Date   

Re: K-28 For Sale

Earl Knoob
 

FYI  This looks like a mid-1960's version.  PFM made multiple runs of K-28's back then.  I have a 1970 version.  The big giveaway is the safety tread running boards and the tender coupler pocket that was used before Kadee invented HOn3 couplers and we   were on our own to figure out how to stuff a SG Kadee or a dummy coupler into the back of the tender...

Ah... the bad old days of HOn3. 


From: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io> on behalf of clint watkins <Shadowrock39@...>
Sent: Thursday, February 17, 2022 9:42 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] K-28 For Sale
 
Was interested in the K 28 and extras . If you could email me back 
Thanks.

Clint Watkins

On Wed, Feb 16, 2022, 11:37 AM Rio Grande via groups.io <threefootmodels=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here are some pics private message me if interested  thank you 


Re: K-28 For Sale

clint watkins
 

Was interested in the K 28 and extras . If you could email me back 
Thanks.

Clint Watkins

On Wed, Feb 16, 2022, 11:37 AM Rio Grande via groups.io <threefootmodels=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here are some pics private message me if interested  thank you 


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Glenn Butcher
 

Thanks,  we'll see how printing goes...

I bought a Elegoo Mars 3.  The 4k led promises higher resolution, most comparisons conclude about 35% better than 2k.  I aligned the build plate and set the Z axis zero point, but I haven't printed yet. I'm first building a combo printer cabinet/ paint booth that'll use the same exhaust system. 


On Wed, Feb 16, 2022 at 09:07 AM, Bill Lugg wrote:
That's impressive, nice work.  I took a look at Open SCAD, but couldn't
seem to wrap my head around it.  I use FreeCAD to do my 3D modeling.  I
find it much easier to visualize things in a graphical environment.  It
works on the concept of parametric "sketches", followed by performing
pads, pockets, rotations, lofts, etc.  Your dome example would be
constructed with a rotation to construct the basic dome and a pocket to
remove to boiler void - two sketches and two solid operations.  Just two
different way of accomplishing the same goal.

You're absolutely right about Shapeways' brass casting capabilities. 
The price is a little steep, but the results are beautiful.  Another
source for 3D prints is All3DP (CraftCloud). I've found them to be much
more reasonably priced in many cases. Just recently, I submitted a model
to Shapeways for printing in their high detail resin and they were going
charge me $30 plus shipping for one of them (i needed two), CraftCloud
came up with a printer that would do it for a little over $11 for the
pair in the same material.  I'm supposed to see the results Saturday. 
All of my past orders through them have been outstanding.

By the way, what printer did you buy?  I'm in the market for one and am
interested in what others are choosing.

Bill Lugg

On 2/16/22 08:49, Glenn Butcher wrote:
For a long time I've wanted to do brass scratchbuilding. Recently, I
set out to do just that, and came to the conclusion that a $2-3000US
investment in machine tools just wasn't practical.  I guess I want to
build the model just a little more than I want to learn machining...  :D

I just bought a resin 3D printer, and I'm going to try a
"print-if-possible" approach, similar to what Jeff Kraker did for his
On3 Shay, described here:
https://forum.mrhmag.com/post/3d-printed-shay-done-12219855. Some
things you just can't get away from metal, e.g., drivers. Nigel
mentioned domes, and that's the thing that really got me thinking
about printing.  I researched how folk were cutting domes on a lathe,
watched a video of a fellow cutting the curved base with a fly cutter
on a lathe, then turned to a simple script in OpenSCAD which did the
same thing by subtracting a cylinder from the base, easy-peasy.  Well,
maybe not so easy if you've never done such, but the tools to do it
take up so much less space.

I know this is going to look complicated, but like most things
computer, it's pretty simple once you understand what's going on. This
is a screenshot of my DRG #168 steam dome model, and a piece of the
script that defines it.  The highlighted line, #41, is the cylinder
that's subtracted from the base with the difference() command at line
#33 to make the curved base to fit the boiler:



This is in OpenSCAD, a script-based CAD tool that lets you define
stuff in a script, rather than drawing it on the screen.  I find it
easier to express specific dimensions such as this dome-boiler
interface in text commands that can be edited more easily than mousing
around on the screen.  The whole steam dome is described in 92 lines,
and I've since found a simpler way to do the base than you see here

If metal is really what  you want to do, Shapeways offers a cast-brass
option, a bit pricey, but the results are sure pretty...

I've described all this because I've found that, while there's a bunch
of HOn3 parts out there for printing, the selection is based on the
interests of specific modelers, so chances of finding your specific
thing is rather small.  Me, I couldn't find Baldwin T-12 domes, so I
had to script my own.  It's not that hard once you learn the ropes,
but it's a barrier to using 3D printing as a machining alternative...


