Date   
Re: EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

Climax@...
 

I think a lot of us are limited in space to a model of the model of the prototype!
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Russ Norris
Sent: Nov 12, 2019 8:36 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

It is VERY large, especially for modeling purposes.  I made a floor plan for the locomotive and machine shop, then laid the plan over my existing shop complex (much of which was selectively compressed).  The full size locomotive and machine shop covered almost the entire south end of the shops!  That's not counting the car shop which is even bigger, as can be seen from Ric's photo.  My shop scene is 9 feet long and 2-3 feet wide, so it's not small.  I would have loved to have a full size machine shop but there was simply no space for it.  If you have the room I would certainly support it. But many of us are not so fortunate. 

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 8:01 AM Bruce <in2trains@...> wrote:
Ric,

Your photo is inspiring and shows how large the complex is!

Bruce Bowie
Huron Ohio

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 7:55 AM Ric Case <ebtmodeler@...> wrote:



The tracks too the right are for car repair and actual car storage!
The two tracks in the center are for the locomotives repairs.
The car repair shop contained all the wood working tools, all the machines for working on the locomotive and steel cars were located in the left hand side of the structure.
The EBT was a complete entity in its own little place.
My structure when complete will have tracks for all the repairs the railroad will need to do! Well at least look like they could.
Shop cars were used to move deck planks for the flat cars and boxes.
By the twenties most of the wood cars had been faded out of service and the car repair shop was used mainly for storage.
Most of the narrow gauge railroads
Had to be self sufficient in all ways! The EBT built all of their steel hopper and box cars along with the steel flats starting around 1913 ! They purchased the first cars then started building their own.
Just a little bit more information to cloud everyone’s minds.
Enjoy
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694




--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

Russ Norris
 

It is VERY large, especially for modeling purposes.  I made a floor plan for the locomotive and machine shop, then laid the plan over my existing shop complex (much of which was selectively compressed).  The full size locomotive and machine shop covered almost the entire south end of the shops!  That's not counting the car shop which is even bigger, as can be seen from Ric's photo.  My shop scene is 9 feet long and 2-3 feet wide, so it's not small.  I would have loved to have a full size machine shop but there was simply no space for it.  If you have the room I would certainly support it. But many of us are not so fortunate. 


On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 8:01 AM Bruce <in2trains@...> wrote:
Ric,

Your photo is inspiring and shows how large the complex is!

Bruce Bowie
Huron Ohio

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 7:55 AM Ric Case <ebtmodeler@...> wrote:



The tracks too the right are for car repair and actual car storage!
The two tracks in the center are for the locomotives repairs.
The car repair shop contained all the wood working tools, all the machines for working on the locomotive and steel cars were located in the left hand side of the structure.
The EBT was a complete entity in its own little place.
My structure when complete will have tracks for all the repairs the railroad will need to do! Well at least look like they could.
Shop cars were used to move deck planks for the flat cars and boxes.
By the twenties most of the wood cars had been faded out of service and the car repair shop was used mainly for storage.
Most of the narrow gauge railroads
Had to be self sufficient in all ways! The EBT built all of their steel hopper and box cars along with the steel flats starting around 1913 ! They purchased the first cars then started building their own.
Just a little bit more information to cloud everyone’s minds.
Enjoy
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694




--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Climax@...
 

Why not use either sheet plastic of the right thickness or even sheet metal for the roofs instead of the card stock ones?
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Ric Case
Sent: Nov 12, 2019 8:05 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

I have found that painting both sides of the roof material helps stop the warping! 

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Nov 12, 2019, at 3:09 AM, Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K

Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Ric Case
 

I have found that painting both sides of the roof material helps stop the warping! 

Ric Case 
EBT Modeler 
Hamilton Ohio 
1-513-375-7694

On Nov 12, 2019, at 3:09 AM, Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K

Re: EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

Bruce
 

Ric,

Your photo is inspiring and shows how large the complex is!

Bruce Bowie
Huron Ohio

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 7:55 AM Ric Case <ebtmodeler@...> wrote:



The tracks too the right are for car repair and actual car storage!
The two tracks in the center are for the locomotives repairs.
The car repair shop contained all the wood working tools, all the machines for working on the locomotive and steel cars were located in the left hand side of the structure.
The EBT was a complete entity in its own little place.
My structure when complete will have tracks for all the repairs the railroad will need to do! Well at least look like they could.
Shop cars were used to move deck planks for the flat cars and boxes.
By the twenties most of the wood cars had been faded out of service and the car repair shop was used mainly for storage.
Most of the narrow gauge railroads
Had to be self sufficient in all ways! The EBT built all of their steel hopper and box cars along with the steel flats starting around 1913 ! They purchased the first cars then started building their own.
Just a little bit more information to cloud everyone’s minds.
Enjoy
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694



Re: EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

Mark Lewis
 

Rick:

Great looking modeled complex! 👍

Mark Lewis 
Narrow gauge modeling in N.C.

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 7:55 AM Ric Case <ebtmodeler@...> wrote:



The tracks too the right are for car repair and actual car storage!
The two tracks in the center are for the locomotives repairs.
The car repair shop contained all the wood working tools, all the machines for working on the locomotive and steel cars were located in the left hand side of the structure.
The EBT was a complete entity in its own little place.
My structure when complete will have tracks for all the repairs the railroad will need to do! Well at least look like they could.
Shop cars were used to move deck planks for the flat cars and boxes.
By the twenties most of the wood cars had been faded out of service and the car repair shop was used mainly for storage.
Most of the narrow gauge railroads
Had to be self sufficient in all ways! The EBT built all of their steel hopper and box cars along with the steel flats starting around 1913 ! They purchased the first cars then started building their own.
Just a little bit more information to cloud everyone’s minds.
Enjoy
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694



EBT LOCO SHOP CAR SHOPS REMOVED THE ROOF TO SHOW WHERE THE TRACKS SHOULD BE!

Ric Case
 

The tracks too the right are for car repair and actual car storage!
The two tracks in the center are for the locomotives repairs.
The car repair shop contained all the wood working tools, all the machines for working on the locomotive and steel cars were located in the left hand side of the structure.
The EBT was a complete entity in its own little place.
My structure when complete will have tracks for all the repairs the railroad will need to do! Well at least look like they could.
Shop cars were used to move deck planks for the flat cars and boxes.
By the twenties most of the wood cars had been faded out of service and the car repair shop was used mainly for storage.
Most of the narrow gauge railroads
Had to be self sufficient in all ways! The EBT built all of their steel hopper and box cars along with the steel flats starting around 1913 ! They purchased the first cars then started building their own.
Just a little bit more information to cloud everyone’s minds.
Enjoy
Ric Case
EBT Modeler
Hamilton Ohio
1-513-375-7694

Re: Ad: EBT HOn3 Machine and Car/Carpentry Shop Kit

Bruce
 

Thanks for the insight John.


On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 2:14 AM John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:

Bruce

This track served the carpentry shop, which probably predates the predominance of steel rolling stock. The extra narrow gauge track was probably a tram used to move wood car sills, or bundled smaller material, in and out of the shop.  A 4"x 8"x30' car sill runs about 300lbs, so you can see why they would want to move them on a small rail car.  As to where it went, I would expect to find a wood storage/drying shed near the far end.

As to gauge, what was used in the company's coal mines?

John Stutz

On November 4, 2019 at 12:34 PM Bruce <in2trains@...> wrote:

So the group is aware, I have placed a pre-order.  These guys make great kits and I have to believe this one will add to their reputation.  Can't wait for my "Xmas"  present!  Now I just have to let my bride know I am good to go for the holidays.

PS - I am reading Kyper's newest book.  One picture (copy attached) of the south wall of the car shop shows rails running up to the small door between the west and middle doors.  Does anyone know what gauge the rails were and how far south away from the car shop they ran?  Reviewing the car shop floor plan (copy also attached) they appear narrower than 3'.  Maybe 24"??

Thanks.

With cinders in your eyes,
Bruce Bowie
419-602-3584 cell



On Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 10:50 AM NarrowMinded1 < nathan.kline83@...> wrote:
Hi Ric,

Yes, it will be the complete structure; 2 bay loco shop, boiler shop, machine shop, and 3 bay car shop.
--
Nathan Kline
www.nateslightironhobbies.com
www.broadtopmountainmodels.com

 

 

Re: Running DC on a DCC Layout

Dave Trimble
 

FYI, Atlas did market all three. RS locos.

Dave

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 7:25 AM Dave Trimble <dtrimble@...> wrote:
Just search for RS-1, RS-2, Ottawa RS-3 locomotive. I then Went to Wikipedia.

Dave

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 6:51 AM Russ Norris <rbnorrisjr@...> wrote:
Thanks Dave.  The pix of the RS-2 came through fine but the links to the RS-1 and RS-3 were missing.

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 1:32 AM Dave Trimble <dtrimble@...> wrote:
Here’s pictures of RS-1 


And RS-3:


And, for completeness, RS-2


Supposedly the 2 and 3 were nearly identical and more angular than the 1. 

They built 1418 RS-3, 377 RS-2 and 469 RS-1.

Clearly the RS-3 was the most successful.

You can read about them all and their differences in Wikipedia areticals.

Dave

--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Running DC on a DCC Layout

Dave Trimble
 

Just search for RS-1, RS-2, Ottawa RS-3 locomotive. I then Went to Wikipedia.

Dave

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019 at 6:51 AM Russ Norris <rbnorrisjr@...> wrote:
Thanks Dave.  The pix of the RS-2 came through fine but the links to the RS-1 and RS-3 were missing.

On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 1:32 AM Dave Trimble <dtrimble@...> wrote:
Here’s pictures of RS-1 


And RS-3:


And, for completeness, RS-2


Supposedly the 2 and 3 were nearly identical and more angular than the 1. 

They built 1418 RS-3, 377 RS-2 and 469 RS-1.

Clearly the RS-3 was the most successful.

You can read about them all and their differences in Wikipedia areticals.

Dave

--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Running DC on a DCC Layout

Russ Norris
 

Thanks Dave.  The pix of the RS-2 came through fine but the links to the RS-1 and RS-3 were missing.


On Tue, Nov 12, 2019, 1:32 AM Dave Trimble <dtrimble@...> wrote:
Here’s pictures of RS-1 


And RS-3:


And, for completeness, RS-2


Supposedly the 2 and 3 were nearly identical and more angular than the 1. 

They built 1418 RS-3, 377 RS-2 and 469 RS-1.

Clearly the RS-3 was the most successful.

You can read about them all and their differences in Wikipedia areticals.

Dave


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Jeff Young
 

Thanks for the info, Mark.

I’ve got a Sargents kit (with three extra stalls), but getting through Kokomo, Marshall Pass and the Alpine Tunnel to Sargents is going to take me another 10 years or so.  I hope I still remember your advice by then. ;)

Cheers,
Jeff.


On 12 Nov 2019, at 08:09, Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K

Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Mark Kasprowicz
 

Perhaps buy the extra two or three stalls for the Sargents kit giving you a rarer six stall house and then look around for a more common two or three staller. I just finished a five stall Sargents and can confirm it will take a K-37 but the track has to be centralised accurately. It goes together very well but beware of the roof. It has a tendancy to warp especially with the extra stalls. If I were doing it again I'd contact Bill when ordering the extra stalls (easiest place to get them) and got him to supply another one piece three stall roof. I had to add an extension to the sides of the roof to make it fit so that might be a cure for that. There's a fair amount of timberwork that has to be glued under the roof which is supposed to straighten it, but I gave up after a while when it seemed it wasn't going to happen.
Use spirit based paints when apply the tissue/ tar paper, again to avoid warping.
Mark K

Re: Ad: EBT HOn3 Machine and Car/Carpentry Shop Kit

John Stutz
 

Bruce

This track served the carpentry shop, which probably predates the predominance of steel rolling stock. The extra narrow gauge track was probably a tram used to move wood car sills, or bundled smaller material, in and out of the shop.  A 4"x 8"x30' car sill runs about 300lbs, so you can see why they would want to move them on a small rail car.  As to where it went, I would expect to find a wood storage/drying shed near the far end.

