Date   
Model building philosophy

Lee Gustafson
 

Dave, Nathan & All,

Dave like you I approach model building as a model within a model until the project is complete. Yes, I want to finish the model but I've learned to enjoy each step and what it represents. Sometimes ( more often than I care to admit ) I've had to do a step over to accomplish the sub-assembly to my level of satisfaction. In the process I've learned something or acquired a new skill. Model building is problem solving and skill application. At the end of a model building session even if it didn't go well I try to leave it at a place that I want to come back to the next day or model building session. When the model is finished it may not be perfect ( it isn't, I know where the flaws are ) but I enjoy the completed model and look forward to the next project. I've been building model for 60 plus years so that may have helped me reach this perspective. My current project is the Coeur d'Alene mine that I've been working on for a year. Yes, I've worked on other short term projects but this has been like a good book I'm really enjoying the build. Thanks for reading and please share your thoughts on model building and a project you're working on.

Lee Gustafson




-----Original Message-----
From: Climax <Climax@...>
To: HOn3 <HOn3@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Apr 17, 2019 11:50 am
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Blackstone future- US production

I have approached even my biggest projects by looking at each step in assembly and completing it then go to the next one.  I don't care if its a Fine Scale Miniatures kit, SSL kit or even a Jordan kit.  Just take it slow and methotical.  There is no race to get things done, this is a hobby and we should enjoy each step.  I just completed a 20 tub pickle tub complex and I did it one pickle at a time.

Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: NarrowMinded1
Sent: Apr 17, 2019 12:10 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Blackstone future- US production

Hi Lee,

Thanks for the reply and tips! I've always had high expectations and been really critical of my work when it comes to model trains; guess I'll have to try and change that :-/ You take care as well!

"Nathan,


I appreciate how your health ( I had a detached retina ) can impact your model building ability, skill, desires and lead to frustration. Yes, Blackstone products provide a path to HOn3 that did not exist before they entered the market place. Model building can be good therapy if it's approached with simple projects and modest expectations. Scenery, pre-fab easy to build structures and completing small scenes can be satisfying if the project is small and taken at a modest pace. Model building should be enjoyable. Try not to be too hard on yourself and take pleasure in the simple projects. Take care and best wishes.

Lee Gustafson"

--
Nathan Kline
Tiadaghton Valley Railroad & Coal Co.
McConnellsburg, PA
--------------------------------------------------
Web: https://www.tiadaghtonvalleyrr.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TiadaghtonValleyRailroad/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVJMoICFWw9Muse6xm8moiQ

Re: Model building philosophy

Russ Norris
 

Thanks for sharing your modeling philosophy, Lee.  It got me thinking about all the levels of building models within models.  As a prototype modeler (EBT) , my ultimate goal is to reproduce portions of the prototype in as much detail as I am capable of.  But this is a long term project,  I've been working on my fifth model railroad for more than ten years.  Parts of it are about as complete as they're going to be -- I estimate I am about 75% there.  Within that overall modeling project, there are smaller and smaller models -- building the dual gauge yard, the coal cleaning plant, a brickyard, Orbisonia station, thje EBT roundhouse, turntable and shops, Robertsdale.  Each of these smaller parts of the whole has taken several years to complete, and each is composed of a number of smaller projects, sort of like those Russian dolls inside of dolls inside of dolls.  For example, I needed to cover a pop-up that allows me access to trackage I can't reach from the aisle.  The answer was to build a small model of the town of Mount Union on a section of extruded foam that would fit neatly into the existing scenery and look like it belonged there.  Building that module took more than a year, and it was a really fun project.  But each of the various structures and sub-assemblies was fun too.  I think that what makes model railroading so interesting to me is that complexity.  You are always working on something that is a part of something that in turn is a part of something greater and on ad infinitum.  Before starting a new area of the railroad, I enjoy thinking about it for a while -- what do I need to include, how will I integrate it into the existing model without tearing everything up.  Eventually I have a pretty clear picture in my mind of where it's going to go, how it will fit in with what's around it, what models will I have to kit or scratch build for it, etc.   The end result is something akin to a work of art -- there are so many elements that make up the whole.  At 77 I don't know if I will ever finish the overall model, but it doesn't matter.  It's a long term goal to work toward, and the fun is more in the journey than the destination.

