Date   

Re: Train camera

Brian Kopp
 

Steve,
I am just starting to ask the same question about these little cameras. It seems we are jumping in the middle of the river. We need to get smart about FPV cameras first (First Person View). They are put on these multi-blade copters and give the pilot a view. That hobby has married these cameras to virtual reality headsets for the superman perspective while flying. The videos are pretty amazing.

So far I have figured out I need an FPV camera and a separate FPV DVR for recording.  The DVR is a small square PCB and uses an SD card. Last week RunCam CS told me they don't sell a phone app controller interface but there are some youtube videos that suggest you can do that. I am still trying to understand the power interface and configuration part of these set ups. RunCams product documentation is severely lacking (they assume you are FPV savvy) but their latest cameras get good reviews. The generic FPV schematic I saw last night showed an FPV camera wired to an FPV DVR which was wired to a "flight controller module". I am wondering if we can replace the flight controller module with a DCC motor or light controller and battery but I need to get smarter first before I jump in. The good news is these cameras seem very reasonable......

Anybody got a good FPV beginner tutorial link??

--
Brian Kopp
Jacksonville, FL


Re: Train camera

Mike Conder
 

No clue.  Ask them.

Note that I am NOT making a recommendation as I don't have one and there's a dearth of info about them on their website.  Caveat emptor!

Mike Conder


On Sat, Dec 12, 2020 at 2:23 PM Steven Haworth <haworth7@...> wrote:
So - how do you connect and use the Racer Nano?  It looks cool, great size, and I see it can handle 5-36v, which I'd guess you could feed from DCC in the rails?  But what about the video signal - where's it go for recording?

- Steve Haworth
RGS history - http://www.rgsrr.com/
Blog - http://rgsrr.blogspot.com/               FB - https://www.facebook.com/stevesrgs/


On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 5:01 PM Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:

On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 1:14 PM ftgcss <ftgc@...> wrote:
Mike,

Where did you find the dimension data for the Run Cam 2?  I didn't see it on the web site.

Thanks,
Scott


Re: Train camera

Steven Haworth
 

So - how do you connect and use the Racer Nano?  It looks cool, great size, and I see it can handle 5-36v, which I'd guess you could feed from DCC in the rails?  But what about the video signal - where's it go for recording?

- Steve Haworth
RGS history - http://www.rgsrr.com/
Blog - http://rgsrr.blogspot.com/               FB - https://www.facebook.com/stevesrgs/


On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 5:01 PM Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:

On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 1:14 PM ftgcss <ftgc@...> wrote:
Mike,

Where did you find the dimension data for the Run Cam 2?  I didn't see it on the web site.

Thanks,
Scott


Re: 2020 Annual

Bodo Rasler
 

Mine will hopefully arrive soon.

 

Bodo Rasler

 

From: HOn3@groups.io [mailto:HOn3@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill Miller via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2020 17:32
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] 2020 Annual

 

I got my copy of the HOn3 annual today Saturday Dec 12,  It sat for a week at Pitney Bowes in Odenton MD having been mailed Dec 2nd. Not the fault of anyone at White River Productions.  Hello Rick Rhode. Have not heard or seen anyone from the hobby shop in years.

 

 Bill Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: Rick Rhode via groups.io <rvrhode@...>
To: hon3@groups.io <hon3@groups.io>; HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Dec 9, 2020 11:03 am
Subject: Re: [HOn3] 2020 Annual

Haven't seen mine yet here in Bunn, NC, although I got a notice that it is on its way.  Also, a shout out to Bill Miller and any other alum of Doug's Hobby Shop!

                                     Rick Rhode

 

On Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 10:44:49 AM EST, Ted Wilton <twilton@...> wrote:

 

 

Mine arrived in the Reno, Nevada area on December 8, and it was very well packaged! Nice job on the content Chris! Some excellent photography of outstanding modeling of mine buildings!

Ted Wilton
Spanish Springs, Nevada


Re: 2020 Annual

Bill Miller
 

I got my copy of the HOn3 annual today Saturday Dec 12,  It sat for a week at Pitney Bowes in Odenton MD having been mailed Dec 2nd. Not the fault of anyone at White River Productions.  Hello Rick Rhode. Have not heard or seen anyone from the hobby shop in years.

