Magruder Park


Timothy Zork
 

Dan,

Thank you for refocusing the discussion on the root issue; I whole-heartedly agree. Renaming the park after an abstract virtue as a response to an explicitly racist and painful history is the nominal equivalent of "All Lives Matter."

We all believe that hope and love are good things. Their value is not what needs to be emphatically declared and affirmed.

Tim

On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 10:56 AM Daniel Broder <dnbroder@...> wrote:
I feel like these adjectives (Hope, Love, Beautiful, etc.) while well intended, miss the point about the reason behind the rename.

The park isn't being renamed because the current space isn't used lovingly or hopefully enough colloquially. Those signs weren't ripped off the pillars because of a lack of good energy or vibes by the current residents who use the park. The Magruder signs came down (and will hopefully stay down forever) because the original owner of that land gave it to the City under the condition that it be named for him and be used exclusively by white people. By doing so, he created an injustice which has left a shadow on that space which has lingered in our community to this day. To not specify the injustice with the restoration (in this case, racism, community-approved segregation and other forms of violence against black people) risks the injustice happening again.

To undo this malfeasance and to heal the wounds that segregation left in this particular park, I strongly believe that it should be named for a black person/people, to show that as a community, we choose to honor all of the amazing black people that Mr. Magruder shut out of our space with his disgusting racism, we choose to say as a community that the park will be far better with their name on it than it ever would be with his adorning those pillars. Here are my initial suggestions:

David Driskall Park (Hyattsville resident, world renown artistic scholar)
Lonise and James Bias Park (decades long advocates for restorative, community substance abuse counseling and gun control, son Len Bias was one of the greatest basketball players in Northwestern High School and University of Maryland history)
Audrey and Frank Peterman Park (pioneering black conservationists working to conserve green and blue spaces, including the Chesapeake Bay)
Lisa Jackson Park (first black administrator of the EPA)
Thurgood Marshall Park (first black Supreme Court Justice, Baltimore, Maryland native, strong anti-segregation lawyer and activist, long-time NAACP leader).

Dan Broder
Madison Street

On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 9:48 AM aprildowns55 via groups.io <Aprilldowns=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Lovely name
> On Jun 26, 2020, at 9:42 AM, Miriam Phillips <miriphil9@...> wrote:
>
> How about simply:
> HOPE Park
>
> named after our wonderful list-serve Hyattsville Organization for Positive Environment & all that represents.
>
> Miriam
>
>





Monica Gorman
 

Harriet Tubman is also from Maryland!

Monica


Nina Faye
 

I still support the Driscoll suggestion. Resident, artist, international expert, teacher, HPA tour.... Nina


On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 10:56 AM, Daniel Broder
<dnbroder@...> wrote:
I feel like these adjectives (Hope, Love, Beautiful, etc.) while well intended, miss the point about the reason behind the rename.

The park isn't being renamed because the current space isn't used lovingly or hopefully enough colloquially. Those signs weren't ripped off the pillars because of a lack of good energy or vibes by the current residents who use the park. The Magruder signs came down (and will hopefully stay down forever) because the original owner of that land gave it to the City under the condition that it be named for him and be used exclusively by white people. By doing so, he created an injustice which has left a shadow on that space which has lingered in our community to this day. To not specify the injustice with the restoration (in this case, racism, community-approved segregation and other forms of violence against black people) risks the injustice happening again.

To undo this malfeasance and to heal the wounds that segregation left in this particular park, I strongly believe that it should be named for a black person/people, to show that as a community, we choose to honor all of the amazing black people that Mr. Magruder shut out of our space with his disgusting racism, we choose to say as a community that the park will be far better with their name on it than it ever would be with his adorning those pillars. Here are my initial suggestions:

David Driskall Park (Hyattsville resident, world renown artistic scholar)
Lonise and James Bias Park (decades long advocates for restorative, community substance abuse counseling and gun control, son Len Bias was one of the greatest basketball players in Northwestern High School and University of Maryland history)
Audrey and Frank Peterman Park (pioneering black conservationists working to conserve green and blue spaces, including the Chesapeake Bay)
Lisa Jackson Park (first black administrator of the EPA)
Thurgood Marshall Park (first black Supreme Court Justice, Baltimore, Maryland native, strong anti-segregation lawyer and activist, long-time NAACP leader).

