Date   

Re: A Wee Bit O' HOn3 History.

Mark Lewis
 

Earl,

What a treasure!
I have never heard of nor seen such a HOn3 kit from MDC.

Thanks for sharing the great photos!

Mark Lewis
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.


Re: A Wee Bit O' HOn3 History.

Russ Norris
 

It's a lot bigger than the Mantua 0-6-0 I converted into EBT #3.  But it's also a lot more detailed.  Very nice, although I would replace the Lindsey motor with a can.

Russ

On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 3:46 PM Earl Knoob <earlk489@...> wrote:
Here is a bit of HOn3 history.  I acquired this in the mid-1970's.  I came on the original box, which I cannot seem to locate, but the label on the box end
clearly stated "Roundhouse Products  -  0-6-0 switcher  -  HOn3 gauge  -  Kit."  I started to assemble it.  I got it to run anyway.

 
So, here we have a basic 1950's Model Die Casting/Roundhouse products 0-6-0 switch engine, based on a Southern Pacific prototype.  52" drivers, slope back tender.  Very simple somewhat crude details.  Everything is die-cast, no plastic here.  Just like the engines our dads populated their railroads with in the 50's and 60's.


But, turn it on its back and what is this?  The drivers (and the tender trucks) are clearly 3-foot narrow gauge.  Just like the box label says....
You can see where the frame dies had been narrowed to install narrow gauge driver sets.  Being the frame was cast in a steel die (as in "Die-casting" - get it?), it was a pretty simple matter to insert steel plates on each side of the die to make the frame narrower.  A special bottom retainer plate was also created.


Notice the cool die-cast main rod as weel as the nifty stamped brass, highly derailed side rods.  The motor is a Lindsey.  A standard item for many HO models in the early-mid 1950's.  My dad had some early Varney and Mantua engines with Lindsey motors.  It draws about 3/4 of an amp under load...


 Another underside shot.  The cylinders seem to be stock standard gauge items, accounting the splayed out main rods running at an angle.

 
Another motor shot.  All other MDC 0-6-0's I've run across have a standard "Pittman-type" motor driving the #2 axle.  But the ones I've seen might have been much newer.  A Pittman motor would not fit between the HOn3 drivers.


Here is the tender underframe showing the trucks.  The side frames are standard for the standard gauge model but were fitted with special bolsters to make them narrow gauge.

So, there you have it.  Anyone else have one of these monuments to early HOn3 motive power?  Anybody ever even heard of one of these?  It certainly makes a monster of an HOn3 locomotive.


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


A Wee Bit O' HOn3 History.

Earl Knoob
 

Here is a bit of HOn3 history.  I acquired this in the mid-1970's.  I came on the original box, which I cannot seem to locate, but the label on the box end
clearly stated "Roundhouse Products  -  0-6-0 switcher  -  HOn3 gauge  -  Kit."  I started to assemble it.  I got it to run anyway.

 
So, here we have a basic 1950's Model Die Casting/Roundhouse products 0-6-0 switch engine, based on a Southern Pacific prototype.  52" drivers, slope back tender.  Very simple somewhat crude details.  Everything is die-cast, no plastic here.  Just like the engines our dads populated their railroads with in the 50's and 60's.


But, turn it on its back and what is this?  The drivers (and the tender trucks) are clearly 3-foot narrow gauge.  Just like the box label says....
You can see where the frame dies had been narrowed to install narrow gauge driver sets.  Being the frame was cast in a steel die (as in "Die-casting" - get it?), it was a pretty simple matter to insert steel plates on each side of the die to make the frame narrower.  A special bottom retainer plate was also created.


Notice the cool die-cast main rod as weel as the nifty stamped brass, highly derailed side rods.  The motor is a Lindsey.  A standard item for many HO models in the early-mid 1950's.  My dad had some early Varney and Mantua engines with Lindsey motors.  It draws about 3/4 of an amp under load...