Re: K-28 For Sale

Rio Grande
 

Here are some pics private message me if interested  thank you 


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Bill Lugg
 

That's impressive, nice work.  I took a look at Open SCAD, but couldn't
seem to wrap my head around it.  I use FreeCAD to do my 3D modeling.  I
find it much easier to visualize things in a graphical environment.  It
works on the concept of parametric "sketches", followed by performing
pads, pockets, rotations, lofts, etc.  Your dome example would be
constructed with a rotation to construct the basic dome and a pocket to
remove to boiler void - two sketches and two solid operations.  Just two
different way of accomplishing the same goal.

You're absolutely right about Shapeways' brass casting capabilities. 
The price is a little steep, but the results are beautiful.  Another
source for 3D prints is All3DP (CraftCloud). I've found them to be much
more reasonably priced in many cases. Just recently, I submitted a model
to Shapeways for printing in their high detail resin and they were going
charge me $30 plus shipping for one of them (i needed two), CraftCloud
came up with a printer that would do it for a little over $11 for the
pair in the same material.  I'm supposed to see the results Saturday. 
All of my past orders through them have been outstanding.

By the way, what printer did you buy?  I'm in the market for one and am
interested in what others are choosing.

Bill Lugg

On 2/16/22 08:49, Glenn Butcher wrote:
For a long time I've wanted to do brass scratchbuilding. Recently, I
set out to do just that, and came to the conclusion that a $2-3000US
investment in machine tools just wasn't practical.  I guess I want to
build the model just a little more than I want to learn machining...  :D

I just bought a resin 3D printer, and I'm going to try a
"print-if-possible" approach, similar to what Jeff Kraker did for his
On3 Shay, described here:
https://forum.mrhmag.com/post/3d-printed-shay-done-12219855. Some
things you just can't get away from metal, e.g., drivers. Nigel
mentioned domes, and that's the thing that really got me thinking
about printing.  I researched how folk were cutting domes on a lathe,
watched a video of a fellow cutting the curved base with a fly cutter
on a lathe, then turned to a simple script in OpenSCAD which did the
same thing by subtracting a cylinder from the base, easy-peasy.  Well,
maybe not so easy if you've never done such, but the tools to do it
take up so much less space.

I know this is going to look complicated, but like most things
computer, it's pretty simple once you understand what's going on. This
is a screenshot of my DRG #168 steam dome model, and a piece of the
script that defines it.  The highlighted line, #41, is the cylinder
that's subtracted from the base with the difference() command at line
#33 to make the curved base to fit the boiler:



This is in OpenSCAD, a script-based CAD tool that lets you define
stuff in a script, rather than drawing it on the screen.  I find it
easier to express specific dimensions such as this dome-boiler
interface in text commands that can be edited more easily than mousing
around on the screen.  The whole steam dome is described in 92 lines,
and I've since found a simpler way to do the base than you see here

If metal is really what  you want to do, Shapeways offers a cast-brass
option, a bit pricey, but the results are sure pretty...

I've described all this because I've found that, while there's a bunch
of HOn3 parts out there for printing, the selection is based on the
interests of specific modelers, so chances of finding your specific
thing is rather small.  Me, I couldn't find Baldwin T-12 domes, so I
had to script my own.  It's not that hard once you learn the ropes,
but it's a barrier to using 3D printing as a machining alternative...


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Glenn Butcher
 

For a long time I've wanted to do brass scratchbuilding.  Recently, I set out to do just that, and came to the conclusion that a $2-3000US investment in machine tools just wasn't practical.  I guess I want to build the model just a little more than I want to learn machining...  :D

I just bought a resin 3D printer, and I'm going to try a "print-if-possible" approach, similar to what Jeff Kraker did for his On3 Shay, described here:  https://forum.mrhmag.com/post/3d-printed-shay-done-12219855.  Some things you just can't get away from metal, e.g., drivers.  Nigel mentioned domes, and that's the thing that really got me thinking about printing.  I researched how folk were cutting domes on a lathe, watched a video of a fellow cutting the curved base with a fly cutter on a lathe, then turned to a simple script in OpenSCAD which did the same thing by subtracting a cylinder from the base, easy-peasy.  Well, maybe not so easy if you've never done such, but the tools to do it take up so much less space.  

I know this is going to look complicated, but like most things computer, it's pretty simple once you understand what's going on.  This is a screenshot of my DRG #168 steam dome model, and a piece of the script that defines it.  The highlighted line, #41, is the cylinder that's subtracted from the base with the difference() command at line #33 to make the curved base to fit the boiler:



This is in OpenSCAD, a script-based CAD tool that lets you define stuff in a script, rather than drawing it on the screen.  I find it easier to express specific dimensions such as this dome-boiler interface in text commands that can be edited more easily than mousing around on the screen.  The whole steam dome is described in 92 lines, and I've since found a simpler way to do the base than you see here

If metal is really what  you want to do, Shapeways offers a cast-brass option, a bit pricey, but the results are sure pretty...