Dan Broder
Madison Street

On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 9:48 AM aprildowns55 via groups.io <Aprilldowns=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Lovely name
> On Jun 26, 2020, at 9:42 AM, Miriam Phillips <miriphil9@...> wrote:
>
> How about simply:
> HOPE Park
>
> named after our wonderful list-serve Hyattsville Organization for Positive Environment & all that represents.
>
> Miriam
>
>





Marybeth Shea
 

I would like to suggest that a land-acknowledgement name is an option. This means that the story of the Tayac band of the Piscataway are essential for understanding the long history of first belonging, then invitation and sharing, later betrayal, colonization, theft, enslavement, denial, erasure.


Read more about Philip Sheridan Proctor, with his tribal name of Turkey Tayac.


Because of long intermarriage between enslaved black people, free black people, and the tribal communities of the Potomac-Chesapeake watershed, a land ascknowledgement would also include the history of local black communities.

We also need to curate the land, with signage, activities, QR codes to web information -- many ways these discussions can help ensure that we learn about the park and the lands our homes are on.  And, that in perfecting our union, we must first look unflinchingly and honestly at our complex and unfair history.

Mb

On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 1:30 PM Nina Faye via groups.io <ns_faye=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I still support the Driscoll suggestion. Resident, artist, international expert, teacher, HPA tour.... Nina


On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 10:56 AM, Daniel Broder
<dnbroder@...> wrote:
I feel like these adjectives (Hope, Love, Beautiful, etc.) while well intended, miss the point about the reason behind the rename.

The park isn't being renamed because the current space isn't used lovingly or hopefully enough colloquially. Those signs weren't ripped off the pillars because of a lack of good energy or vibes by the current residents who use the park. The Magruder signs came down (and will hopefully stay down forever) because the original owner of that land gave it to the City under the condition that it be named for him and be used exclusively by white people. By doing so, he created an injustice which has left a shadow on that space which has lingered in our community to this day. To not specify the injustice with the restoration (in this case, racism, community-approved segregation and other forms of violence against black people) risks the injustice happening again.

To undo this malfeasance and to heal the wounds that segregation left in this particular park, I strongly believe that it should be named for a black person/people, to show that as a community, we choose to honor all of the amazing black people that Mr. Magruder shut out of our space with his disgusting racism, we choose to say as a community that the park will be far better with their name on it than it ever would be with his adorning those pillars. Here are my initial suggestions:

David Driskall Park (Hyattsville resident, world renown artistic scholar)
Lonise and James Bias Park (decades long advocates for restorative, community substance abuse counseling and gun control, son Len Bias was one of the greatest basketball players in Northwestern High School and University of Maryland history)
Audrey and Frank Peterman Park (pioneering black conservationists working to conserve green and blue spaces, including the Chesapeake Bay)
Lisa Jackson Park (first black administrator of the EPA)
Thurgood Marshall Park (first black Supreme Court Justice, Baltimore, Maryland native, strong anti-segregation lawyer and activist, long-time NAACP leader).

Dan Broder
Madison Street

On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 9:48 AM aprildowns55 via groups.io <Aprilldowns=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Lovely name
> On Jun 26, 2020, at 9:42 AM, Miriam Phillips <miriphil9@...> wrote:
>
> How about simply:
> HOPE Park
>
> named after our wonderful list-serve Hyattsville Organization for Positive Environment & all that represents.
>
> Miriam
>
>






--
Marybeth Shea
Professional Writing Program
English Department
University of Maryland at College Park


Miriam Phillips
 

Sorry my message Was not clear.
I hadn’t meant to name the park after a listserve but what the list serve stands for In our community (at least my understanding of it).
Inclusiveness, the Community of Hyattsville, and Positive Environment. And the meaning of the word Hope and Resilience.
Thanks
M


Kit Slack
 

I just came across an article that made me realize that if the city were to name the park  "Welcome," the park would bear the name of the country's first black female state senator, a Maryland state senator who fought for the integration of public spaces.  