 Another underside shot.  The cylinders seem to be stock standard gauge items, accounting the splayed out main rods running at an angle.

 
Another motor shot.  All other MDC 0-6-0's I've run across have a standard "Pittman-type" motor driving the #2 axle.  But the ones I've seen might have been much newer.  A Pittman motor would not fit between the HOn3 drivers.


Here is the tender underframe showing the trucks.  The side frames are standard for the standard gauge model but were fitted with special bolsters to make them narrow gauge.

So, there you have it.  Anyone else have one of these monuments to early HOn3 motive power?  Anybody ever even heard of one of these?  It certainly makes a monster of an HOn3 locomotive.


Re: My string of sausages

Jeff Reynolds
 

Hollingsworth,
It's good to see that I'm not alone. I had a dozen pair of trucks that i put on the 'problem children' of rolling stock, so I'm not even close. Ken is not close either with two Blackstone C-19's.
jefe


Re: My string of sausages

Ken Martin
 

I have no Blackstone rolling stock, but I did buy a couple of C-19’s and then put beartraps on them as I model C&S.

Ken Martin

On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:48 AM, Jeff Reynolds <jefe4x4@...> wrote:
I may be the only one on the planet who has no Blackstone rolling stock or motive power of any kind. I just missed the whole Blackstone episode. I


Re: conoco tank cars

Ken Martin
 

Years ago I took a resin casting of the CONX 8 tank and mounted it on a Scotia Scale flat and made it no 5. I still run it even though I have a Tomalco kit for 5 with a brass tank.
When MDC came out with the tank car lettered CONX 6 I took it and built a “wide” frame. This was before the RRob books came out.
Both still run well on the club layout and no one has called me out on them.

Ken Martin





Re: conoco tank cars

Mark Lewis
 

Rob,

That WP car looks great and does not overpower the BS tank car in a consist. Perfect fodder for a freelance HOn3 modeler.

Mark Lewis
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.


Re: conoco tank cars

Dale Buxton <dbtuathaddana@...>
 

Nice Rob! The variation of tank cars sizes works well for White Pass consists. Your photos prove my point in a around about way too. If your P2K type 21 was alone or with other type 21 cars. No one would know it is not a 6000 gallon car like the UTLX narrow frame cars or a 6500 gallon car like the CONOCO wide frame cars.

I talked to a friend about the CONOCO cars over the weekend. I consider him one of the most knowledgeable persons on narrow gauge tank cars after Dave Grandt, the late Dave Garcia, Stan Schwedler and John Stutz.

Dave Grandt found a data sheet on the  CONOCO cars. The wide frame cars were built by General American not the Rio Grande in Alamosa as Sloan says in his book. My friend says the cars were built with wide frames to accommodate standard gauge trucks. He and I and Dave Garcia agreed that they probably rolled into Alamosa on standard gauge trucks. Where the Grande switched them out to narrow gauge ones. There does not seem to be any historical paperwork to prove that the new trucks came from the defunct Ingoldsby coal gons. Only that the Ingoldsby trucks were rated for a higher tonnage than the D&RG 3’7” trucks and they look the same as the Ingoldsby trucks. That and the fact that the Grande never seemed to throw any narrow gauge trucks away.

Dale Buxton



On Mon, Aug 3, 2020 at 10:15 Robert Bell via groups.io <ionhoss=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dale,
Some years ago I built one of the P2K type 21 8000 gal cars and put it on a pair of Grandt Line Hon3 Bettendorf trucks.  I have since changed out the trucks to MTL Bettendorfs.  It is a large tanker, but not as big as others used by the White Pass.  The photos show the P2K (#47) with a coup,e of BS narrow framers and a converted Athearn 10K tanker that I am not done with.

Rob Bell
Modeling the WP&YR in 
Waynesville, NC










Re: My string of sausages

p. f. hollingsworth
 

On Mon, Aug 3, 2020 at 07:48 AM, Jeff Reynolds wrote:
Don,
. Seeing all the Blackstone rolling stock reminds me that I may be the only one on the planet who has no Blackstone rolling stock or motive power of any kind.
Jeff, you aren't the only one at all. My stuff does have a single pair of Blackstone trucks- and those are on an MDC tank conversion that Bob Veefkind gifted me some time back. 


Re: Abteilung weathering.

Mark Rosche
 

@Dave:  had that happen (crinkling) when the oils were not completely cured...

I should have mentioned „Do NOT use an acrylic based matte clear coat over the oils...that is a disaster waiting to happen as the varnish beads on the oil paint“...Testors Dullcoat is your friend over oils (If you can still get it)...also, Abteilung has a matte effect thinner available that really flattens down the oils...

Regards,

Mark

Don‘t take life too seriously...no one gets out alive anyway....

On 3. Aug 2020, at 17:51, "Climax@..." <Climax@... wrote:


I know very well from experiences that some applications turn out really great on models, but then again I have had some disasters.  I think my biggest was when I was almost finished and applied a clear coat over it and the paint just crinkled up into a huge mess that I had to completely strip and start over.  I think all of use probably have had that happen at least once followed by things we probably should not have said.
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: "Mark Rosche via groups.io"
Sent: Aug 3, 2020 11:15 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Abteilung weathering.

I have been experimenting with the Abteilung oils and I find them very forgiving (once the acrylic base has been cured completely). As they are slow drying, one can correct „mistakes“ for quite a while with some „odorless thinner“...once you get everything exactly as you want it, clear matte  lacquer coat it and you are done 😁👍🏻

Regards,

Mark

Don‘t take life too seriously...no one gets out alive anyway....

On 3. Aug 2020, at 16:42, Lee Gustafson via groups.io <bagustaf@...> wrote:

FWIW, not to high jack the thread or this narrow gauge group, I suggest that you Google military modelers sites as the use of oil paints for weathering is quite common. The use of dis-similar types of paints, i.e. acrylics as a base paint and oils as the weathering paints, is the basis for the technique. Oil based paints are relatively slow drying and once acrylics have cured the oil based paints do not attack the acrylics. As always a learning curve is present and practice on something other than an expensive brass locomotive or a prized scratch built model is advised. Best wishes.

Lee Gustafson 


On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:40 AM, Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:

As I understand it, Abteilung is a brand of high quality oil paints designed for modeling. What this means is that any tutorial on weathering with oil paints will show you how to use them. I would do a search for weathering with oil paints. Same with acrylics.

Do a web search for each technique. Then if you want, click the images button related to both searches and you will get plenty of up close images. There are a ton of them out there.

It seems to me that the extra pay video sites like Train Master TV and MR Video Plus have had tutorials on weathering with both acrylics and oils. I don’t think I would subscribe just for those topics, but if you already subscribe to these services, then you might see if my old man memory is correct.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Aug 2, 2020, at 8:32 PM, Dennis Carrell via groups.io <dennis.carrell@...> wrote:

I realize I'm late to this discussion!  I just recently watched the amazing video that sparked such a firestorm of interest. One of the things that was frustrating about the video was a lack of close ups on the finished models!  So that leads me to my first question. 

1)  Is there a gallery of photos somewhere that show these gorgeous models somewhere?

2)  Has anyone attempted this process with acrylics?  I'm guessing that watering down the pigments in acrylics just won't leave the same effect on the model?  Or is there another more sinister reason not to use acrylics on brass? 

I have yet to paint a brass model which is the whole reason I stumbled on to the video, I have a project 2-8-0 consolidated that I will be starting soon and I'm researching both painting and working on brass models.  There is not a lot out there in the how-to videos on painting brass.

~Dennis


Re: conoco tank cars

Robert Bell
 

Dale,
Some years ago I built one of the P2K type 21 8000 gal cars and put it on a pair of Grandt Line Hon3 Bettendorf trucks.  I have since changed out the trucks to MTL Bettendorfs.  It is a large tanker, but not as big as others used by the White Pass.  The photos show the P2K (#47) with a coup,e of BS narrow framers and a converted Athearn 10K tanker that I am not done with.

Rob Bell
Modeling the WP&YR in 
Waynesville, NC










Re: Abteilung weathering.

Climax@...
 

I know very well from experiences that some applications turn out really great on models, but then again I have had some disasters.  I think my biggest was when I was almost finished and applied a clear coat over it and the paint just crinkled up into a huge mess that I had to completely strip and start over.  I think all of use probably have had that happen at least once followed by things we probably should not have said.
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: "Mark Rosche via groups.io"
Sent: Aug 3, 2020 11:15 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Abteilung weathering.

I have been experimenting with the Abteilung oils and I find them very forgiving (once the acrylic base has been cured completely). As they are slow drying, one can correct „mistakes“ for quite a while with some „odorless thinner“...once you get everything exactly as you want it, clear matte  lacquer coat it and you are done 😁👍🏻

Regards,

Mark

Don‘t take life too seriously...no one gets out alive anyway....

On 3. Aug 2020, at 16:42, Lee Gustafson via groups.io <bagustaf@...> wrote:

FWIW, not to high jack the thread or this narrow gauge group, I suggest that you Google military modelers sites as the use of oil paints for weathering is quite common. The use of dis-similar types of paints, i.e. acrylics as a base paint and oils as the weathering paints, is the basis for the technique. Oil based paints are relatively slow drying and once acrylics have cured the oil based paints do not attack the acrylics. As always a learning curve is present and practice on something other than an expensive brass locomotive or a prized scratch built model is advised. Best wishes.

Lee Gustafson 


On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:40 AM, Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:

As I understand it, Abteilung is a brand of high quality oil paints designed for modeling. What this means is that any tutorial on weathering with oil paints will show you how to use them. I would do a search for weathering with oil paints. Same with acrylics.

Do a web search for each technique. Then if you want, click the images button related to both searches and you will get plenty of up close images. There are a ton of them out there.

It seems to me that the extra pay video sites like Train Master TV and MR Video Plus have had tutorials on weathering with both acrylics and oils. I don’t think I would subscribe just for those topics, but if you already subscribe to these services, then you might see if my old man memory is correct.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Aug 2, 2020, at 8:32 PM, Dennis Carrell via groups.io <dennis.carrell@...> wrote:

I realize I'm late to this discussion!  I just recently watched the amazing video that sparked such a firestorm of interest. One of the things that was frustrating about the video was a lack of close ups on the finished models!  So that leads me to my first question. 

1)  Is there a gallery of photos somewhere that show these gorgeous models somewhere?

2)  Has anyone attempted this process with acrylics?  I'm guessing that watering down the pigments in acrylics just won't leave the same effect on the model?  Or is there another more sinister reason not to use acrylics on brass? 

I have yet to paint a brass model which is the whole reason I stumbled on to the video, I have a project 2-8-0 consolidated that I will be starting soon and I'm researching both painting and working on brass models.  There is not a lot out there in the how-to videos on painting brass.

~Dennis


Re: Abteilung weathering.

Mark Rosche
 

forgot to add the pics (albeit in Sn3)...



Regards,

Mark

Don‘t take life too seriously...no one gets out alive anyway....

On 3. Aug 2020, at 16:42, Lee Gustafson via groups.io <bagustaf@...> wrote:

FWIW, not to high jack the thread or this narrow gauge group, I suggest that you Google military modelers sites as the use of oil paints for weathering is quite common. The use of dis-similar types of paints, i.e. acrylics as a base paint and oils as the weathering paints, is the basis for the technique. Oil based paints are relatively slow drying and once acrylics have cured the oil based paints do not attack the acrylics. As always a learning curve is present and practice on something other than an expensive brass locomotive or a prized scratch built model is advised. Best wishes.

