Date   

Re: Code 70 to 55 Transitions

asandrini
 

I have added code 70 sidings rail to my code 83 mainline.  Just for giggles. I wondered what would happen if I slipped my 70 rail into the 83 joiner. Exactly, wiggle room up, down and side to side. I slipped a piece of strip wood under the 70 rail to push it up against the top of the joiner, and the rails were flush. I as aligned the inside of the rails and flowed solder into the joiner and it worked perfectly.

Previously, I did the cutting away of the larger rail and soldered the smaller rail on top of the remaining flange. 

Big Al from Cal



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "Robert Bell via Groups.Io" <ionhoss@...>
Date: 11/15/18 5:21 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: HOn3@groups.io
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Code 70 to 55 Transitions

I've been doing some code 70 to code 55 transitions also.  I take a short length of code 70 rail, slip a code 70 rail joiner 1/2 way on and flatten the other half with a pair of flat jaw pliers.  Remove the joiner and install on track on layout.  Then simply solder the code 55 rail on top of the flattened joiner, and smooth the railheads as needed.  Of course you do have to make sure the rails are properly alligned.  Actually, this goes really quick.

Rob Bell
Waynesville, NC


On Wed, Nov 14, 2018 at 11:11 AM, Dusty
<dustburm@q.com> wrote:
Yesterdays project. Remove 1/8" 70 web and head with jewelers saw and rail cutters. File 70 base to solder 55 on top of 70 base at correct height (Mark II Eyeball Methode). A bit of filing with #4 and finish with 400 sanding block.

Dusty Burman 


Re: Code 70 to 55 Transitions

Robert Bell
 

I've been doing some code 70 to code 55 transitions also.  I take a short length of code 70 rail, slip a code 70 rail joiner 1/2 way on and flatten the other half with a pair of flat jaw pliers.  Remove the joiner and install on track on layout.  Then simply solder the code 55 rail on top of the flattened joiner, and smooth the railheads as needed.  Of course you do have to make sure the rails are properly alligned.  Actually, this goes really quick.

Rob Bell
Waynesville, NC


On Wed, Nov 14, 2018 at 11:11 AM, Dusty
<dustburm@q.com> wrote:
Yesterdays project. Remove 1/8" 70 web and head with jewelers saw and rail cutters. File 70 base to solder 55 on top of 70 base at correct height (Mark II Eyeball Methode). A bit of filing with #4 and finish with 400 sanding block.

Dusty Burman 


C&C/SP Owenyo, CA transfer trestle?

NarrowMinded1
 

Does anyone know where drawings of the C&C/SP Owenyo, CA transfer trestle can be found? Thanks in advance!
--
Nathan M. Kline
McConnellsburg, PA 17233


Code 70 to 55 Transitions

Dusty
 

Yesterdays project. Remove 1/8" 70 web and head with jewelers saw and rail cutters. File 70 base to solder 55 on top of 70 base at correct height (Mark II Eyeball Methode). A bit of filing with #4 and finish with 400 sanding block.

Dusty Burman 


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Jim Marlett
 

I’m in the build it yourself camp. It really isn’t that hard to scratch build a turnout. Whether you do it with PC board ties or the old fashioned way, the same principles apply. There is a lot of info out there on building your own. With a little care and an NMRA gauge for your scale and gauge, you really can do this.

Jim Marlett
http://flatheaddrag.com/
http://jimmarlett.zenfolio.com/

On Nov 12, 2018, at 1:40 AM, Jim Betz <jimbetz@jimbetz.com> wrote:

Hi,
As I understand it - the O.P. only needs to have -1- curved HOn3 turnout. My
advice it to just buy it! We've already spent more time on "whether or not you
can take a straight turnout and make it curved" than it would take to scratch
build it ... just because it might be possible ... it doesn't make sense (at least
not to me).
- Jim B.


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Spike
 

Yup, Bob, should be do-able.  The only issue or challenge will be the approximation of the curve using the straight frog.  Lay out some flex track with the frog in the correct place underneath it and then trace the flex track. 

Honestly though you may be more pleased with a handmade frog.

You don't need the aluminum jigs, just use the paper templates from fast tracks as a reference and use the flextrack sketch for your template and lots of double stick tap.  Sounds like you have a points tool, so use the largest one for the frog and the fill the gap in the frog point with solder.

I only have the #6 tool and I spread the rails and fill for #4's and #5's etc.

Attached is my current project cutting and pasting a bunch of #5 and #6 turnouts and wyes to build a storage yard.  to maybe give you some inspiration....

Todd
Canton Mo.


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Chris Kodani <ckodani@...>
 

I think Ed is on to something: kitbashing works for cars, locos, and structures, so maybe “kitbashing” a turnout would work. Could be less expensive than buying a custom one too. Certainly worth trying, even if only to see if it can be done!


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Ed Tibbetts
 

Robert, I agree with Jim. It isn't rocket science. Draw it, build it. If you don't feel you can make the points, notched running rails, and frog, take apart a commercial turnout. I have not built a turnout since the late 80's, but it only took me a couple of hours to make one in place last night.
Ed T.


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Robert Herrick
 

Hi Jim,

In my working years when I was earning money I'd have bought the Fast Tracks jig and been done with it. I'm in my seventies, however, and working out strategies to acquire 30 freight cars and another locomotive are daunting enough. Years ago I'd have purchased 30 Blackstone cars. I can acquire a few, but I'm going to be buiding a lot of Railine kits. The Fast Tracks jig is $130, i.e. one-and-a-half Blackstone cars. I simply have to weigh the trade-offs in light of the overall projected cost of building and equipping the layout. Having said that, the easiest solution may still be to buy the danged fixture or hire someone to build the turnout. Another member of this list offered to do so we'll see. Appreciate your point of view.

Bob Herrick



Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Jim Betz <jimbetz@...>
 

Hi,
  As I understand it - the O.P. only needs to have -1- curved HOn3 turnout.  My
advice it to just buy it!  We've already spent more time on "whether or not you
can take a straight turnout and make it curved" than it would take to scratch
build it ... just because it might be possible ... it doesn't make sense (at least
not to me).
                                                                                            - Jim B.


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Jim Spencer
 

Slight correction:  CVMW makes switch kits and switch tie strips ranging from #5 through #9.  Sorry for the typo.

I have suggested to Jeff Parker who owns Central Valley (a diemaker by training) to consider making injection molded HOn3 switch tie strips that would be suitable for code 70 and code 55, maybe even code 40.  

He has started making curvable tie strips (not switch tie strips) for N scale using code 55 rail.  But so far no switch tie strips and nothing for HOn3. 

I have encouraged him to consider HOn3 switch tie strips because of the surge in HOn3 popularity brought on by Blackstone.  To date he seems to be focusing on N scale and on his many bridge kits.

Comments from all of us might nudge him to reconsider this.  His website is CVMW.com.  It has a contact portal where you can write him a message.  Never hurts!  
Jim

On Nov 11, 2018, at 12:54 PM, Jim Spencer <trainmanjs@...> wrote:

I don’t see any mention of using Details West switch point and frog kits.  Check out their website.  Paul Federiconi who makes them offers a full line of cast frog and points kits that also include guard rails, all with cast in bolt detail, clamps, etc.  He has kits ranging from #5 through #8 in code 83, code 70, and code 55.  In addition he has #9s in code 83.  Code 55 is really best for HOn3 in terms of scale appearance and their code 55 point rails are shorter, meaning more room for curving the remainder of the switch.  

In terms of curvable turnouts, the higher the frog number (narrower the angle), the more curvable the switch becomes - i.e. the inner curve maintains a higher radius.  So #8s would be best.  It results in the lowest likelihood for derailments.

You might also check CVMW (Central Valley) who make switch kits that are curvable.  Theirs is code 83 and code 70 and their frogs range from #8 - #9.  Their tie strips sold separately are really great and I have considered sectioning them down from HO to HOn3 widths.  Something to think about.

Jim

On Nov 11, 2018, at 10:48 AM, tonyk537 via Groups.Io <Tonyk375@...> wrote:

I thought he still made them.  I have a number of his turnouts on my layout.  If you give him the radii that you would like.  We also had some oddball turnout needs on Dick Dorman's layout.  We just traced it out and sent it to Cliff.  He made them up for us.  Also made us the three way stub switches in Rico.

