Date   
FS: Blackstone #40 c-19 new in box

lloyd lehrer
 

$350 plus shipping. PayPal friends.

lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097

--
lloyd lehrer

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

John G Massura
 


On Aug 20, 2019, at 12:09, hiroechan <hiroechan@...> wrote:

I was starting to do a similar thing with the switches mounted in the fascia on my HO modules, but learned from a single incident that it's a really bad idea to have public-facing switch controls when set up at public shows. Someone's unsupervised 10-year-old ran up to the layout and started flipping switches, and a custom painted GG1 with 13 mixed Penn Central coaches all took a nosedive off the layout onto the floor at speed because of that child. 

 

Since then, I've deliberately hidden all the track switch controls on the underside of the fascia where they can't be easily seen. Their placement is marked on the fascia with a small handpainted number that corresponds to the DCC address of the specific track switch. This keeps them accessible for operators, but cuts way down on the attractive nuisance chaos factor of uncontrolled children. 

 
I’ve solved the little hands problem by installing a phono socket for each machine in a fascia; each engineer had a shorting phono plug, inserts in the socket to throw the turnout, and moves on.

John Massura

--Drew McCann


Re: Tortoise Power Supply

hiroechan
 

I was starting to do a similar thing with the switches mounted in the fascia on my HO modules, but learned from a single incident that it's a really bad idea to have public-facing switch controls when set up at public shows. Someone's unsupervised 10-year-old ran up to the layout and started flipping switches, and a custom painted GG1 with 13 mixed Penn Central coaches all took a nosedive off the layout onto the floor at speed because of that child. 

 

Since then, I've deliberately hidden all the track switch controls on the underside of the fascia where they can't be easily seen. Their placement is marked on the fascia with a small handpainted number that corresponds to the DCC address of the specific track switch. This keeps them accessible for operators, but cuts way down on the attractive nuisance chaos factor of uncontrolled children. 

 

--Drew McCann

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Russ Norris
 

You may be right, Bill.  The Touch Toggles work out to about $10 per toggle.  So a set of 4 toggles with the control unit is $40, a set of 8 are $80, etc.  For a relatively small layout like mine, this is an acceptable solution.  Plus I have been upgrading sections of the layout a little at a time.  I am ready to start the ladder track in the dual gauge yard,  which will involve 8 machines.

Russ

On Tue, Aug 20, 2019, 11:07 AM Bill Lugg <luggw1@...> wrote:
I've looked at the Berrett Hill solution, but it seems like the price is
rather high.  Do you have to buy their other switching gear to go with
the switches themselves?  If so, I'd have to invest about $500 to $600
to outfit my layout with their products.

Dave, if I understand your solution correctly, you're referring to the
copper cap you can slip on the end of a pipe, right?  That's a
brilliantly simple solution.  Do you use LED indicators as well or just
the labels to indicate turnout position?  I've been making aluminum
plates that accommodate a miniature SPDT switch and two LEDs that I will
attach to my fascia when I install it, but the problem is it's not
flush.  You're solution addresses that problem.