As to gauge, what was used in the company's coal mines?

John Stutz

On November 4, 2019 at 12:34 PM Bruce <in2trains@...> wrote:

So the group is aware, I have placed a pre-order.  These guys make great kits and I have to believe this one will add to their reputation.  Can't wait for my "Xmas"  present!  Now I just have to let my bride know I am good to go for the holidays.

PS - I am reading Kyper's newest book.  One picture (copy attached) of the south wall of the car shop shows rails running up to the small door between the west and middle doors.  Does anyone know what gauge the rails were and how far south away from the car shop they ran?  Reviewing the car shop floor plan (copy also attached) they appear narrower than 3'.  Maybe 24"??

Thanks.

With cinders in your eyes,
Bruce Bowie
419-602-3584 cell



On Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 10:50 AM NarrowMinded1 < nathan.kline83@...> wrote:
Hi Ric,

Yes, it will be the complete structure; 2 bay loco shop, boiler shop, machine shop, and 3 bay car shop.
--
Nathan Kline
www.nateslightironhobbies.com
www.broadtopmountainmodels.com

 

 

Re: Running DC on a DCC Layout

Dave Trimble
 

Here’s pictures of RS-1 


And RS-3:


And, for completeness, RS-2


Supposedly the 2 and 3 were nearly identical and more angular than the 1. 

They built 1418 RS-3, 377 RS-2 and 469 RS-1.

Clearly the RS-3 was the most successful.

You can read about them all and their differences in Wikipedia areticals.

Dave

Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Dale Buxton
 

It’s mostly a width thing with D&RGW “K’s”. However, C&S locomotives with Bear Trap Spark Arrestors have a height problem at Como. That’s why the arrestor was hinged in the middle and they folded down to the side. 

Dale B.

On Mon, Nov 11, 2019 at 20:43 <Climax@...> wrote:

Is that becasue of height or width problems.  I have most of the MM roundhouses and extra stalls yet to build.
-----Original Message-----
From: Dale Buxton
Sent: Nov 11, 2019 10:30 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Know this about the MM Como roundhouse. The door openings will not accommodate K-27s easily and none of the larger “K” classes at all.

Monster Model Works did a short run of the Durango Roundhouse in HO scale if you can find one. It will take all of the “K” classes.

Dale B

Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Climax@...
 


Is that becasue of height or width problems.  I have most of the MM roundhouses and extra stalls yet to build.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dale Buxton
Sent: Nov 11, 2019 10:30 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Know this about the MM Como roundhouse. The door openings will not accommodate K-27s easily and none of the larger “K” classes at all.

Monster Model Works did a short run of the Durango Roundhouse in HO scale if you can find one. It will take all of the “K” classes.

Dale B

Re: Narrow Gauge Roundhouses

Dale Buxton
 

Know this about the MM Como roundhouse. The door openings will not accommodate K-27s easily and none of the larger “K” classes at all.

Monster Model Works did a short run of the Durango Roundhouse in HO scale if you can find one. It will take all of the “K” classes.

Dale B

Re: Running DC on a DCC Layout

Russ Norris
 

And very appropriate for 1950, the era I model!  To be honest, I just like the look of them -- very early steam to diesel transition.  I understand they used to smoke like a steam engine


On Mon, Nov 11, 2019, 7:53 PM Steve Hatch <hatch@...> wrote:
Yes they are RS-1's  The hood on the cab and the square corners
-Steve Hatch


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Running DC on a DCC Layout

Steve Hatch
 

Yes they are RS-1's  The hood on the cab and the square corners
-Steve Hatch