Cliff also has the entire Classic Miniatures Line.  Saw the FD Works Hardware kit (Telluride) go through Ebay a couple of time lately, selling for $20 -30 higher than you can buy it new from Cliff. This is the contact information:
719-395-8076 
http://www.troutcreekeng.co/

Thanks,  

tony
<IMG_9070.JPG>

James G. Spencer, Architect, AIA 






James G. Spencer, Architect, AIA 






Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Jim Spencer
 

I don’t see any mention of using Details West switch point and frog kits.  Check out their website.  Paul Federiconi who makes them offers a full line of cast frog and points kits that also include guard rails, all with cast in bolt detail, clamps, etc.  He has kits ranging from #5 through #8 in code 83, code 70, and code 55.  In addition he has #9s in code 83.  Code 55 is really best for HOn3 in terms of scale appearance and their code 55 point rails are shorter, meaning more room for curving the remainder of the switch.  

In terms of curvable turnouts, the higher the frog number (narrower the angle), the more curvable the switch becomes - i.e. the inner curve maintains a higher radius.  So #8s would be best.  It results in the lowest likelihood for derailments.

You might also check CVMW (Central Valley) who make switch kits that are curvable.  Theirs is code 83 and code 70 and their frogs range from #8 - #9.  Their tie strips sold separately are really great and I have considered sectioning them down from HO to HOn3 widths.  Something to think about.

Jim

On Nov 11, 2018, at 10:48 AM, tonyk537 via Groups.Io <Tonyk375@...> wrote:

I thought he still made them.  I have a number of his turnouts on my layout.  If you give him the radii that you would like.  We also had some oddball turnout needs on Dick Dorman's layout.  We just traced it out and sent it to Cliff.  He made them up for us.  Also made us the three way stub switches in Rico.

Cliff also has the entire Classic Miniatures Line.  Saw the FD Works Hardware kit (Telluride) go through Ebay a couple of time lately, selling for $20 -30 higher than you can buy it new from Cliff. This is the contact information:
719-395-8076 
http://www.troutcreekeng.co/

Thanks,  

tony
<IMG_9070.JPG>

James G. Spencer, Architect, AIA 






Re: Bending ME Turnouts

tonyk537
 

I thought he still made them.  I have a number of his turnouts on my layout.  If you give him the radii that you would like.  We also had some oddball turnout needs on Dick Dorman's layout.  We just traced it out and sent it to Cliff.  He made them up for us.  Also made us the three way stub switches in Rico.

Cliff also has the entire Classic Miniatures Line.  Saw the FD Works Hardware kit (Telluride) go through Ebay a couple of time lately, selling for $20 -30 higher than you can buy it new from Cliff. This is the contact information:
719-395-8076 
http://www.troutcreekeng.co/

Thanks,  

tony


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

kevin b
 

well, then the ties are too small. that may or may not make any difference to folks, but, it'll look a little bit off next to HON3 track and ties etc.
plus, I think the N scale rail is not going to match up just right either.
however, I don't see why it couldn't be done.




Maybe start with an N scale switch, and then widen? The points would only travel a little more. N is 9mm gauge and HOn3 is something like 10.5mm?



Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Joe Ferguson
 

Cliff does still build curved HOn3 turnouts. I received one from him not long ago. 

Joe 

Joe B. Ferguson
_,_._,_


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Chris Kodani <ckodani@...>
 

Stub switch?


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Chris Kodani <ckodani@...>
 

Maybe start with an N scale switch, and then widen? The points would only travel a little more. N is 9mm gauge and HOn3 is something like 10.5mm?


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Dave Trimble
 

Chris,

Unfortunately the points for the standard gauge switch are to far apart; they need to be made closer together to fit between the stock rails.

Dave


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Chris Kodani <ckodani@...>
 

Hi Bob, just thinking outside the box here (being HOn30 makes me do crazy things sometimes). Would it be possible to buy a premade (cheapest possible) curved switch in HO standard, and then re-gauge to 3 foot? I think you’d only need to move the outside rails. Chris Kodani 


Re: Bending ME Turnouts

Bill Lugg
 

BK Enterprises doesn't advertise them, but Railway Engineering
(http://www.railwayeng.com/turnouts.htm) says "You draw it - We build
it!".  So, for a price Mr. Hatch can conjure up anything you can
conceive, I would imagine.  I hear his stuff is real good too.

Bill Lugg

On 11/10/18 11:44 AM, tonyk537 via Groups.Io wrote:
Does Cliff in Buena Vista at BK Enterprises (Trout Creek)  still make
curved switches?  I have a number of his curved turnouts on my layout.

Phone, (719) 395-8076 · Address. 12874 County Road 314B; Buena Vista,
Colorado 81211 ... Trout Creek Engineering,

7001 - 7020 of 8628