 Bill Miller


-----Original Message-----
From: Rick Rhode via groups.io <rvrhode@...>
To: hon3@groups.io <hon3@groups.io>; HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Dec 9, 2020 11:03 am
Subject: Re: [HOn3] 2020 Annual

Haven't seen mine yet here in Bunn, NC, although I got a notice that it is on its way.  Also, a shout out to Bill Miller and any other alum of Doug's Hobby Shop!
                                     Rick Rhode

On Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 10:44:49 AM EST, Ted Wilton <twilton@...> wrote:


Mine arrived in the Reno, Nevada area on December 8, and it was very well packaged! Nice job on the content Chris! Some excellent photography of outstanding modeling of mine buildings!

Ted Wilton
Spanish Springs, Nevada


Re: Backdrop construction

tonyk537
 

That Nn3 layout was incredible Paul !


Re: Train camera

Mike Conder
 

On Fri, Dec 11, 2020 at 1:14 PM ftgcss <ftgc@...> wrote:
Mike,

Where did you find the dimension data for the Run Cam 2?  I didn't see it on the web site.

Thanks,
Scott


Re: Train camera

ftgcss
 

Mike,

Where did you find the dimension data for the Run Cam 2?  I didn't see it on the web site.

Thanks,
Scott


Re: Backdrop construction

Bill Lugg
 

Jim,
I initially discounted this idea since there is just a 2" separation between the nearest track to be hidden and the yard track in front of it and the hidden track is nearly 14" above the yard track. Also, the view behind the yard needs to be the view of a reasonable sized town on the edge of a fairly large rail yard...

But, on further thought, you may be on to something... I could produce a bunch of building flats to populate my scene and fasten them to a plain sky backdrop that blocks the sight of the hidden tracks, saving what appears would be a fortune in the cost of a photorealistic backdrop.  I might even be able to 3D print these building flats as they wouldn't need to be finely detailed beyond a decent paint job at 2 feet from the viewer and behind a field of freight and passenger cars.  The wall is already painted sky blue so maybe adding some clouds to that to blend and I may be in business.

Thanks for the idea.  I'll have to pursue it further.

Bill

On 12/11/20 11:24 AM, Jim Marlett wrote:
So, if the issue is removing for access, it seems as though the access will be from the front. If so, why not put a conventional backdrop all the way to the back and put removable sections of mid ground features between the visible track and the permanent backdrop. For instance, if the middle ground is rolling hills, they could come up high enough to hide the trains behind them, but low enough to allow the rear background/sky and distant hills to be seen. This layer could be built as manageable pieces with the tops following the tops of the hills. You could bring the hillside ends below the horizon of the three dimensional scenery and overlap them with the next set of hills. I plan to do something similar with the mountain tops of my railroad. It wouldn’t have to be hills. It could be city buildings or mountains or even flat fields that rose up in the back. It would allow the “true” backdrop to be conventional while still providing access when you need it.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Dec 10, 2020, at 10:17 PM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net> wrote:

Lots of good ideas. It certainly wouldn't be portable. I'm a one man show so it would need to be fairly short sections I could lift out in the event of a problem behind the backdrop. It's all just straight track, but Murphy is alive and well, so I know something will happen at some point. I've got an inexpensive security camera system set up to watch trains pass behind the "curtain".

I've just got to figure out how to mesh them together so they stay in line with one another and so the whole thing doesn't come crashing down if I take one out.

Mike, can you tell me where you get the styrene from? I guess you'd just cut it with a sharp knife and loooong straight edge, right?

Paul, likewise how do you cut the material you use?

Thanks for all the info, I really appreciate it.

Bill Lugg





Re: Backdrop construction

rick@...
 

I dunno. I smell trouble. If you have a derail or other mishap back there, you need to remove a backdrop and then reach over whatever is in front, hoping you don't crush something. The yard is just storage then, as making up trains seems like a royal pain.