Russ Norris

On Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 8:16 PM Lee Gustafson via Groups.Io <bagustaf=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dave, Nathan & All,

Dave like you I approach model building as a model within a model until the project is complete. Yes, I want to finish the model but I've learned to enjoy each step and what it represents. Sometimes ( more often than I care to admit ) I've had to do a step over to accomplish the sub-assembly to my level of satisfaction. In the process I've learned something or acquired a new skill. Model building is problem solving and skill application. At the end of a model building session even if it didn't go well I try to leave it at a place that I want to come back to the next day or model building session. When the model is finished it may not be perfect ( it isn't, I know where the flaws are ) but I enjoy the completed model and look forward to the next project. I've been building model for 60 plus years so that may have helped me reach this perspective. My current project is the Coeur d'Alene mine that I've been working on for a year. Yes, I've worked on other short term projects but this has been like a good book I'm really enjoying the build. Thanks for reading and please share your thoughts on model building and a project you're working on.

Lee Gustafson




-----Original Message-----
From: Climax <Climax@...>
To: HOn3 <HOn3@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Apr 17, 2019 11:50 am
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Blackstone future- US production

I have approached even my biggest projects by looking at each step in assembly and completing it then go to the next one.  I don't care if its a Fine Scale Miniatures kit, SSL kit or even a Jordan kit.  Just take it slow and methotical.  There is no race to get things done, this is a hobby and we should enjoy each step.  I just completed a 20 tub pickle tub complex and I did it one pickle at a time.

Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: NarrowMinded1
Sent: Apr 17, 2019 12:10 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Blackstone future- US production

Hi Lee,

Thanks for the reply and tips! I've always had high expectations and been really critical of my work when it comes to model trains; guess I'll have to try and change that :-/ You take care as well!

"Nathan,


I appreciate how your health ( I had a detached retina ) can impact your model building ability, skill, desires and lead to frustration. Yes, Blackstone products provide a path to HOn3 that did not exist before they entered the market place. Model building can be good therapy if it's approached with simple projects and modest expectations. Scenery, pre-fab easy to build structures and completing small scenes can be satisfying if the project is small and taken at a modest pace. Model building should be enjoyable. Try not to be too hard on yourself and take pleasure in the simple projects. Take care and best wishes.

Lee Gustafson"

--
Nathan Kline
Tiadaghton Valley Railroad & Coal Co.
McConnellsburg, PA
--------------------------------------------------
Web: https://www.tiadaghtonvalleyrr.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TiadaghtonValleyRailroad/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVJMoICFWw9Muse6xm8moiQ

Re: Model building philosophy

Climax@...
 

Lee and others:
I know this may make a few cringe as it's not pure HOn3, but I do both.  Over the last 60+ years I have built and acquired over 500 cars.  I have built all of the Ambroid 1 of 5000 Series 1 adn 2, Heritage Line, and their regular issues.  I have built probably 90% of the Labelle cars, HO & HOn3, almost all the Mainline mondels, many Quality Craft, Red Ball, and all the Central Valley cars, Scratch built many and a lot of odd balls.  In fact I have a Redball Rotory Snow Plow kit coming my way....never saw one  of them before.  I had more than hundred Central Valley Box, Reefer, and Ventilated Reefer cars.  Over the years their drab paints and details started to take a real hit.  So I started repairing and repainting them.  I used Cover House Dry Transfers on them and now they pop out.  During this refinish I made 3 or 4 orders for more Clover House dry transfers and ordered all the Heinz Transfers.  They go on easy and are much sharper with no decal film after final finish.  Back to the Heinz cars, after dooing a dozen and running out I had a bug.  So I built a Heinz Vinegar Tank car out of an O Scale article where the tank is built around a piece of PVC tube wrapped in wood.  At first i forgot to half the sizes and the PVC sure looked too big for HO!.  After making the adjustments I built the car and it looks great.  Now the lettering had to be perfect and there is nothing commercially available.  I down loaded several logos of the Heinz "57" log until I had the right size, then carefully cut it out.  I placed it on my yellow painted tank and held it in place while I pushed very tiny holes along the logo edges.  I hand painted the logo and used commercial DT's on the rest.  Looks great.  Well now what I said.  I had heard or had seen a picture of a large pickle on a flat someplace and used a Christmas Tree "foam" pickle for a flat car load.  I built a frame for it to sit in, put the Pickle in and wala had it done.  I took it to a SSR  meet and showed it to a couple of friends.  One stood up and took me to a table where a guy was selling some books he has written.  One was Pickle and Vinegar Makes of the MIdwest by David J. Leider.  There on the cover was a picture of my Flat car with a pickle on it!  After reading most of the book I though with all this I need a pickle salting station.  I chose one out of an old RMC article that looks very similar to the American Model Builders Pickle Salting Station.  My first challenge was to build the 8000# tanks.  I looked around for some of the old Athearn Pickle tank car tanks and in fact got one on eBay.  I am impatient so I took some scribbed wood and tried wrapping it around a piece of 1/2" dowel.  It immediately broke.  I didn't want to put water on it as that warps the wood.  I selected alcohol and just brushed it on to saturate the wood.  Now it wrapped around a 1/2" piece of PVC easily and I held it in place with rubber bands until it dried.  It took the curve perfectly.  I removed it and glued it the 1/2" dowel and it fit like a glove.  I little trimming and it was perfect.  I then stained and streaked it with typical tank darkenings in wood from wet spots.  After it dried I painted the inside of the tank with light green Floquil paint.  After that dired I got some spice seeds and glued them on the light green paint.  After it dried they looked to big even though  had cut them a in hallf.  So off to the grocery store I went to look at spices.  I found Rosemary a better size.  Back home, smeared white glue each tub and poured on Rosmary seeds, pushed them into the glue and poured the excess into the next tank on kept that up for 40 tanks!  Yes, 40 of them!  I was building two Salting Stations at the same time, one for my buddy in Soddy Daisy TN and one for me.  I only did 14 tanks which were open where you could see the floating pickles.  After the glue dried I painted them again and put a dab of Woodland Scenics water in each tub and smeared it around.  After that died I again painted it a light green.  After that dried I dry brushed a dark green on the pickles that were sticking out of the water.  Once that dried I sprayed Testors gloss over the tub content to make them shine like wet pickles.  I then purchased 6 bags of 1 x 3 inch HO Scale Evergreen Hill Styrene strips and glued them around the tanks, 6 to a tank.  After that dried I painted them all silver with a felt tip pen and then dry brushed a white gray mixture in streaks down the tanks to resemble salt seeping through the tank sides.  Strip wood was used for making the tank tops.  My buddy thought I had gone nuts making 40 perfect water tanks, but I assured them it was a better project.  The decks were all individual boards cut as was almost all the rest of the structure.  I plan on soaking the base in pickle juice right before I take it in to the contest room.  I remember a friend who hung a small bucket of BS under his table with a tiny light bulb under it to warm it up   Every once in a while he would add some water to refresh it and only turned it on under the cattle yards when visitors were present.  We use sound, lights, and motion, why not smells too?  Now stepping in the BS would be just a little too much wouldn't you think?
Moral of the story, let your mind wander, follow your curiosity,and enjoy the ride and laugh a lot.
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: "Lee Gustafson via Groups.Io"
Sent: Apr 17, 2019 8:16 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] Model building philosophy