I've described all this because I've found that, while there's a bunch of HOn3 parts out there for printing, the selection is based on the interests of specific modelers, so chances of finding your specific thing is rather small.  Me, I couldn't find Baldwin T-12 domes, so I had to script my own.  It's not that hard once you learn the ropes, but it's a barrier to using 3D printing as a machining alternative...


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Bill Lugg
 

Exactly!

Also, my experience with the lathe has been the opposite of a couple of
recent posters.  While I don't use it often, I have used it a fair
amount and when I needed it, nothing else would do.

It's just like my 3D printer, it's not running 24/7, but it's a life
saver when I need a complex part that would have taken hours or day to
make by hand.

Bill Lugg

On 2/16/22 08:23, Jeff Young wrote:
I’m afraid I’m having a disconnect here.

Hobbies are excuses for buying tools.  They don’t need to be /good/
excuses.


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Jeff Young
 

I’m afraid I’m having a disconnect here.

Hobbies are excuses for buying tools.  They don’t need to be good excuses.


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Climax@...
 

Ditto!  Dave  MMR200

-----Original Message-----
From: <HOn3@groups.io>
Sent: Feb 16, 2022 9:07 AM
To: HOn3@groups.io <HOn3@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [HOn3] Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

 

Hi Roger,
 
Important point from Ed. I'm not sure it's a good investment for HO, S or even O scale work. If you are building G scale then yes, and if you are doing live steam then essential. Since I sold on my equipment I have only needed some milling done on 2 occasions in 8 years. Even then not essential. The lathe once, and that was for reducing the flange on some drivers. I used a $90 cheapo lathe in the end that I use for wood/plastic turning after checking the runout. Definitely not precision lathe standard, but goodenuff.
 
It all depends on what you have a need for. I found that the main item I needed was domes, these days there is plenty of choice from casts or 3D prints. Boilers? Decent set of rollers is much cheaper. Cabs? Etching is much better. Chassis, ditto. And there are inexpensive services that will laser cut metal. I never did get into gear/worm cutting or wheel spoke cutting as there is still plenty of choice out there.
 
I was taught the essentials on a Bridgeport by an old school machinist, moving down to the hobby scale equipment was actually quite frustrating. Gathered dust most of the time.
 
Nigel
 


On Tuesday, February 15, 2022, Ed Weldon <23.weldon@...> wrote:
Roger - Can you be more specific about what you wnat to be able to do with those machine tools? Been my experience over the years that most model railroaders working in the smaller scales have just a few common uses for small lathes and or mills.  Some of these can be accomplished with less tool investment.  Or in some cases more investment in larger equipment is the only path; such as fixture building.  And in some important cases the measuring equipment is just as important as the metal removing equipment.   Ed Weldon

 

 

 


Re: con-cor galloping goose sub-list for HOn3

Mick Moignard
 

I rather agree with Mark, tho I’ve not done one of these either.  I’d suggest checking the parts list that came with the goose, if you still have it, and see what parts are different between the two.  The difference appears to be the large wheels, which have an inner extension for HO which I suspect can be cut off for HOn3, shorter axles stubs for the front wheels, so just cut them off, and different brake details for the two rear trucks for HOn3, shorter stubs to plug in to the truck , so again, careful trimming, 

So as Mark says, you can probably do it all with the bits you already have, just take care and as always, measure twice before cutting!

Mick

________________________________
Mick Moignard
m: +44 7774 652504
Skype: mickmoignard

The week may start M,T but it always ends WTF.


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Nigel Phillips
 

Hi Roger,

Important point from Ed. I'm not sure it's a good investment for HO, S or even O scale work. If you are building G scale then yes, and if you are doing live steam then essential. Since I sold on my equipment I have only needed some milling done on 2 occasions in 8 years. Even then not essential. The lathe once, and that was for reducing the flange on some drivers. I used a $90 cheapo lathe in the end that I use for wood/plastic turning after checking the runout. Definitely not precision lathe standard, but goodenuff.

It all depends on what you have a need for. I found that the main item I needed was domes, these days there is plenty of choice from casts or 3D prints. Boilers? Decent set of rollers is much cheaper. Cabs? Etching is much better. Chassis, ditto. And there are inexpensive services that will laser cut metal. I never did get into gear/worm cutting or wheel spoke cutting as there is still plenty of choice out there.

I was taught the essentials on a Bridgeport by an old school machinist, moving down to the hobby scale equipment was actually quite frustrating. Gathered dust most of the time.

Nigel



On Tuesday, February 15, 2022, Ed Weldon <23.weldon@...> wrote:
Roger - Can you be more specific about what you wnat to be able to do with those machine tools? Been my experience over the years that most model railroaders working in the smaller scales have just a few common uses for small lathes and or mills.  Some of these can be accomplished with less tool investment.  Or in some cases more investment in larger equipment is the only path; such as fixture building.  And in some important cases the measuring equipment is just as important as the metal removing equipment.   Ed Weldon


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

 

Roger - Can you be more specific about what you wnat to be able to do with those machine tools? Been my experience over the years that most model railroaders working in the smaller scales have just a few common uses for small lathes and or mills.  Some of these can be accomplished with less tool investment.  Or in some cases more investment in larger equipment is the only path; such as fixture building.  And in some important cases the measuring equipment is just as important as the metal removing equipment.   Ed Weldon


Re: con-cor galloping goose sub-list for HOn3

Mark Kasprowicz
 

Bill,

I'm not 100% on this but I think they can be narrowed without any other parts. We had a zoom meeting of our Circle here in the UK and this came up in conversation. One or perhaps both of those talking about this are also on this list and hopefully will comment. I've been looking for both versions to get older Balboa geese to run but not done the narrowing conversion yet.

Mark K


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Nigel Phillips
 

Re machine tool cost: I used to have a Taig setup, the cost of the tools was significantly more than the machines. 

Avoid cheap equipment from eBay. 


On Monday, February 14, 2022, John Stutz <john.stutz@...> wrote:
Scott

I will second Dave Barron's recommendation of the Sherline mill < ,">https://www.sherline.com/>, as to good accuracy and sufficient size for HO scale modeling.  And while mine is an early model, and wholly manual, they do offer CNC capability.  But when you start pricing machine tools, of any kind, be aware that you will probably end up spending as much on work holding accessories and cutting tools as you did on the basic machine.

John Stutz
On February 14, 2022 7:41 PM Roger Clay <roger@...> wrote:


Yes, there more than a passing interest in having CNC capability, under $3K. Thanks for asking!

On Feb 14, 2022, at 7:19 PM, Scott < repairman87@...> wrote:

Might want to give an idea of a price range.  Do you want CNC capability?

Scott McDonald 

Roger Clay
The 7th Direction
Marin County, California
mobile & txt: 415-233-1290


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

John Stutz
 

Scott

I will second Dave Barron's recommendation of the Sherline mill < ,">https://www.sherline.com/>, as to good accuracy and sufficient size for HO scale modeling.  And while mine is an early model, and wholly manual, they do offer CNC capability.  But when you start pricing machine tools, of any kind, be aware that you will probably end up spending as much on work holding accessories and cutting tools as you did on the basic machine.

John Stutz

On February 14, 2022 7:41 PM Roger Clay <roger@...> wrote:


Yes, there more than a passing interest in having CNC capability, under $3K. Thanks for asking!

On Feb 14, 2022, at 7:19 PM, Scott < repairman87@...> wrote:

Might want to give an idea of a price range.  Do you want CNC capability?

Scott McDonald 

Roger Clay
The 7th Direction
Marin County, California
mobile & txt: 415-233-1290


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Roger Clay
 

Yes, there more than a passing interest in having CNC capability, under $3K. Thanks for asking!

On Feb 14, 2022, at 7:19 PM, Scott <repairman87@...> wrote:

Might want to give an idea of a price range.  Do you want CNC capability?

Scott McDonald 

Roger Clay
The 7th Direction
Marin County, California
mobile & txt: 415-233-1290


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Scott
 

Might want to give an idea of a price range.  Do you want CNC capability?

Scott McDonald 


Re: Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

Climax@...
 

At one time I worked on the big turret lathes, mills, surface grinders and shapers.  Today for my model use I use two machines, a Sherline Lathe and a Sherline Vertical Mill.  They can hold tolerances to within 2 to 3 thousanths easily.  I highly recommend either one.  I have as much invested in accessories as I do the machines.  Nope, I am not selling them.

Dave Barron

-----Original Message-----
From: <HOn3@groups.io>
Sent: Feb 14, 2022 6:34 PM
To: <HOn3@groups.io>, <RepowerAndRegear@groups.io>, <On3@groups.io>
Subject: [HOn3] Looking for a micro/mini lathe & milling machine

 

Not necessarily an all-in-one. If you have a recommendation or one you want to sell, reply to me directly,
 
— burning rio

Roger Clay
The 7th Direction
Marin County, California
mobile & txt: 415-233-1290

 


K-28 For Sale

Rio Grande
 

Hey all,

I am selling my PFM K-28 it is new condition un painted. The original motor is missing but a new can motor will be included un installed. Also included is a tsunami 2 sound decoder brand new in package along with a Precision Scale (PSC) K-28 cab interior kit. 

I had big plans for the locomotive but sometimes life just gets in the way.

Message me off the forum for more info. Thanks!


Re: con-cor galloping goose sub-list for HOn3

Rio Grande
 

I have a Hon3 version for parts that I'd let go. Message me off the forum.

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