Can you drop that yard tracks down, move the front stuff on top of them, and get to the yard from underneath?

Rick


Backdrop photos

Ray
 

These are really great backdrops

Sent from Xfinity Connect Application

--
Ray in Colorado


Scratch built styrene building material

Dusty
 

My Cricut is a cutting monster. Cuts parts faster than I can assemble them. Any opinions on whether to use .020 or .040 for walls. The .040 walls with windows and doors require SLIGHTLY more effort to open up. Not the deciding factor, for sure. The .020 requires more reinforcing. I have been using .125 x .125 for strength. I'm looking for pluses and minuses that I am probably missing. That whole seeing the forest for the trees thing. These are layout buildings not Smithsonian exhibits but I'm trying to do them reasonable justice.

Help. Thanks for any thoughts.

Dusty Burman
623 261-8707


Re: Backdrop construction

Jim Marlett
 

So, if the issue is removing for access, it seems as though the access will be from the front. If so, why not put a conventional backdrop all the way to the back and put removable sections of mid ground features between the visible track and the permanent backdrop. For instance, if the middle ground is rolling hills, they could come up high enough to hide the trains behind them, but low enough to allow the rear background/sky and distant hills to be seen. This layer could be built as manageable pieces with the tops following the tops of the hills. You could bring the hillside ends below the horizon of the three dimensional scenery and overlap them with the next set of hills. I plan to do something similar with the mountain tops of my railroad. It wouldn’t have to be hills. It could be city buildings or mountains or even flat fields that rose up in the back. It would allow the “true” backdrop to be conventional while still providing access when you need it.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/

On Dec 10, 2020, at 10:17 PM, Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net> wrote:

Lots of good ideas. It certainly wouldn't be portable. I'm a one man show so it would need to be fairly short sections I could lift out in the event of a problem behind the backdrop. It's all just straight track, but Murphy is alive and well, so I know something will happen at some point. I've got an inexpensive security camera system set up to watch trains pass behind the "curtain".

I've just got to figure out how to mesh them together so they stay in line with one another and so the whole thing doesn't come crashing down if I take one out.

Mike, can you tell me where you get the styrene from? I guess you'd just cut it with a sharp knife and loooong straight edge, right?

Paul, likewise how do you cut the material you use?

Thanks for all the info, I really appreciate it.

Bill Lugg


Re: Backdrop construction

Paul Sturtz
 

I used poster board to hide the staging yard on my 2' x 7' portable Nn3 layout.  The blue sky was removable for transport; the mountains were permanently attached.
Paul
Paul 


Re: Backdrop construction

John Hutnick
 

We have not mentioned a popular backdrop material: aluminum trim coil stock.  Comes in white rolls at Home Depot, about $93 for 50ft x 24".  It bends to any radius.  If you want to order from various suppliers, you can even get blue.


Re: Backdrop construction

Mike Conder
 

Bill, their name is Plasticare.   About a block west and a block south of Santa Fe & Orchard in Littleton (or is it Englewood there? Close enough)

Ok it's Englewood. 

4211 S Natches Ct, Englewood, CO 80110
(303) 781-1171

And they have amazing stuff. 

For about $50 I bought 4x8 sheets of 0.040" & 0.030" & 0.020" and had them cut into 12"x12" squares.  Haven't bought plain sheet styrene in years!

So if you know the widths, they can cut it for you lengthwise, makes it easy.  Otherwise yes, long straight edge and I'd use an acrylic scriber from HD or Lowe's in the section where they sell acrylic sheet for windows.  Just scribe and snap!

Thanks place has all kinds of plastics, I bought Delrin 13/4" rods to use as pins for aligning my modules.  And all kind of casting resins and supplies. 

Hope that helps. 

Mike Conder


On Thu, Dec 10, 2020 at 9:17 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
Lots of good ideas.  It certainly wouldn't be portable.  I'm a one man
show so it would need to be fairly short sections I could lift out in
the event of a problem behind the backdrop.  It's all just straight
track, but Murphy is alive and well, so I know something will happen at
some point.  I've got an inexpensive security camera system set up to
watch trains pass behind the "curtain".