Bill Lugg


On 8/20/19 8:28 AM, Russ Norris wrote:
> Actually, the new touch toggles are built very much the same way --
> you stick your finger in a plastic cup that is mounted in and flush
> with the fascia.  For walk along operation, when the switch and toggle
> are in line with each other, it's a great combination.  For something
> like a yard, with switches all over the place, the panel mount makes
> more sense to me.
>
> Russ
>
> On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 9:20 AM <Climax@...
> <mailto:Climax@...>> wrote:
>
>     Before I switched over to DCC control of my switches I used
>     miniature toggle switches to control my tortoises switch
>     machines.  I got some 3/4 inch copper nipples that are used to end
>     a pipe in plumbing.  I drilled the bottoms with a hole big enough
>     to put the threaded end of the switch through and cleaned them
>     up.  I then mounted the toggle switch on the inside of the cup so
>     that the wired end stuck out the top.  I added wires and after
>     drilling into the facial with a drill that was exactly the size of
>     the outside diameter of the cup, I pressed them in.  The switches
>     did not stick out to get thrown or hit by accident.  I just glued
>     them in place with white glue. The back side wires were easy to
>     attach to as only two power wires were attached and two to each
>     machine.  I just put labels on the facial above each switch and I
>     was in business. Quick, easy, and foolproof.  All you did was
>     stick your finger it the hold and throw the toggle and the magic
>     happened
>
>     Dave.
>
>         -----Original Message-----
>         From: Russ Norris
>         Sent: Aug 20, 2019 6:19 AM
>         To: HOn3@groups.io <mailto:HOn3@groups.io>
>         Subject: Re: [HOn3] Tortoise Power Supply
>
>         Give the touch toggles a look, Brian.  They are made by a
>         company called Berrit Hill (sp?) and the company has recently
>         come out with some new products including controls that can be
>         easily mounted directly in the fascia so you don't have
>         anything projecting into the aisle.  The owner of the company
>         is very helpful about how to install them.  They run about
>         $10 per switch.  They also can provide a wall wart type power
>         source for those who don't have a box of old ones like I do.
>
>         Russ
>
>         On Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 11:32 PM Brian Jansky
>         <brianj844@... <mailto:brianj844@...>> wrote:
>
>             Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am
>             looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I
>             hadn't given the method you described much though but I
>             realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring
>             involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v -
>             12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair
>             of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in
>             option 2 here
>             <http://www.circuitron.com/index_files/INS/800-6000ins.pdf>?
>             Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's
>             do you recommend?
>
>             Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I
>             will also look into those further.
>
>             Thanks,
>             Brian
>
>
>         --
>         Russ Norris, MMR
>         Cape Cod, Massachusetts
>         http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/
>
>
> --
> Russ Norris, MMR
> Cape Cod, Massachusetts
> http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/
>




--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Climax@...
 

Bill, I used the up position as the straight through the switch and down as the turnout from mainline. It worked for me. I just used a spair MRC transformer dedicated to the switch machines for power. I used a VOM to crank the power up to match the ohms drawn from all the switch machines and to have a feed. Seemed to work right. The old DC MRC transformers are a dime a dozen now days and most of us have at least one sitting around.
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Lugg <@luggw1>
Sent: Aug 20, 2019 11:02 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Tortoise Power Supply

I've looked at the Berrett Hill solution, but it seems like the price is
rather high.  Do you have to buy their other switching gear to go with
the switches themselves?  If so, I'd have to invest about $500 to $600
to outfit my layout with their products.

Dave, if I understand your solution correctly, you're referring to the
copper cap you can slip on the end of a pipe, right?  That's a
brilliantly simple solution.  Do you use LED indicators as well or just
the labels to indicate turnout position?  I've been making aluminum
plates that accommodate a miniature SPDT switch and two LEDs that I will
attach to my fascia when I install it, but the problem is it's not
flush.  You're solution addresses that problem.

Bill Lugg


On 8/20/19 8:28 AM, Russ Norris wrote:
Actually, the new touch toggles are built very much the same way --
you stick your finger in a plastic cup that is mounted in and flush
with the fascia.  For walk along operation, when the switch and toggle
are in line with each other, it's a great combination.  For something
like a yard, with switches all over the place, the panel mount makes
more sense to me.

Russ

On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 9:20 AM <Climax@...
<mailto:Climax@...>> wrote:

Before I switched over to DCC control of my switches I used
miniature toggle switches to control my tortoises switch
machines.  I got some 3/4 inch copper nipples that are used to end
a pipe in plumbing.  I drilled the bottoms with a hole big enough
to put the threaded end of the switch through and cleaned them
up.  I then mounted the toggle switch on the inside of the cup so
that the wired end stuck out the top.  I added wires and after
drilling into the facial with a drill that was exactly the size of
the outside diameter of the cup, I pressed them in.  The switches
did not stick out to get thrown or hit by accident.  I just glued
them in place with white glue. The back side wires were easy to
attach to as only two power wires were attached and two to each
machine.  I just put labels on the facial above each switch and I
was in business. Quick, easy, and foolproof.  All you did was
stick your finger it the hold and throw the toggle and the magic
happened

Dave.

-----Original Message-----
From: Russ Norris
Sent: Aug 20, 2019 6:19 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <mailto:HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Tortoise Power Supply

Give the touch toggles a look, Brian.  They are made by a
company called Berrit Hill (sp?) and the company has recently
come out with some new products including controls that can be
easily mounted directly in the fascia so you don't have
anything projecting into the aisle.  The owner of the company
is very helpful about how to install them.  They run about
$10 per switch.  They also can provide a wall wart type power
source for those who don't have a box of old ones like I do.

Russ

On Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 11:32 PM Brian Jansky
<brianj844@... <mailto:brianj844@...>> wrote:

Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am
looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I
hadn't given the method you described much though but I
realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring
involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v -
12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair
of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in
option 2 here
<http://www.circuitron.com/index_files/INS/800-6000ins.pdf>?
Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's
do you recommend?

Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I
will also look into those further.

Thanks,
Brian


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Mike Conder
 

I did the same thing but used 1-1/4" PVC pipe caps.  They fit perfectly into a 2" dia hole, a bit more finger room than the 3/4" copper caps.

BTW, link to the Touch Toggles:


Mike Conder 


On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 7:20 AM <Climax@...> wrote:
Before I switched over to DCC control of my switches I used miniature toggle switches to control my tortoises switch machines.  I got some 3/4 inch copper nipples that are used to end a pipe in plumbing.  I drilled the bottoms with a hole big enough to put the threaded end of the switch through and cleaned them up.  I then mounted the toggle switch on the inside of the cup so that the wired end stuck out the top.  I added wires and after drilling into the facial with a drill that was exactly the size of the outside diameter of the cup, I pressed them in.  The switches did not stick out to get thrown or hit by accident.  I just glued them in place with white glue.  The back side wires were easy to attach to as only two power wires were attached and two to each machine.  I just put labels on the facial above each switch and I was in business. Quick, easy, and foolproof.  All you did was stick your finger it the hold and throw the toggle and the magic happened

Dave.

-----Original Message-----
From: Russ Norris
Sent: Aug 20, 2019 6:19 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Tortoise Power Supply

Give the touch toggles a look, Brian.  They are made by a company called Berrit Hill (sp?) and the company has recently come out with some new products including controls that can be easily mounted directly in the fascia so you don't have anything projecting into the aisle.  The owner of the company is very helpful about how to install them.  They run about $10 per switch.  They also can provide a wall wart type power source for those who don't have a box of old ones like I do.

Russ

On Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 11:32 PM Brian Jansky <brianj844@...> wrote:
Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I hadn't given the method you described much though but I realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v - 12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in option 2 here? Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's do you recommend?

Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I will also look into those further.

Thanks,
Brian


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Bill Lugg
 

I've looked at the Berrett Hill solution, but it seems like the price is rather high.  Do you have to buy their other switching gear to go with the switches themselves?  If so, I'd have to invest about $500 to $600 to outfit my layout with their products.

Dave, if I understand your solution correctly, you're referring to the copper cap you can slip on the end of a pipe, right?  That's a brilliantly simple solution.  Do you use LED indicators as well or just the labels to indicate turnout position?  I've been making aluminum plates that accommodate a miniature SPDT switch and two LEDs that I will attach to my fascia when I install it, but the problem is it's not flush.  You're solution addresses that problem.

Bill Lugg

On 8/20/19 8:28 AM, Russ Norris wrote:
Actually, the new touch toggles are built very much the same way --
you stick your finger in a plastic cup that is mounted in and flush with the fascia.  For walk along operation, when the switch and toggle are in line with each other, it's a great combination.  For something like a yard, with switches all over the place, the panel mount makes more sense to me.

Russ

On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 9:20 AM <Climax@... <mailto:Climax@...>> wrote:

Before I switched over to DCC control of my switches I used
miniature toggle switches to control my tortoises switch
machines.  I got some 3/4 inch copper nipples that are used to end
a pipe in plumbing.  I drilled the bottoms with a hole big enough
to put the threaded end of the switch through and cleaned them
up.  I then mounted the toggle switch on the inside of the cup so
that the wired end stuck out the top.  I added wires and after
drilling into the facial with a drill that was exactly the size of
the outside diameter of the cup, I pressed them in.  The switches
did not stick out to get thrown or hit by accident.  I just glued
them in place with white glue. The back side wires were easy to
attach to as only two power wires were attached and two to each
machine.  I just put labels on the facial above each switch and I
was in business. Quick, easy, and foolproof.  All you did was
stick your finger it the hold and throw the toggle and the magic
happened

Dave.

-----Original Message-----
From: Russ Norris
Sent: Aug 20, 2019 6:19 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <mailto:HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Tortoise Power Supply

Give the touch toggles a look, Brian.  They are made by a
company called Berrit Hill (sp?) and the company has recently
come out with some new products including controls that can be
easily mounted directly in the fascia so you don't have
anything projecting into the aisle.  The owner of the company
is very helpful about how to install them.  They run about
$10 per switch.  They also can provide a wall wart type power
source for those who don't have a box of old ones like I do.

Russ

On Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 11:32 PM Brian Jansky
<brianj844@... <mailto:brianj844@...>> wrote:

Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am
looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I
hadn't given the method you described much though but I
realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring
involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v -
12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair
of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in
option 2 here
<http://www.circuitron.com/index_files/INS/800-6000ins.pdf>?
Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's
do you recommend?

Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I
will also look into those further.

Thanks,
Brian

--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Russ Norris
 

Actually, the new touch toggles are built very much the same way -- you stick your finger in a plastic cup that is mounted in and flush with the fascia.  For walk along operation, when the switch and toggle are in line with each other, it's a great combination.  For something like a yard, with switches all over the place, the panel mount makes more sense to me.  

Russ

On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 9:20 AM <Climax@...> wrote:
Before I switched over to DCC control of my switches I used miniature toggle switches to control my tortoises switch machines.  I got some 3/4 inch copper nipples that are used to end a pipe in plumbing.  I drilled the bottoms with a hole big enough to put the threaded end of the switch through and cleaned them up.  I then mounted the toggle switch on the inside of the cup so that the wired end stuck out the top.  I added wires and after drilling into the facial with a drill that was exactly the size of the outside diameter of the cup, I pressed them in.  The switches did not stick out to get thrown or hit by accident.  I just glued them in place with white glue.  The back side wires were easy to attach to as only two power wires were attached and two to each machine.  I just put labels on the facial above each switch and I was in business. Quick, easy, and foolproof.  All you did was stick your finger it the hold and throw the toggle and the magic happened

Dave.

-----Original Message-----
From: Russ Norris
Sent: Aug 20, 2019 6:19 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Tortoise Power Supply

Give the touch toggles a look, Brian.  They are made by a company called Berrit Hill (sp?) and the company has recently come out with some new products including controls that can be easily mounted directly in the fascia so you don't have anything projecting into the aisle.  The owner of the company is very helpful about how to install them.  They run about $10 per switch.  They also can provide a wall wart type power source for those who don't have a box of old ones like I do.

Russ

On Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 11:32 PM Brian Jansky <brianj844@...> wrote:
Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I hadn't given the method you described much though but I realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v - 12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in option 2 here? Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's do you recommend?

Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I will also look into those further.

Thanks,
Brian


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Climax@...
 