Dave, Nathan & All,

Dave like you I approach model building as a model within a model until the project is complete. Yes, I want to finish the model but I've learned to enjoy each step and what it represents. Sometimes ( more often than I care to admit ) I've had to do a step over to accomplish the sub-assembly to my level of satisfaction. In the process I've learned something or acquired a new skill. Model building is problem solving and skill application. At the end of a model building session even if it didn't go well I try to leave it at a place that I want to come back to the next day or model building session. When the model is finished it may not be perfect ( it isn't, I know where the flaws are ) but I enjoy the completed model and look forward to the next project. I've been building model for 60 plus years so that may have helped me reach this perspective. My current project is the Coeur d'Alene mine that I've been working on for a year. Yes, I've worked on other short term projects but this has been like a good book I'm really enjoying the build. Thanks for reading and please share your thoughts on model building and a project you're working on.

Lee Gustafson




-----Original Message-----
From: Climax <Climax@...>
To: HOn3 <HOn3@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Apr 17, 2019 11:50 am
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Blackstone future- US production

I have approached even my biggest projects by looking at each step in assembly and completing it then go to the next one.  I don't care if its a Fine Scale Miniatures kit, SSL kit or even a Jordan kit.  Just take it slow and methotical.  There is no race to get things done, this is a hobby and we should enjoy each step.  I just completed a 20 tub pickle tub complex and I did it one pickle at a time.

Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: NarrowMinded1
Sent: Apr 17, 2019 12:10 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Blackstone future- US production

Hi Lee,

Thanks for the reply and tips! I've always had high expectations and been really critical of my work when it comes to model trains; guess I'll have to try and change that :-/ You take care as well!

"Nathan,


I appreciate how your health ( I had a detached retina ) can impact your model building ability, skill, desires and lead to frustration. Yes, Blackstone products provide a path to HOn3 that did not exist before they entered the market place. Model building can be good therapy if it's approached with simple projects and modest expectations. Scenery, pre-fab easy to build structures and completing small scenes can be satisfying if the project is small and taken at a modest pace. Model building should be enjoyable. Try not to be too hard on yourself and take pleasure in the simple projects. Take care and best wishes.

Lee Gustafson"

--
Nathan Kline
Tiadaghton Valley Railroad & Coal Co.
McConnellsburg, PA
--------------------------------------------------
Web: https://www.tiadaghtonvalleyrr.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TiadaghtonValleyRailroad/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVJMoICFWw9Muse6xm8moiQ

Re: Blackstone future- US production

 

Dave - Will your pickle business be selling pickle chips? 
My wife got me on to this "new thing"  I accidentally bought the wrong kind of pickles and when I suggested we turn them into chips she refused to believe I could cut them thin enough for that use. Hmmmm ..Where did I hide those waterstones I never used?   (OK, sorry for changing the subject)  Back to Blackstone.  ...........
I think Blackstone or anyone else seeking to emulate them needs a different business model.  There doesn't look like there is a strong enough market to support the enormous up front investment in building models the way they have done in the past. I hope they can salvage their current investment in the K36 project.  I think the rest of us should be thankful that Blackstone's past efforts have created a pool of locomotives and rolling stock that will rotate between owners over the years as people leave this corner of the hobby and new folks arrive. 
If we really want new K28's and K36's we may have to participate in their building.  One way for this to happen is for Blackstone to see the need to change direction and be willing to investigate if there is any money to be made in some utilization of their current investment as it stands.  Given that the mechanism of the loco is the hardest part to manufacture correctly perhaps having some critical pieces may encourage a few skilled model builders to take on a semi-scratch build project. 
An accurate frame as well as cylinder block, drivers, counterweights, rods and valve gear links might be enough to start the ball rolling there.  And if a "kit" of parts is available I'm willing to bet that ten such kits will be sold (mostly) to relatively young modelers for every one who actually starts a build when he receives the parts.  I hope folks closer to the hobby and its suppliers than myself will pursue this line of thinking to see if it can bear fruit.
We have lots of tools and techniques available for scratch building today that were the stuff of dreams 50 years ago.  And there will always be a few bright minds who will figure out how to use them to build things no one else can build. And beyond them all the folks like myself who simply accumulate more projects than one lifetime can finish.
Ed Weldon

Re: Blackstone future- US production

Climax@...
 