Lee Gustafson 


On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:40 AM, Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:

As I understand it, Abteilung is a brand of high quality oil paints designed for modeling. What this means is that any tutorial on weathering with oil paints will show you how to use them. I would do a search for weathering with oil paints. Same with acrylics.

Do a web search for each technique. Then if you want, click the images button related to both searches and you will get plenty of up close images. There are a ton of them out there.

It seems to me that the extra pay video sites like Train Master TV and MR Video Plus have had tutorials on weathering with both acrylics and oils. I don’t think I would subscribe just for those topics, but if you already subscribe to these services, then you might see if my old man memory is correct.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Aug 2, 2020, at 8:32 PM, Dennis Carrell via groups.io <dennis.carrell@...> wrote:

I realize I'm late to this discussion!  I just recently watched the amazing video that sparked such a firestorm of interest. One of the things that was frustrating about the video was a lack of close ups on the finished models!  So that leads me to my first question. 

1)  Is there a gallery of photos somewhere that show these gorgeous models somewhere?

2)  Has anyone attempted this process with acrylics?  I'm guessing that watering down the pigments in acrylics just won't leave the same effect on the model?  Or is there another more sinister reason not to use acrylics on brass? 

I have yet to paint a brass model which is the whole reason I stumbled on to the video, I have a project 2-8-0 consolidated that I will be starting soon and I'm researching both painting and working on brass models.  There is not a lot out there in the how-to videos on painting brass.

~Dennis


Re: Abteilung weathering.

Mark Rosche
 

I have been experimenting with the Abteilung oils and I find them very forgiving (once the acrylic base has been cured completely). As they are slow drying, one can correct „mistakes“ for quite a while with some „odorless thinner“...once you get everything exactly as you want it, clear matte  lacquer coat it and you are done 😁👍🏻

Regards,

Mark

Don‘t take life too seriously...no one gets out alive anyway....

On 3. Aug 2020, at 16:42, Lee Gustafson via groups.io <bagustaf@...> wrote:

FWIW, not to high jack the thread or this narrow gauge group, I suggest that you Google military modelers sites as the use of oil paints for weathering is quite common. The use of dis-similar types of paints, i.e. acrylics as a base paint and oils as the weathering paints, is the basis for the technique. Oil based paints are relatively slow drying and once acrylics have cured the oil based paints do not attack the acrylics. As always a learning curve is present and practice on something other than an expensive brass locomotive or a prized scratch built model is advised. Best wishes.

Lee Gustafson 


On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:40 AM, Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:

As I understand it, Abteilung is a brand of high quality oil paints designed for modeling. What this means is that any tutorial on weathering with oil paints will show you how to use them. I would do a search for weathering with oil paints. Same with acrylics.

Do a web search for each technique. Then if you want, click the images button related to both searches and you will get plenty of up close images. There are a ton of them out there.

It seems to me that the extra pay video sites like Train Master TV and MR Video Plus have had tutorials on weathering with both acrylics and oils. I don’t think I would subscribe just for those topics, but if you already subscribe to these services, then you might see if my old man memory is correct.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Aug 2, 2020, at 8:32 PM, Dennis Carrell via groups.io <dennis.carrell@...> wrote:

I realize I'm late to this discussion!  I just recently watched the amazing video that sparked such a firestorm of interest. One of the things that was frustrating about the video was a lack of close ups on the finished models!  So that leads me to my first question. 

1)  Is there a gallery of photos somewhere that show these gorgeous models somewhere?

2)  Has anyone attempted this process with acrylics?  I'm guessing that watering down the pigments in acrylics just won't leave the same effect on the model?  Or is there another more sinister reason not to use acrylics on brass? 