Before I switched over to DCC control of my switches I used miniature toggle switches to control my tortoises switch machines.  I got some 3/4 inch copper nipples that are used to end a pipe in plumbing.  I drilled the bottoms with a hole big enough to put the threaded end of the switch through and cleaned them up.  I then mounted the toggle switch on the inside of the cup so that the wired end stuck out the top.  I added wires and after drilling into the facial with a drill that was exactly the size of the outside diameter of the cup, I pressed them in.  The switches did not stick out to get thrown or hit by accident.  I just glued them in place with white glue.  The back side wires were easy to attach to as only two power wires were attached and two to each machine.  I just put labels on the facial above each switch and I was in business. Quick, easy, and foolproof.  All you did was stick your finger it the hold and throw the toggle and the magic happened

Dave.

-----Original Message-----
From: Russ Norris
Sent: Aug 20, 2019 6:19 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Tortoise Power Supply

Give the touch toggles a look, Brian.  They are made by a company called Berrit Hill (sp?) and the company has recently come out with some new products including controls that can be easily mounted directly in the fascia so you don't have anything projecting into the aisle.  The owner of the company is very helpful about how to install them.  They run about $10 per switch.  They also can provide a wall wart type power source for those who don't have a box of old ones like I do.

Russ

On Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 11:32 PM Brian Jansky <brianj844@...> wrote:
Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I hadn't given the method you described much though but I realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v - 12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in option 2 here? Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's do you recommend?

Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I will also look into those further.

Thanks,
Brian


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

asandrini
 

I was going to use them, but could not figure out a way to install them on the fascia at the turnout locations. I may have a few within a foot, but most are 2-3 feet apart.  With wslkalong radio throttles, the toggles are located on the fascia in front of the turnouts. 

Al



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Russ Norris <rbnorrisjr@...>
Date: 8/20/19 3:19 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Tortoise Power Supply

Give the touch toggles a look, Brian.  They are made by a company called Berrit Hill (sp?) and the company has recently come out with some new products including controls that can be easily mounted directly in the fascia so you don't have anything projecting into the aisle.  The owner of the company is very helpful about how to install them.  They run about $10 per switch.  They also can provide a wall wart type power source for those who don't have a box of old ones like I do.

Russ

On Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 11:32 PM Brian Jansky <brianj844@...> wrote:
Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I hadn't given the method you described much though but I realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v - 12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in option 2 here? Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's do you recommend?

Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I will also look into those further.

Thanks,
Brian


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Mark Lewis
 

Brian and Russ:

I have used the Beritt(?) Touch Toggles while operating on John Shorts large HOn3 RGS layout and can say that they work great, making turnout control a snap (no pun intended!)

Mark Lewis 
narrow gauge modeling in N.C.

On Tue, Aug 20, 2019, 6:20 AM Russ Norris <rbnorrisjr@...> wrote:
Give the touch toggles a look, Brian.  They are made by a company called Berrit Hill (sp?) and the company has recently come out with some new products including controls that can be easily mounted directly in the fascia so you don't have anything projecting into the aisle.  The owner of the company is very helpful about how to install them.  They run about $10 per switch.  They also can provide a wall wart type power source for those who don't have a box of old ones like I do.

Russ

On Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 11:32 PM Brian Jansky <brianj844@...> wrote:
Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I hadn't given the method you described much though but I realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v - 12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in option 2 here? Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's do you recommend?

Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I will also look into those further.

Thanks,
Brian


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Russ Norris
 

Give the touch toggles a look, Brian.  They are made by a company called Berrit Hill (sp?) and the company has recently come out with some new products including controls that can be easily mounted directly in the fascia so you don't have anything projecting into the aisle.  The owner of the company is very helpful about how to install them.  They run about $10 per switch.  They also can provide a wall wart type power source for those who don't have a box of old ones like I do.