As far as intricate kits go, if the new modeler is not going to build Labell, Red Ball, Robb, and other easy kits then I highly doubt they will ever assemble a locomotive kit.  I have seen many of the geared Westside Locomotives that came out in kit form and have yet to see one built.  

Sorry no pickle chips, although down at the stock yards we do have some Angus Chips! hahahahahah

-----Original Message-----
From: Ed Weldon <23.weldon@...>
Sent: Apr 18, 2019 2:42 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Blackstone future- US production

Dave - Will your pickle business be selling pickle chips? 
My wife got me on to this "new thing"  I accidentally bought the wrong kind of pickles and when I suggested we turn them into chips she refused to believe I could cut them thin enough for that use. Hmmmm ..Where did I hide those waterstones I never used?   (OK, sorry for changing the subject)  Back to Blackstone.  ...........
I think Blackstone or anyone else seeking to emulate them needs a different business model.  There doesn't look like there is a strong enough market to support the enormous up front investment in building models the way they have done in the past. I hope they can salvage their current investment in the K36 project.  I think the rest of us should be thankful that Blackstone's past efforts have created a pool of locomotives and rolling stock that will rotate between owners over the years as people leave this corner of the hobby and new folks arrive. 
If we really want new K28's and K36's we may have to participate in their building.  One way for this to happen is for Blackstone to see the need to change direction and be willing to investigate if there is any money to be made in some utilization of their current investment as it stands.  Given that the mechanism of the loco is the hardest part to manufacture correctly perhaps having some critical pieces may encourage a few skilled model builders to take on a semi-scratch build project. 
An accurate frame as well as cylinder block, drivers, counterweights, rods and valve gear links might be enough to start the ball rolling there.  And if a "kit" of parts is available I'm willing to bet that ten such kits will be sold (mostly) to relatively young modelers for every one who actually starts a build when he receives the parts.  I hope folks closer to the hobby and its suppliers than myself will pursue this line of thinking to see if it can bear fruit.
We have lots of tools and techniques available for scratch building today that were the stuff of dreams 50 years ago.  And there will always be a few bright minds who will figure out how to use them to build things no one else can build. And beyond them all the folks like myself who simply accumulate more projects than one lifetime can finish.
Ed Weldon

Re: Blackstone future- US production

Arthur Chappell
 

Shades of Gordon Varney.

Happy Trails,

Arthur

On 4/18/2019 2:42 PM, Ed Weldon wrote:

KCNG 2019 Annual Meet

Larry Alfred
 

In the past this announcement has been sent to Yahoo Groups that were thought to have interest.  With the recent conversion of some groups to the io system, this is also being sent to some of those groups. Sincere apologies for duplication. If any group does not allow such meeting announcements, please let me know off-line.  Hope many of you will be able to attend…always a fun time.

 

 

16th Annual KCNG Narrow Gauge Meet

 

 

An invitation to all Narrow Gaugers (and all other model railroaders, too!),

 

The Kansas City Area Narrow Gaugers (KCNG) will host their 16th Annual Narrow Gauge Meet on Saturday, June 8, 2019

 

The meet will be held at a different location than last year, but at a location we have met at before. The meet will be held at the Antioch Branch of the Johnson County Library at 8700 Shawnee Mission Parkway, Merriam, Kansas.  To get there, take the Shawnee Mission Parkway (63rd St.)exit east from I-35 to Antioch (about ¼ mile), turn left on Antioch, and then turn left again into the library.  This is a different location than that held last year.  However, we are now back to the location that we have used for many previous years.

 

The fun will begin at 9:00am with registration and socializing.  We will have clinics in the morning.  A lunch will be provided near noon.  A Show-and-Tell session will be held after lunch.  Please bring something to display and share with the group.  We will then have model railroad layouts available to visit during the afternoon.  Meet/Layout Tour activities will wind down at about 5:00 pm.

 

Planned layouts will include:

    • Gary Davidson: On3 D&RGW
    • Peter Ellis: Sn3 RGS
    • John Vandenberg: HOn3 D&RGW

 

Planned clinics will be presented by:

  • Ryan Moats
  • Pete Smith
  • Jeff Boock

 

Cost: $10.00 (includes morning donuts/coffee and lunch).

 

Advance registrations are required by June 4, 2019, so that we can plan for lunch.  Mail registration with your check to:

 

Larry Alfred

14633 S. Chalet Drive

Olathe, KS  66062

Make checks payable to Larry Alfred

 

For any of you coming in from out of town on Friday night, please consider joining us for barbeque at Jack Stack restaurant.  Contact me for details.

 

It should be a great day to share narrow gauge modeling and conversation.  You are all invited to participate!!  Email me off line (captlalfred@...) if you have questions.  Hope to see you on June 8.

 

 

 

For Sale: 120 HOn3 Brass Items

Matthew Dowd
 

Group,

I have about 120 pieces of HOn3 brass from a recently acquired collection. These range from factory mint models to project pieces. Roads include the D&RGW, RGS, C&S, and others. All models are sold as-is and untested.

I have included a list below. Prices are included but reasonable offers on multiple items will be considered. Additionally, I have agreed to donate 5% of the profits to the Friends of the C&TS to further their restoration efforts.

Please respond with all inquiries directly via personal message or via email using matt DOT dowd 4 AT sbcglobal DOT net. Buyer pays shipping and PayPal is preferred. Thank you for you time and happy modeling!

-Matthew Dowd

Jefferson

Jeff Young
 

My town of Jefferson is coming along.  The schoolyard is now done, as well as Almgren Bros. sawmill (which in the real world was several miles outside of town).







Re: Jefferson

Mark Rosche
 

👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻 love the details, especially the ground cover and the way everything blends together!!!

Regards,

Mark

Don‘t take life too seriously...no one gets out alive anyway....

Re: Jefferson

Mark Lewis
 

Jeff:

Outstanding modeling!!  Thanks for sharing your progress......

Mark Lewis


On Fri, Apr 19, 2019 at 1:16 PM Jeff Young <jeff@...> wrote:
My town of Jefferson is coming along.  The schoolyard is now done, as well as Almgren Bros. sawmill (which in the real world was several miles outside of town).







Re: Jefferson

Mike Van Hove
 

I can almost smell the wood smoke from the stoves.

Very nice work!

Thanks for sharing.

Mike Van Hove


On Apr 19, 2019, at 12:16 PM, Jeff Young <jeff@...> wrote:

My town of Jefferson is coming along.  The schoolyard is now done, as well as Almgren Bros. sawmill (which in the real world was several miles outside of town).








Re: Jefferson

Dale Buxton
 

WOW! Your scenery techniques are spot on for South Park! As a child our church had an older couple that were born and raised in South Park, that owned a ranch a few miles West of Jefferson. About half way between Jefferson and Como. Near where Jefferson Estates are now. Our church would have picnics on their ranch every summer. I have many fond memories of those picnics. The Park is probably one of the most beautiful areas in the state. And you are capturing it in miniature just beautifully. 
Thank you for sharing!
Dale Buxton
  

On Fri, Apr 19, 2019 at 11:21 AM Mark Lewis <narrowrails12@...> wrote:
Jeff:

Outstanding modeling!!  Thanks for sharing your progress......

Mark Lewis

On Fri, Apr 19, 2019 at 1:16 PM Jeff Young <jeff@...> wrote:
My town of Jefferson is coming along.  The schoolyard is now done, as well as Almgren Bros. sawmill (which in the real world was several miles outside of town).







Re: Jefferson

Brian Kopp
 

Wow Jeff that detail is inspiring! I hope the school children (parishioners?) don't mind the noise from the mill! 
And naming the town after yourself......impressive! =)

Brian

Re: Model building philosophy

burr.stewart@...
 

I had a thought the other day that there is a "depth of focus" issue in modeling, related to "storytelling". There are places on my layout only 2 square inches that tell a story, and some that are 30 feet long. But many places where things are jumbled together and don't tell a coherent story, like two otherwise nice buildings or roads that don't make sense being so close to each other. Perhaps this applies to parts of a particular model as well. I've seen layouts where the entire room tells a coherent story, but sadly mine misses the mark, and appears somewhat chaotic, like a storyteller that keeps getting distracted from his main point. I would keep talking about this, but fear that it would only confirm my suspicion that my writing style is just as chaotic as my layout! :)

Health & modeling

Margie & Larry Galkowski
 

Hi guys;
Since there has been talk of health & modeling I hope this is motivational.
I had a work accident back in 2001 which left my right hand with just my thumb & 1/3 of my little pinky, yes I am right handed.  Being a mechanic by trade I try to find tools that aid me in my work.
Since I freelance it makes  scenery  more simple to do. No particular place.
I have scratch built buildings such as the machine shed & barn. I have built rolling stock kits like P. S., Rio Grande Models. Evan things like a Holt  Crawler & custom built turnouts. I use modeling for therapy & take my time & often get frustrated then I sit back & think about it & catch my breath.
See some attached photos of what I talk about. Just a few so not to bore you all.
Thanks for listening.
Larry G

Re: Model building philosophy

lloyd lehrer
 

So Burr, is the philosophy that your layout should "tell" a story that is consistent with the scene being modeled or that the layout overall should have a realistic/coordinated story? Or am I missing  it?  

I was just admiring the images of Jeff's images of Jefferson and probably would not have noticed his sawmill being a noisy operation just across from where the school marm was trying to get kids settled in for some instruction. Having a lot of teachers in my family, I am atuned to their concerns, but did not notice it until he pointed out the sawmill being relocated.  

I find a lot of things very incongruous in the real world that we have and would tell a story if we knew how it got there. So is the story the  problem or just reflecting reality?


lloyd lehrer, (310)951-9097


On Fri, Apr 19, 2019, 12:11 PM <burr.stewart@...> wrote:
I had a thought the other day that there is a "depth of focus" issue in modeling, related to "storytelling". There are places on my layout only 2 square inches that tell a story, and some that are 30 feet long. But many places where things are jumbled together and don't tell a coherent story, like two otherwise nice buildings or roads that don't make sense being so close to each other. Perhaps this applies to parts of a particular model as well. I've seen layouts where the entire room tells a coherent story, but sadly mine misses the mark, and appears somewhat chaotic, like a storyteller that keeps getting distracted from his main point. I would keep talking about this, but fear that it would only confirm my suspicion that my writing style is just as chaotic as my layout! :)


--
lloyd lehrer

Re: Health & modeling

 

Well Larry I would say your doing just fine... nice modeling. Motivational for us is right.
When there is a will there is a way... or... just deal with it. You have succeeded.
Gordon Spalty

Re: Health & modeling

Climax@...
 

Doesn't Bar Mills have a butcher shop called 6 fingered Louies Meats?  Seems kind of ironic its not on your layout!
Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: Margie & Larry Galkowski
Sent: Apr 19, 2019 3:26 PM
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: [HOn3] Health & modeling

Hi guys;
Since there has been talk of health & modeling I hope this is motivational.
I had a work accident back in 2001 which left my right hand with just my thumb & 1/3 of my little pinky, yes I am right handed.  Being a mechanic by trade I try to find tools that aid me in my work.
Since I freelance it makes  scenery  more simple to do. No particular place.
I have scratch built buildings such as the machine shed & barn. I have built rolling stock kits like P. S., Rio Grande Models. Evan things like a Holt  Crawler & custom built turnouts. I use modeling for therapy & take my time & often get frustrated then I sit back & think about it & catch my breath.
See some attached photos of what I talk about. Just a few so not to bore you all.
Thanks for listening.
Larry G

Re: Health & modeling

Margie & Larry Galkowski
 

Dave'
Its not Bar Mills but will this do.
Larry G