Not really advocating - she's from Baltimore -  just thought people would want to remember her as they had this discussion!

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 9:31 AM Helen Butt <helenmhb@...> wrote:
I would prefer that we not try to choose a person to name the park after. How about a name that reflects our vision of the park. For me, that would be a welcoming name--maybe even "Welcome Park".

Helen Butt


Lisbeth Melendez
 

Here’s a different thought...

I would love to honor the original owe era of these land and name the park after the NACOTCHTANK.

These are the indigenous peoples of the Anacostia, an truly a forgotten population as far I can observe. Really, who knew that factoid besides the historians on the list???

The proximity of the park to their land, the extermination of their community by the callous, and many other reasons lead to this suggestion. 

I would add that the “timeless” names feels like a knee jerk reaction to recognizing those who build the wealth of the country and this county in particular. 

If we were to recognize the greatness of our black siblings I’m sure there many , including those already mentioned on this list, who would bring more honor to the park than its current namesake. 

Just a thought 


On Wed, Jul 1, 2020 at 11:53 AM Kit Slack <kitslack@...> wrote:
I just came across an article that made me realize that if the city were to name the park  "Welcome," the park would bear the name of the country's first black female state senator, a Maryland state senator who fought for the integration of public spaces.  


Not really advocating - she's from Baltimore -  just thought people would want to remember her as they had this discussion!

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 9:31 AM Helen Butt <helenmhb@...> wrote:
I would prefer that we not try to choose a person to name the park after. How about a name that reflects our vision of the park. For me, that would be a welcoming name--maybe even "Welcome Park".

Helen Butt

--
Lisbeth Melendez Rivera
UTS TC Masters in Theology and 
Social Transformation Candidate
240-997-8550



Reid Nelson
 

Lisbeth, I love the idea of naming it after the NACOTCHTANK tribe and had been thinking the same thing. After all, they used and enjoyed this land for 15,000 years, and we only the last 200 after largely exterminating them. Surely their 15,000 years of stewardship warrants recognition.

Reid


Veronica Urquilla <Vwhycoff@...>
 

Yes to the original owners of the land!


On Wed, Jul 1, 2020 at 3:24 PM Lisbeth Melendez <prdyke@...> wrote:
Here’s a different thought...

I would love to honor the original owe era of these land and name the park after the NACOTCHTANK.

These are the indigenous peoples of the Anacostia, an truly a forgotten population as far I can observe. Really, who knew that factoid besides the historians on the list???

The proximity of the park to their land, the extermination of their community by the callous, and many other reasons lead to this suggestion. 

I would add that the “timeless” names feels like a knee jerk reaction to recognizing those who build the wealth of the country and this county in particular. 

If we were to recognize the greatness of our black siblings I’m sure there many , including those already mentioned on this list, who would bring more honor to the park than its current namesake. 

Just a thought 

On Wed, Jul 1, 2020 at 11:53 AM Kit Slack <kitslack@...> wrote:
I just came across an article that made me realize that if the city were to name the park  "Welcome," the park would bear the name of the country's first black female state senator, a Maryland state senator who fought for the integration of public spaces.  


Not really advocating - she's from Baltimore -  just thought people would want to remember her as they had this discussion!

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 9:31 AM Helen Butt <helenmhb@...> wrote:
I would prefer that we not try to choose a person to name the park after. How about a name that reflects our vision of the park. For me, that would be a welcoming name--maybe even "Welcome Park".

Helen Butt

--
Lisbeth Melendez Rivera
UTS TC Masters in Theology and 
Social Transformation Candidate
240-997-8550




--
Veronica Urquilla, MSW, LGSW
Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle.