Date   

Re: Is there market "demand" for 3D printed HOn3 trucks?

Mick Moignard
 

Many years ago I made a set of the cast RPO trucks from MDC trucks and an E&B/MRGS outside bearing beam. Pretty convincing, well I think so...

Mick
______________________________________________________________________
Mick Moignard
Specialising in DCC Sound
p: +44 7774 652504
e:
mick@...
skype: mickmoignard
The week may start M,T but it always ends up WTF!


Re: Looking for Kemtron C-16 (Original) Kit for sale or trade

Ric Case
 

Roger contact me off list! Just went through a box of equipment purchased from an estate! Thought I saw it on the list. Nob no instructions but looks like everything is there! I will need to lay out everything on a sheet to verify what’s there! It does have the Nwsl gear box and can motor. I was going to re gear one of my Westside C-16 , thus the purchase originally!


Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Sep 29, 2020, at 10:07 PM, Roger Clay <roger@...> wrote:

Hi! Burning Rio, a newbie here, looking for a Kemton C-16 Original kit. Over 40 years ago, I was building this kit, when I was offered a job at Precision Scale Company as a brass caster. I gave all my stuff to my brother to watch over until I got setup and settled. In the period of time that moving and settling took, he somehow accidentally tossed a box with a bunch of my NG projects.  The partially completed C-16 one of those projects in that box, MUCH to my horror!

I eventually forgave him (it was just as much my fault for not marking the box), and now that I have A LOT more time on my hands (thank you COVID-19), I want to "finish" what I started back in the day.

If you have or know of anyone with that kit, PLEASE drop me an email.

TIA -- Roger (AKA burning rio)


Re: Is there market "demand" for 3D printed HOn3 trucks?

Wayne
 

FWIW:  LaBelle sells a lot of D&RGW passenger cars, all of which come without trucks.  I personally have 6 unstarted kits and 3 completed ones on which I have installed KaDee 717 trucks ( 4' 6" arch bar).  Blackstone made passenger trucks but everyone has  been out of them for over a year+ now.  Modelrailroadgeneralstore.com sells their own brand on eBay from time to time but their service is terrible - 10 days after payment clears before they ship. 


Re: Is there market "demand" for 3D printed HOn3 trucks?

Jim Spencer
 

For years the brass builders in HOn3 were putting out RPO cars with incorrect outside clasp passenger trucks. Offhand, I can think of Key, PFM, Balboa or Custom Brass and maybe others were doing this.  Those particular cars built new in the mid 1920s had trucks with cast steel frames and inside clasp brakes (maybe built by AC&F(?).  PSC did a late run of the brass RPO cars with the correct trucks and I understand that a few were available separately, but very pricey! Others, including me bought the WP&Y steel cabooses for the trucks - that are similar but too short. And I would like to repatriate my trucks with the original caboose where they below.

Given that there are a lot of brass and non-brass RPO cars out there, it would seem to me to be a good candidate for 3D printed trucks.  And I believe that all of those trucks are still in use on the Durango & Silverton because of their newer design, therefore available for measurements. Comments?

Jim Spencer


Re: Division Point K-27 question

k27bry
 

^ Thanks Lawrence - I thought I remembered 455 , but what you said makes sense . I exchanged an e-mail with Jack a couple days ago and for some reason those previously mentioned new run K-27's and K-28's are no longer being planned .
                                                                 Regards,
                                                                               Bryan


Re: BLACKSTONE C-19s FOR SALE

Brian Booth
 

I would take a black boiler unlettered version.  Emailed and Private Messaged.

Thanks 

Brian


Re: Division Point K-27 question

Lawrence Wisniewski <lwreno@...>
 

As far as I can recall, Division Point only brought in 4 inside piston valve K-27's (454, 456, 458, 461).  No outside valve engines were done although there was a promise to do those on the "next run" (which never came in).  I am not sure if the 461 was done in both D&RGW and RGS versions.


-----Original Message-----
From: k27bry via groups.io <k27bry@...>
To: HOn3@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Sep 30, 2020 12:41 pm
Subject: [HOn3] Division Point K-27 question

Hi Guys ,
               I was heavily invested in PBL Sn3 when the DP HOn3 K-27's came out and didn't pay much attention to which versions they did at the time so I'm only aware of ones I saw for sale in the aftermarket . I'm aware of early / speed lettering on some as well as RGS on 455 and 461 so beyond these numbers  ( 454 , 455 , 456 , 461 ) which others did Jack do ?
                                                                 Thanks,
                                                                              Bryan


Division Point K-27 question

k27bry
 
Edited

Hi Guys ,
               I was heavily invested in PBL Sn3 when the DP HOn3 K-27's came out and didn't pay much attention to which versions they did at the time so I'm only aware of ones I saw for sale in the aftermarket . I'm aware of early / speed lettering on some as well as RGS on 455 and 461 so beyond these numbers  ( 454 , 455 , 456 , 458, 461 ) which others did Jack do ?
                                                                 Thanks,
                                                                              Bryan


Re: brake gear

Don Ball
 

They are still available. Go to sanjuanmodelco.com

Don Ball

On Wed, Sep 30, 2020 at 10:21 AM Robert Veefkind via groups.io <snookdust=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good day gentlemen
Looks like Grandt line brake parts for hon3 freight cars and tanks are no later available-or are they ? The tichy parts are okay but wish they were cast in black instead of grey. They need to painted black before installing on existing cars. Any thing else out there ?   Bob Veefkind


brake gear

Robert Veefkind
 

Good day gentlemen
Looks like Grandt line brake parts for hon3 freight cars and tanks are no later available-or are they ? The tichy parts are okay but wish they were cast in black instead of grey. They need to painted black before installing on existing cars. Any thing else out there ?   Bob Veefkind


Looking for Kemtron C-16 (Original) Kit for sale or trade

Roger Clay
 

Hi! Burning Rio, a newbie here, looking for a Kemton C-16 Original kit. Over 40 years ago, I was building this kit, when I was offered a job at Precision Scale Company as a brass caster. I gave all my stuff to my brother to watch over until I got setup and settled. In the period of time that moving and settling took, he somehow accidentally tossed a box with a bunch of my NG projects.  The partially completed C-16 one of those projects in that box, MUCH to my horror!

I eventually forgave him (it was just as much my fault for not marking the box), and now that I have A LOT more time on my hands (thank you COVID-19), I want to "finish" what I started back in the day.

If you have or know of anyone with that kit, PLEASE drop me an email.

TIA -- Roger (AKA burning rio)


Blackstone C19 bumblebee #345 for sale

hiroechan
 

I already have one of these weathered w new 705 couplers, so this one is surplus to my needs.

Almost-new, test-run-only Blackstone C19 #345 in "Bumblebee"/ movie scheme paint, DCC w/ factory sound. Tender has realistic coal applied over the factory coal casting. Unweathered. Minor blemish on tender engineer side. (Photos available on request.)

Packed in original Blackstone box, includes spare dc-only board to replace the DCC decoder, for folks who run DC only.

$550 plus shipping (OBO), paypal preferred.



On Tue, Sep 29, 2020, 12:44 AM John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:

I have been making and using similar tools for about 30 years now, but using a lathe and mill to do so.

Ric's photo shows a way forward for those of us who do not have lathes. 

Apologies for the length,  This was ment to be short, but is fast approaching book length.  I hope some find it useful.

A brass tool will cut plastic, both Delren and most polymers used in 3-D modeling, with occasional resharpening.  Steel will last longer, but is a little harder to work with.  Use 1/8" stock if you are turning with a Dremel, either Ric's 3/16" or 1/4" stock if turning with a drill.  Cut your piece a little longer than the width over axleboxes, chuck it with a washer to protect the chuck, run at moderate speed, and file your point.

The point angle needs to be a little blunter than the axle points.  For rounded tip axles (Kadee) the tool point needs to be a little blunter than the taper behind the axle point. The idea here is to ensure that the truck rides on the axle's point,without any contact elsewhere.  When filing a point this way, there is a tendency to make it sharper than wanted, because the tip, at zero radius, while rotating is not actually moving. So start with an overly blunt point, stroke the file, and work your way back to the desired angle.  A coarse file can be used initially, but finish up with your finest single-cut file, always using a file handle. It will help if whatever you use to rotate the work is solidly mounted, so you can control the file with both hands.  A heavy drill press is ideal, but I have used a Dremel in their drill press, laid on its side

For all materials the cutting edge should be square to the tool's cone's surface.  This can be either a groove, as Ric used, or a half diameter flat.  The groove is safer for just cleaning out a well molded axlebox, as it provides a larger guide surface.    A groove for cutting right handed, when viewed from the side, point up, should pass just to the right of the point. The half flat version is actually a fair drill, and can also be used to deepen axlebox bearing cavities, but will serve for cleanup if used with light pressure. this will cut in either direction.

Ric cut his groove with a cutoff wheel in a Dremel tool.  I would want either the tool or the Dremel to be solidly mounted to something,  so I could hold the other with both hands for control.  As always with cutoff wheels, wear safety glasses and keep your head out of the wheel's plane of rotation.  

For a flat cutting edge, file the flat to almost full depth, and finish on a sharpening stone or flat diamond file.  Here one desires to avoid any hint of rounding at the flat's edges, creating a square edge that is actually quite sharp. If I were making another, I would use a double ended pin vise, and rig a guide to the back end, to prevent the pin vise rotating, while finishing the flat.  A piece of heavy wire, bent into a triangle perpendicular to the vise's axis, and clamped in the second collet, should suffice.

Having got your cutting point, trim the tool to final length, and turn the guide cone end, slightly rounding at the tip.  Giving tht  cutting is done when pressing on opposed axleboxes, the afctual length is not critical, given the spring of the side frames.  A little short is probably better than long, minimizing insertion stress on the sideframes.  Insertion stress may be further reduced by truncating the guide cone.  Excessive variation of axle length, between manufacturers, may make multiple tools desirable.

To use, make a cleanup spin under light pressure in each of an opposed pair of axleboxes, then insert a wheel set.  If the fit is at all tight, give the axleboxes another pass with slightly greater pressure.  Continue until the wheel set spins freely, with just a hint of side play.  With these conical bearing surfaces, minimum side play is needed to ensure consistent center plate height for any any pair of trucks. While checking for spin, make certain that the wheels are not dragging on the inner axlebox face, brake shoes, or any untrimmed molding flanges on Delren trucks.

If the fit is loose initially, one can stop with the cleanup and use as is.  Such trucks should still roll well, but they will have some side slop, which may actually help rigid trucks get over rough track.  Otherwise one needs longer axles or a shorter bolster.  NWSL axles are the longest HOn3' axles available, at a nominal 0.75".  Slightly longer HOn3'6" wheelsets may be available from Australian sources. My preferred way to narrow one piece truck frames is to splice bolster halves with a piece of K&S brass channel, or square tubing.  Cut and file the bolster top flat, cut out the center plate, and cut the brass splice to the required length between side frames. If too loose a fit over the bolster halves, add styrene strip fillers, but the bolster halves should be free enough to twist slightly, equalizing the weight on wheels.  Drill the splice sides at the two quarter points, about half depth on the bolster halves, then insert the bolster halves and drill through them, opening these holes slightly with a tapered  reamer.  Drill the splice centrally for your mounting screw, insert the bolster halves and glue bits of wire in to loosely retain them. 

It is probably best to paint trucks and wheel sets before cleaning axlebox bearing surfaces and fitting the wheel  sets.  After fitting, remove wheels and add a drop of well stirred Neolube, or other colloidal graphite, letting the alcohol evaporate before replacing wheels.  For painting wheel sets, I use a holder made from chopsticks.   Start with an un-split pair and drill a pair of guide pin holes through the splitting plane. Split, glue guide pins in one side, add a rubber band for compression,  and drill axle end holes in the other end,   This holder is also useful for cleaning paint from plated brass, nickel-silver, or zinc die-cast (Kadee & MT) wheels, using a brass brush wheel in the Dremel..  But do not be tempted to use the wire brush to spin Kadee wheels wile cleaning them - I have meltted axle ends.

The above will suffice for plastic or tin alloy side frames, or for just smoothing brass sideframes using a steel tool.  But for cleaning occasional brass bubble out of brass axleboxes with this type tool, one needs the rigidity of a mill, or a drill press fitted with X-Y table, as well as fixtures to clamp and hold the individual sideframes securely, while working on them.  With hand tools this is probably a matter of using micro chisels to pare down the bubble.  I am not aware of any source for these, but one might make them from high speed drill shanks, mounted in small center punch size holders,  Work holding fixitures will still be required.  I have not tried this.

John Stutz


Truck axlebox tuner - making & using

John Stutz
 

I have been making and using similar tools for about 30 years now, but using a lathe and mill to do so.

Ric's photo shows a way forward for those of us who do not have lathes. 

Apologies for the length,  This was ment to be short, but is fast approaching book length.  I hope some find it useful.

A brass tool will cut plastic, both Delren and most polymers used in 3-D modeling, with occasional resharpening.  Steel will last longer, but is a little harder to work with.  Use 1/8" stock if you are turning with a Dremel, either Ric's 3/16" or 1/4" stock if turning with a drill.  Cut your piece a little longer than the width over axleboxes, chuck it with a washer to protect the chuck, run at moderate speed, and file your point.

The point angle needs to be a little blunter than the axle points.  For rounded tip axles (Kadee) the tool point needs to be a little blunter than the taper behind the axle point. The idea here is to ensure that the truck rides on the axle's point,without any contact elsewhere.  When filing a point this way, there is a tendency to make it sharper than wanted, because the tip, at zero radius, while rotating is not actually moving. So start with an overly blunt point, stroke the file, and work your way back to the desired angle.  A coarse file can be used initially, but finish up with your finest single-cut file, always using a file handle. It will help if whatever you use to rotate the work is solidly mounted, so you can control the file with both hands.  A heavy drill press is ideal, but I have used a Dremel in their drill press, laid on its side

For all materials the cutting edge should be square to the tool's cone's surface.  This can be either a groove, as Ric used, or a half diameter flat.  The groove is safer for just cleaning out a well molded axlebox, as it provides a larger guide surface.    A groove for cutting right handed, when viewed from the side, point up, should pass just to the right of the point. The half flat version is actually a fair drill, and can also be used to deepen axlebox bearing cavities, but will serve for cleanup if used with light pressure. this will cut in either direction.

Ric cut his groove with a cutoff wheel in a Dremel tool.  I would want either the tool or the Dremel to be solidly mounted to something,  so I could hold the other with both hands for control.  As always with cutoff wheels, wear safety glasses and keep your head out of the wheel's plane of rotation.  

For a flat cutting edge, file the flat to almost full depth, and finish on a sharpening stone or flat diamond file.  Here one desires to avoid any hint of rounding at the flat's edges, creating a square edge that is actually quite sharp. If I were making another, I would use a double ended pin vise, and rig a guide to the back end, to prevent the pin vise rotating, while finishing the flat.  A piece of heavy wire, bent into a triangle perpendicular to the vise's axis, and clamped in the second collet, should suffice.

Having got your cutting point, trim the tool to final length, and turn the guide cone end, slightly rounding at the tip.  Giving tht  cutting is done when pressing on opposed axleboxes, the afctual length is not critical, given the spring of the side frames.  A little short is probably better than long, minimizing insertion stress on the sideframes.  Insertion stress may be further reduced by truncating the guide cone.  Excessive variation of axle length, between manufacturers, may make multiple tools desirable.

To use, make a cleanup spin under light pressure in each of an opposed pair of axleboxes, then insert a wheel set.  If the fit is at all tight, give the axleboxes another pass with slightly greater pressure.  Continue until the wheel set spins freely, with just a hint of side play.  With these conical bearing surfaces, minimum side play is needed to ensure consistent center plate height for any any pair of trucks. While checking for spin, make certain that the wheels are not dragging on the inner axlebox face, brake shoes, or any untrimmed molding flanges on Delren trucks.

If the fit is loose initially, one can stop with the cleanup and use as is.  Such trucks should still roll well, but they will have some side slop, which may actually help rigid trucks get over rough track.  Otherwise one needs longer axles or a shorter bolster.  NWSL axles are the longest HOn3' axles available, at a nominal 0.75".  Slightly longer HOn3'6" wheelsets may be available from Australian sources. My preferred way to narrow one piece truck frames is to splice bolster halves with a piece of K&S brass channel, or square tubing.  Cut and file the bolster top flat, cut out the center plate, and cut the brass splice to the required length between side frames. If too loose a fit over the bolster halves, add styrene strip fillers, but the bolster halves should be free enough to twist slightly, equalizing the weight on wheels.  Drill the splice sides at the two quarter points, about half depth on the bolster halves, then insert the bolster halves and drill through them, opening these holes slightly with a tapered  reamer.  Drill the splice centrally for your mounting screw, insert the bolster halves and glue bits of wire in to loosely retain them. 

It is probably best to paint trucks and wheel sets before cleaning axlebox bearing surfaces and fitting the wheel  sets.  After fitting, remove wheels and add a drop of well stirred Neolube, or other colloidal graphite, letting the alcohol evaporate before replacing wheels.  For painting wheel sets, I use a holder made from chopsticks.   Start with an un-split pair and drill a pair of guide pin holes through the splitting plane. Split, glue guide pins in one side, add a rubber band for compression,  and drill axle end holes in the other end,   This holder is also useful for cleaning paint from plated brass, nickel-silver, or zinc die-cast (Kadee & MT) wheels, using a brass brush wheel in the Dremel..  But do not be tempted to use the wire brush to spin Kadee wheels wile cleaning them - I have meltted axle ends.

The above will suffice for plastic or tin alloy side frames, or for just smoothing brass sideframes using a steel tool.  But for cleaning occasional brass bubble out of brass axleboxes with this type tool, one needs the rigidity of a mill, or a drill press fitted with X-Y table, as well as fixtures to clamp and hold the individual sideframes securely, while working on them.  With hand tools this is probably a matter of using micro chisels to pare down the bubble.  I am not aware of any source for these, but one might make them from high speed drill shanks, mounted in small center punch size holders,  Work holding fixitures will still be required.  I have not tried this.

John Stutz


Re: Tortoise side mounting???

richard firth
 


You could try the 'Remote Tortoise Mount'
 
go to 'circuitron.com
 
regards
 
Richard

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2020 12:59 PM
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Tortoise side mounting???

I know it’s heresy to suggest a manual throw, but if that is possible, I suggest a remote mounted manual throw such as a Caboose Industries ground throw. They can be mounted on the outside on the fascia and connected with a wire. All of my turnouts are operated that way. Of course, some people use simple knobs.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Sep 27, 2020, at 5:51 PM, asandrini <asandrini@...> wrote:

I have only 12" between my middle and upper deck.  The center shelf is 15" deep, while the upper shelf is 22" deep. With a 3" fascia, I can see the bottom half of two tortoise machines located near the front edge of the shelf.

I have had to embed two machines in my lower level in 2" foam and used R/C bell ranks to change the direction of force from the machine to the turnout. Works perfectly.

My center shelf has no foam to surface mount the machine, nor do I have the space to rig up a bellcrank system.

I was wondering: 

Glue a block of 1x2 under the turnout, beneath the subroadbed

Mount the machine with the moving mechanism facing up

Heated a piece of wire and insert it into the moving black block 

Run the end of the wire up to the turnout throwbar

Would this work?

I might need to use a finer wire, as the length of throw may be too much.  The lighter wire would increase in pressure at the end limits to about the same stress as the larger wire in the normal operating position.


Any ideas?

Al



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.




Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Tortoise side mounting???

Don Ball
 

You might want to try these very flat switch machines. I have seen them in operation and they work well.



Don Ball

On Mon, Sep 28, 2020 at 9:59 PM Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:
I know it’s heresy to suggest a manual throw, but if that is possible, I suggest a remote mounted manual throw such as a Caboose Industries ground throw. They can be mounted on the outside on the fascia and connected with a wire. All of my turnouts are operated that way. Of course, some people use simple knobs.

On Sep 27, 2020, at 5:51 PM, asandrini <asandrini@...> wrote:

I have only 12" between my middle and upper deck.  The center shelf is 15" deep, while the upper shelf is 22" deep. With a 3" fascia, I can see the bottom half of two tortoise machines located near the front edge of the shelf.

I have had to embed two machines in my lower level in 2" foam and used R/C bell ranks to change the direction of force from the machine to the turnout. Works perfectly.

My center shelf has no foam to surface mount the machine, nor do I have the space to rig up a bellcrank system.

I was wondering: 

Glue a block of 1x2 under the turnout, beneath the subroadbed

Mount the machine with the moving mechanism facing up

Heated a piece of wire and insert it into the moving black block 

Run the end of the wire up to the turnout throwbar

Would this work?

I might need to use a finer wire, as the length of throw may be too much.  The lighter wire would increase in pressure at the end limits to about the same stress as the larger wire in the normal operating position.


Any ideas?

Al



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.




Re: Tortoise side mounting???

Jim Marlett
 

I know it’s heresy to suggest a manual throw, but if that is possible, I suggest a remote mounted manual throw such as a Caboose Industries ground throw. They can be mounted on the outside on the fascia and connected with a wire. All of my turnouts are operated that way. Of course, some people use simple knobs.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Sep 27, 2020, at 5:51 PM, asandrini <asandrini@...> wrote:

I have only 12" between my middle and upper deck.  The center shelf is 15" deep, while the upper shelf is 22" deep. With a 3" fascia, I can see the bottom half of two tortoise machines located near the front edge of the shelf.

I have had to embed two machines in my lower level in 2" foam and used R/C bell ranks to change the direction of force from the machine to the turnout. Works perfectly.

My center shelf has no foam to surface mount the machine, nor do I have the space to rig up a bellcrank system.

I was wondering: 

Glue a block of 1x2 under the turnout, beneath the subroadbed

Mount the machine with the moving mechanism facing up

Heated a piece of wire and insert it into the moving black block 

Run the end of the wire up to the turnout throwbar

Would this work?

I might need to use a finer wire, as the length of throw may be too much.  The lighter wire would increase in pressure at the end limits to about the same stress as the larger wire in the normal operating position.


Any ideas?

Al



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.




Re: Truck tuner

Bruce
 

Nice job Ric!


With cinders in your eyes,
Bruce
419-602-3584 cell



On Sun, Sep 27, 2020 at 9:30 PM Ric Case <ebtmodeler@...> wrote:




Did six axle sets in about 15 minutes!


Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694


Re: truck journal tuning tool

Bruce
 

I have ordered a 2-flute carbide end mill.  I will let everyone know how well it works when it arrives.



With cinders in your eyes,
Bruce
419-602-3584 cell



On Sun, Sep 27, 2020 at 9:57 PM <Climax@...> wrote:
Center drill.  Used in machine shops mostly in a lathe to precisely position a hole for either the dead or live center to be placed when turning the stock.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dale Buxton
Sent: Sep 27, 2020 8:50 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] truck journal tuning tool

It stops cutting because there is no cutting edge on the very tip. Just the point of the pivoting tip. The cutting edge (Only 1 flute) of the blade is aligned with the angle of the cone edge. There is a name for this kind Drill blade but I don’t know what it is.

Shop Chief

On Sun, Sep 27, 2020 at 18:01 lloyd lehrer <lloydlehrer@...> wrote:
The reboxx instructions says it stops cutting when its removed the excess material and arrived at the proper angle. So there must be something in the shape that stops the cutting. If it was just a drill flute I cant see that happening.

lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097

On Sun, Sep 27, 2020, 6:50 AM Mark Kasprowicz <mark@...> wrote:
I too had thought of shortening the HO version so I'd be interested to know if it is feasible.

Mark K
Oxon England.












--
lloyd lehrer










Re: LaBelle F&CC kits

John Stutz
 

Thanks Ken - I wondered about length differences.

But still, this sort of modification should give a fair impression of the F&CC car. And if the point is to have something other than the uniquely D&RGW passenger cars that are ubiquitous on HOn3 layouts, it provides a way to start.

And a second thanks for your book of CaS passenger car drawings. You put a lot of work into that, and it provides a very good introduction to the many alternatives to the D&RGW cars.

John Stutz

On September 24, 2020 at 1:29 PM "Ken Martin via groups.io" <kmartin537@...> wrote:

John,

What is not apparant from the drawing is that the F&CC car is 40’ long while the D&RG car is 38’.
That makes it hard to mod a D&RG car to F&CC.

Ken Martin


On Sep 24, 2020, at 1:03 PM, John Stutz < john.stutz@...> wrote:

Rob

Thanks very much for posting LaBelle F&CC coach & combine instructions.

Looking the drawings over, I believe that the primary difference between LaBelle's D&RGW and F&CC coaches, is the ratio between the window and pillar widths, with the F&CC cars having the higher ratio characteristic of their later construction date. This is probably why the F&CC kits were dropped from the line, since the narrower pillars would have increased the proportion of scrapped car sides. 



 

 


Re: Is there market "demand" for 3D printed HOn3 trucks?

John Stutz
 

Jim

The McCord is already available 3-D printed for HOn3, using Kadee wheels.  I believe that I have actually purchased them from two sources.   Colorado is still well covered by PSC, and their Delren versions roll as well as Blackstone's.  As do the new Kadee HOn3 truck lineup, which include an excellent EBT Vulcan..  But there are alternatives to the McCord, but I will leave it to our eastern modelers to speak for themselves. 

In the west, the SPNG closed out with a variety of archbar trucks, all well described in Bader's recent book.  Further north, White Pass found that the T-section Bettendorf sideframes, under their ex. C&S cars, tended to crack with age.  They substituted a PC&F U-section version that has a profile verry similar to the originals, and quite distinct from the AC&F Bettendorfs used in Colorado.  Also, during WW-II both White Pass and Oahu ended up with cars diverted from an Argentinian order, that were fitted with a distinctly arched version of the Bettendorf, generally denoted as "Estado" from the cast on lettering.  Neither has ever been produced in Hon3. The Estados were used under White Pass's 11xx cars, their 1st generation steel container cars built from the Argentinian car frames.  There are examples in the lower 48, at Sumpter and Mid-Continent(?). .  

The D&RG 3'7" archbar was fairly specific to the D&RG.  Most other NG roads used soemthing else, and there were many variations.  RGM did a good job of filling demand for the more common alternatives, and if no one steps up to replace Eric, his line will be a good example of what will need replacing.

John Stutz

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