I've just got to figure out how to mesh them together so they stay in
line with one another and so the whole thing doesn't come crashing down
if I take one out.

Mike, can you tell me where you get the styrene from?  I guess you'd
just cut it with a sharp knife and loooong straight edge, right?

Paul, likewise how do you cut the material you use?

Thanks for all the info, I really appreciate it.

Bill Lugg


On 12/10/20 5:27 PM, Mike Conder wrote:
> Removable or portable?  It depends a bit on how permanent it needs to
> be, as something that's moved weekly or for shows would be very
> different from something behind a layout that may only be moved when
> moving to a new house.  It also depends on how long it needs to be.
>
> Personally I'm at the latter stage and am seriously considering the
> 0.040" to 0.060" styrene.  We can get that in 4x8 sheets here in the
> Denver area.  I've also heard good things about some sort of flooring
> product like linoleum that can be one long sheet.  Also I've heard of
> aluminum and/or galvanized being available in long sheets/rolls but
> those may be harder to cut etc.  All these would need to be mounted on
> a frame I think.
>
> And just this week I heard of a thick artists' paper material that is
> some sort of sandwich (like foamcore but not sure it has the foam
> part) that takes paint extremely well (and probably glue for a
> backdrop photo) but I've forgotten the name.
>
> Mike Conder
>
> On Thu, Dec 10, 2020 at 4:23 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...
> <mailto:luggw1@...>> wrote:
>
>     I'm getting close to needing to construct a removable backdrop on my
>     layout.  It will be in sections and be about 24" to 30" tall, hiding
>     track that runs behind a yard.  I'm considering either 1/8"
>     Masonite (or
>     whatever they call it these days) or luan.  I figure the lighter the
>     better and I'd like to form part of it into a curve so flexibility
>     is a
>     consideration too.  I've never used luan so don't know what it's like.
>
>     What do you that have handled both recommend?
>
>     Thanks
>     Bill Lugg
>
>
>
>
>
>






Re: Backdrop construction

John Stutz
 

Bill

If your panels can be moved slightly sideways when being dismounted, then you can add interlockng fingers to the back side of each panel at the joints.   With panels set moderately deep groves, the pairs will hold each other in alignment.  Finger overlap need not be large: a few panel thicknesses should suffice.  Drawback is that they must then be taken down sequentially, from one end or the other.

John Stutz

On December 10, 2020 8:17 PM Bill Lugg < luggw1@...> wrote:  ....

I've just got to figure out how to mesh them together so they stay in
line with one another and so the whole thing doesn't come crashing down
if I take one out.  ....


Re: Backdrop construction

Climax@...
 

I guess I am here to stay, I painted my whole room with clouds, fog, mountains, trees, and dirt roads all in 3 days, all 4 walls. Second back drop I have painted and I did it right on the dry wall with acrylics which are easily painted over with regular latex. In my last layout I used dry wall to curve the corners too. Looked neat and eliminated the corners but not sure it was worth the effort. Sometimes we get caught up in the details and forget where the train is headed. Here is a few pix of my backdrop painting and I am NOT an artist.
DAve

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net>
Sent: Dec 10, 2020 11:17 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Backdrop construction

Lots of good ideas.  It certainly wouldn't be portable.  I'm a one man
show so it would need to be fairly short sections I could lift out in
the event of a problem behind the backdrop.  It's all just straight
track, but Murphy is alive and well, so I know something will happen at
some point.  I've got an inexpensive security camera system set up to
watch trains pass behind the "curtain".

I've just got to figure out how to mesh them together so they stay in
line with one another and so the whole thing doesn't come crashing down
if I take one out.

Mike, can you tell me where you get the styrene from?  I guess you'd
just cut it with a sharp knife and loooong straight edge, right?

Paul, likewise how do you cut the material you use?

Thanks for all the info, I really appreciate it.

Bill Lugg


On 12/10/20 5:27 PM, Mike Conder wrote:
Removable or portable?  It depends a bit on how permanent it needs to
be, as something that's moved weekly or for shows would be very
different from something behind a layout that may only be moved when
moving to a new house.  It also depends on how long it needs to be.

Personally I'm at the latter stage and am seriously considering the
0.040" to 0.060" styrene.  We can get that in 4x8 sheets here in the
Denver area.  I've also heard good things about some sort of flooring
product like linoleum that can be one long sheet.  Also I've heard of
aluminum and/or galvanized being available in long sheets/rolls but
those may be harder to cut etc.  All these would need to be mounted on
a frame I think.

And just this week I heard of a thick artists' paper material that is
some sort of sandwich (like foamcore but not sure it has the foam
part) that takes paint extremely well (and probably glue for a
backdrop photo) but I've forgotten the name.

Mike Conder

On Thu, Dec 10, 2020 at 4:23 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net
<mailto:luggw1@risebroadband.net>> wrote:

I'm getting close to needing to construct a removable backdrop on my
layout.  It will be in sections and be about 24" to 30" tall, hiding
track that runs behind a yard.  I'm considering either 1/8"
Masonite (or
whatever they call it these days) or luan.  I figure the lighter the
better and I'd like to form part of it into a curve so flexibility
is a
consideration too.  I've never used luan so don't know what it's like.

What do you that have handled both recommend?

Thanks
Bill Lugg









Re: Backdrop construction

Bill Lugg
 

Lots of good ideas.  It certainly wouldn't be portable.  I'm a one man show so it would need to be fairly short sections I could lift out in the event of a problem behind the backdrop.  It's all just straight track, but Murphy is alive and well, so I know something will happen at some point.  I've got an inexpensive security camera system set up to watch trains pass behind the "curtain".

I've just got to figure out how to mesh them together so they stay in line with one another and so the whole thing doesn't come crashing down if I take one out.

Mike, can you tell me where you get the styrene from?  I guess you'd just cut it with a sharp knife and loooong straight edge, right?

Paul, likewise how do you cut the material you use?

Thanks for all the info, I really appreciate it.

Bill Lugg

On 12/10/20 5:27 PM, Mike Conder wrote:
Removable or portable?  It depends a bit on how permanent it needs to be, as something that's moved weekly or for shows would be very different from something behind a layout that may only be moved when moving to a new house.  It also depends on how long it needs to be.

Personally I'm at the latter stage and am seriously considering the 0.040" to 0.060" styrene.  We can get that in 4x8 sheets here in the Denver area.  I've also heard good things about some sort of flooring product like linoleum that can be one long sheet.  Also I've heard of aluminum and/or galvanized being available in long sheets/rolls but those may be harder to cut etc.  All these would need to be mounted on a frame I think.

And just this week I heard of a thick artists' paper material that is some sort of sandwich (like foamcore but not sure it has the foam part) that takes paint extremely well (and probably glue for a backdrop photo) but I've forgotten the name.

Mike Conder

On Thu, Dec 10, 2020 at 4:23 PM Bill Lugg <luggw1@risebroadband.net <mailto:luggw1@risebroadband.net>> wrote:

I'm getting close to needing to construct a removable backdrop on my
layout.  It will be in sections and be about 24" to 30" tall, hiding
track that runs behind a yard.  I'm considering either 1/8"
Masonite (or
whatever they call it these days) or luan.  I figure the lighter the
better and I'd like to form part of it into a curve so flexibility
is a
consideration too.  I've never used luan so don't know what it's like.

What do you that have handled both recommend?

Thanks
Bill Lugg






Re: Backdrop construction

Jim Marlett
 

I believe you are referring to FRP – fiberglass reinforced panels.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Dec 10, 2020, at 6:26 PM, Paul Sturtz <apa_208@...> wrote:

I used a fiberglass? material from Lowes, sold in 4x8 sheets.  One side is pebbled and shiny (I think for bathroom use) the other side is plain and dull.  Easy to use, cost the same as Masonite but not affected by humidity or temperature.  I used it for the facia as well.  The photo shows early construction at a 90 degree corner and somewhat later after some scenery installed.
_._,_._,_


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