RG, DSP&P, CCR, UPD&G, SR&RL, ET&WNC, OR&W/PRR, generic passenger, Pacific Coast, D&RGW, Mears roads, NCNG, NC&O, Uintah, logging roads, Sumpter Valley, SPNG, Nevada & California, Carson & Colorado, WP&Y, SPC, NPC, North Shore, Gramps tank, Conoco tanck, RGS Goose, D&RGW San Juan train.  Note that their web listing is a bit flaky: you cannot simply go back, but must use their previous, next, or page number links.
 
Labelle also offers freight car decals covering their surprisingly wide range of narrow gauge kits.
 
San Juan Models is mostly Colorado prototype, but also offers a few out of state lines.
 
Not a direct source, but Bill Mosteller of Great Model Railroad Decals < " data-mce-href="https://www.greatdecals.com/>">https://www.greatdecals.com/> has tried to compile a list of all suppliers <https://www.greatdecals.com/Decals.html>.
 
John Stutz
On January 16, 2021 9:02 AM Robert Veefkind via groups.io <snookdust@...> wrote:
 
 

Are they available for hon3 ? Microscale and Thinfilm do not list them.   Bob veefkind


Re: White Pass & Yukon decals

Robert Bell
 

Bob,
Have I seen one of the PFM 70 class locos?  Haha...I own 4 of them.  Still need a SN 34, painted "USA" of course...hint hint.  Emoji

Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC




On Sunday, January 17, 2021, 09:29:25 AM EST, Robert Veefkind via groups.io <snookdust@...> wrote:


Thanks Rob   the cds decals dried up and (to me ) are useless. I emailed Republic and no answer yet. Have you ever seen the PFM model of # 70 ?  Thanks esp.John and others for the help   Bob V.
 
In a message dated 1/17/2021 4:41:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, ionhoss@... writes:
 
Ozark Miniatures had the CDS line listed up until about a year or so ago, and the link is still there on their website.  I had ordered several sets from them just a couple of years ago, although they did not keep the line of dry transfers running.  I had assumed that they bought the line of dry transfers.  I attempted to make contact via email about a year ago and never got a response.
 
Republic Locomotive Works has WP&YR decals - only in white - and they ship fast.
 
Rob Bell
Modeling the White Pass & Yukon Route in HOn3
Waynesville, NC
 
 
 
On Saturday, January 16, 2021, 04:10:41 PM EST, John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
 
 
Bob
 
CDS Dry Transfers and Robert Sloan Decals were the primary sources of WP&Y lettering.  Both are now long gone, but they occasionally turn up on EBay.
 
Republic Locomotive Works is the only source I know of that currently offers White Pass decals < ">https://www.republiclocomotiveworks.com>.  Republic is basically an N scale narrow gauge supplier, but their decals are available in N, HO, S & O.  This is possibly the widest range of narrow gauge lines currently available, although otherwise often fairly generic.  I believe that these are the Bob Sloan artwork.  See pages 10 & 11 of their listing for White Pass freight, slogans and heralds.
 
A quick scan also finds WestSide, EBT, D&RG, DSP&P, CCR, UPD&G, SR&RL, ET&WNC, OR&W/PRR, generic passenger, Pacific Coast, D&RGW, Mears roads, NCNG, NC&O, Uintah, logging roads, Sumpter Valley, SPNG, Nevada & California, Carson & Colorado, WP&Y, SPC, NPC, North Shore, Gramps tank, Conoco tanck, RGS Goose, D&RGW San Juan train.  Note that their web listing is a bit flaky: you cannot simply go back, but must use their previous, next, or page number links.
 
Labelle also offers freight car decals covering their surprisingly wide range of narrow gauge kits.
 
San Juan Models is mostly Colorado prototype, but also offers a few out of state lines.
 
Not a direct source, but Bill Mosteller of Great Model Railroad Decals < " data-mce-href="https://www.greatdecals.com/>">https://www.greatdecals.com/> has tried to compile a list of all suppliers <https://www.greatdecals.com/Decals.html>.
 
John Stutz
On January 16, 2021 9:02 AM Robert Veefkind via groups.io <snookdust@...> wrote:
 
 

Are they available for hon3 ? Microscale and Thinfilm do not list them.   Bob veefkind

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