I have yet to paint a brass model which is the whole reason I stumbled on to the video, I have a project 2-8-0 consolidated that I will be starting soon and I'm researching both painting and working on brass models.  There is not a lot out there in the how-to videos on painting brass.

~Dennis


Re: My string of sausages

Jeff Reynolds
 

Don,
It has been a long time since I've seen your work in pix. You have saved me a lot of time with your cross index of photos, which btw, is a never ending string of sausage pulls. Seeing all the Blackstone rolling stock reminds me that I may be the only one on the planet who has no Blackstone rolling stock or motive power of any kind. I just missed the whole Blackstone episode. I have a dozen or so Blackstone freight trucks which are the best. I've given away most of my brass cars so only plastic and wood rolling stock remains. Some plastic tank cars:


Re: Abteilung weathering.

Lee Gustafson
 

FWIW, not to high jack the thread or this narrow gauge group, I suggest that you Google military modelers sites as the use of oil paints for weathering is quite common. The use of dis-similar types of paints, i.e. acrylics as a base paint and oils as the weathering paints, is the basis for the technique. Oil based paints are relatively slow drying and once acrylics have cured the oil based paints do not attack the acrylics. As always a learning curve is present and practice on something other than an expensive brass locomotive or a prized scratch built model is advised. Best wishes.

Lee Gustafson 


On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:40 AM, Jim Marlett <jmarlett@...> wrote:

As I understand it, Abteilung is a brand of high quality oil paints designed for modeling. What this means is that any tutorial on weathering with oil paints will show you how to use them. I would do a search for weathering with oil paints. Same with acrylics.

Do a web search for each technique. Then if you want, click the images button related to both searches and you will get plenty of up close images. There are a ton of them out there.

It seems to me that the extra pay video sites like Train Master TV and MR Video Plus have had tutorials on weathering with both acrylics and oils. I don’t think I would subscribe just for those topics, but if you already subscribe to these services, then you might see if my old man memory is correct.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Aug 2, 2020, at 8:32 PM, Dennis Carrell via groups.io <dennis.carrell@...> wrote:

I realize I'm late to this discussion!  I just recently watched the amazing video that sparked such a firestorm of interest. One of the things that was frustrating about the video was a lack of close ups on the finished models!  So that leads me to my first question. 

1)  Is there a gallery of photos somewhere that show these gorgeous models somewhere?

2)  Has anyone attempted this process with acrylics?  I'm guessing that watering down the pigments in acrylics just won't leave the same effect on the model?  Or is there another more sinister reason not to use acrylics on brass? 

I have yet to paint a brass model which is the whole reason I stumbled on to the video, I have a project 2-8-0 consolidated that I will be starting soon and I'm researching both painting and working on brass models.  There is not a lot out there in the how-to videos on painting brass.

~Dennis


Re: My string of sausages

Don Bergman
 

Bob,

I used whatever frame came with the tank. 

Don

Don, are your MDC tanks made into the frameless? I made up a string of those some time ago using the PSC bolster and they turn out fairly well. I was hoping to somehow use the MDC frame for the narrow frame tanks. The utlx frames are much wider (about 4') than the MDC frames (about 2'). The closest I can find are the old COLX as shown in Grandts pictorial. The MDC frames mill down fairly well but lots of work and not practical for most modelers. Again -not looking for a contest model. I am working on a proto 2000 8,000 gallon tank that can be made into Conoco # 44 with some modifications .     Bob Veefkind 


Re: My string of sausages

Robert Veefkind <snookdust@...>
 

 
 
In a message dated 8/2/2020 8:45:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, DBRenegade@... writes:
 
 
The next photo shows the difference.  MDC on the right.  See below for the 3 in the string.
 
Don, are your MDC tanks made into the frameless? I made up a string of those some time ago using the PSC bolster and they turn out fairly well. I was hoping to somehow use the MDC frame for the narrow frame tanks. The utlx frames are much wider (about 4') than the MDC frames (about 2'). The closest I can find are the old COLX as shown in Grandts pictorial. The MDC frames mill down fairly well but lots of work and not practical for most modelers. Again -not looking for a contest model. I am working on a proto 2000 8,000 gallon tank that can be made into Conoco # 44 with some modifications .     Bob Veefkind 
 
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
They are the 1st, 2nd, and 9th.


Re: Abteilung weathering.

Jim Marlett
 

As I understand it, Abteilung is a brand of high quality oil paints designed for modeling. What this means is that any tutorial on weathering with oil paints will show you how to use them. I would do a search for weathering with oil paints. Same with acrylics.

Do a web search for each technique. Then if you want, click the images button related to both searches and you will get plenty of up close images. There are a ton of them out there.

It seems to me that the extra pay video sites like Train Master TV and MR Video Plus have had tutorials on weathering with both acrylics and oils. I don’t think I would subscribe just for those topics, but if you already subscribe to these services, then you might see if my old man memory is correct.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/


On Aug 2, 2020, at 8:32 PM, Dennis Carrell via groups.io <dennis.carrell@...> wrote:

I realize I'm late to this discussion!  I just recently watched the amazing video that sparked such a firestorm of interest. One of the things that was frustrating about the video was a lack of close ups on the finished models!  So that leads me to my first question. 

1)  Is there a gallery of photos somewhere that show these gorgeous models somewhere?

2)  Has anyone attempted this process with acrylics?  I'm guessing that watering down the pigments in acrylics just won't leave the same effect on the model?  Or is there another more sinister reason not to use acrylics on brass? 

I have yet to paint a brass model which is the whole reason I stumbled on to the video, I have a project 2-8-0 consolidated that I will be starting soon and I'm researching both painting and working on brass models.  There is not a lot out there in the how-to videos on painting brass.

~Dennis


Re: My string of sausages

Steen Mortensen
 

Hi Don!

 

You inspire  me to confess my age as 78 modeling 1878 SPCRR…..SO MUCH FUN !!

 

Steen

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Climax@...
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 9:53 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] My string of sausages

 

Going along with that, I am 73 now so I as scratch building back in the 60's.  One habit I got into was with an ink pen or Sharpy I would write the date I built any structure and some cars, on the bottom before I put it on my layout.  Sometimes its interesting to pick up a structure and turn it over, then think back.  It brings a lot of memories back and isn't that the whole purpose of life, making memories?

-----Original Message-----
From: gnorwood6 gnorwood6
Sent: Aug 2, 2020 10:06 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] My string of sausages

Don,

The only obvious thing is the slightly clunky hand rail posts. Quite acceptable from my point of view.

Like the comment about your bridge 45B. That is a very good reason to justify being included on the layout.

Attached is one photo of my layout with part of my very short high line.

Regards,

Gary

 



------ Original Message ------
From: "Don Bergman" <DBRenegade@...>
To: "HOn3@groups.io" <HOn3@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, 3 Aug, 2020 At 10:45 AM
Subject: [HOn3] My string of sausages

Attached find several photos of my string of tankers.  One kit, 1 brass, 3  MDC, and the rest  are Blackstone.  Look at the first 2 photos and pick out the 3 MDC.  They are different but back when I purchased them there were not many low-cost options.  No visitor  has noted the difference.   I am sure those paying attention to NG tank cars will note the difference.  However, not big enough for me to keep them off the layout.

 

The next photo shows the difference.  MDC on the right.  See below for the 3 in the string.

 

The first photo shows Peak at the bottom, Anderson loop on the right, Ames tank in the middle and Trout Lake Tank on the top.

The Second shows looking over Ophir 45-A to Bridges 44-A, 46-B, C, & F

Bridge 46-B is not RGS prototypical but I built that deck truss bridge from Model Railroader plans when in High School, so it stays on the layout!  🙂

 

Don Bergman

 

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They are the 1st, 2nd, and 9th.

     

 

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