Russ

On Mon, Aug 19, 2019, 11:32 PM Brian Jansky <brianj844@...> wrote:
Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I hadn't given the method you described much though but I realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v - 12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in option 2 here? Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's do you recommend?

Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I will also look into those further.

Thanks,
Brian


--
Russ Norris, MMR
Cape Cod, Massachusetts
http://blacklogvalleyrailroad.blogspot.com/

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Mark Kasprowicz
 

Brian,

Yes, diagram 2) shows a pair of wall warts used to feed the diode circuit in 4). Note that these are DC wall warts so no diodes are needed. you just have to connect the 12v output of one to the 0 volt output of the other and that will automatically give you the 12v - 0v - minus 12v you need.

Mark K

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Mark Kasprowicz
 

Nothing, but nothing beats good Italian saugage. I didn't know you could freeze it though.
We had a German sausage shop nearby once. It was called
'The Wurst Shop in Town'.

Mark

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Climax@...
 

I am using nce DCC and use two boosters.  One booster is for the HO 7 HOn3 track and the other is dedicated to the 37 Tortoise SM.  So far it has worked out perfectly.
DMB

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Jansky
Sent: Aug 19, 2019 11:32 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Tortoise Power Supply

Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I hadn't given the method you described much though but I realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v - 12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in option 2 here? Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's do you recommend?

Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I will also look into those further.

Thanks,
Brian

Re: Tortoise Power Supply

Brian Jansky
 

Very timely thread! I am reaching the point where I am looking at how to do this on my shelf layout. Mark, I hadn't given the method you described much though but I realize it appears to be a nice way to simplify the wiring involved. Any tips on where to find a one amp 12v - 0v - 12v transformer though? I assume, I could also use a pair of identical wall warts with the same setup as shown in option 2 here? Also, do all three lines get a diode? Finally, what LED's do you recommend?

Also, Russ, those touch toggles do look really neat! I will also look into those further.

Thanks,
Brian

Re: NWSL lives!

wayne_h_sanderson
 

Fantastic news! I knew it was too good to die off like that...

NWSL lives!

Mike Conder
 

Pardon the multiple postings, but the good news need to be storage fat and wide ...


NorthWest Short Line Press Release
For Immediate Release (August 19, 2019


NorthWest Short Line is pleased to announce that the entire line has been acquired by an NWSL employee, effective September 3rd, 2019. All existing back orders will be filled, and NWSL will be open to new orders as soon as the new websites are rolled out; the primary website nwsl.com will carry forward as the primary contact point. The line is expected to carry forward largely unchanged although the company will no longer offer phone support. NWSL will be headquartered in Kila, Montana, located near Kalispell, and the new address is PO Box 219, Kila, MT 59920. Email contact is through the website. 

NorthWest Short LinePO Box 1349
Hamilton, MT 59840 USA

fax (406)-375-7559


Mike Conder








WANTED: Hobby Gallery HO Scale Pump House Kit

bassb04011
 

Please contact me if you have one to sell.
Thanks,
Brian Bass

Re: NWSL purchased

Mike Van Hove
 

Hey!
That’s great news.

I’m sorry for the guy has been running NWSL.

I’m sure loosing his wife has been a traumatic event, and I/we all wish him well.

Mike Van Hove

On Aug 19, 2019, at 3:30 PM, hiroechan <hiroechan@...> wrote:

Gents, word on the street is that someone bought NWSL.

 

"Dave here, and I have good news. NWSL released the following today:

========
NorthWest Short Line Press Release
For Immediate Release

NorthWest Short Line is pleased to announce that the entire line has been acquired by an NWSL employee, effective September 3rd, 2019. All existing back orders will be filled, and NWSL will be open to new orders as soon as the new websites are rolled out; the primary website nwsl.com will carry forward as the primary contact point. The line is expected to carry forward largely unchanged although the company will no longer offer phone support. NWSL will be headquartered in Kila, Montana, located near Kalispell, and the new address is PO Box 219, Kila, MT 59920. Email contact is through the website."