Topics

new composting program clarification

Julia Barsi
 

Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

Fawaya Mohammed
 

Good morning and happy Thanksgiving to all
I think the one that the city gave out was a bucket with a lid. One time I has put my own personal container and it was taken. My problem is sometimes it is not enough.
Jefferson st




On Thursday, November 28, 2019, 5:49 AM, Julia Barsi via Groups.Io <lindy_circle@...> wrote:

Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

Jim Groves - Moderator
 

I think there will be buckets available for everyone.  The compostable bags are good in theory, but I’ve given up on them because there is always leakage unless you take your compost out every other day. Also, since the compost goes to a large facility that shreds and mixes properly, you can compost meat, bones and even soiled pizza boxes!

Do Compost:


  • fruits and vegetables
  • meats
  • bones
  • coffee grounds and filters
  • soiled paper napkins
  • soiled pizza boxes
  • tea bags and loose tea leaves
  • dairy products
  • egg and seafood shells
  • yard trimmings
  • leaves
  • grass

Do NOT Compost:


  • fats
  • oils
  • leftover grease

Jim

On Nov 28, 2019, at 7:44 AM, Fawaya Mohammed via Groups.Io <Fsam07@...> wrote:

 Good morning and happy Thanksgiving to all
I think the one that the city gave out was a bucket with a lid. One time I has put my own personal container and it was taken. My problem is sometimes it is not enough.
Jefferson st




On Thursday, November 28, 2019, 5:49 AM, Julia Barsi via Groups.Io <lindy_circle@...> wrote:

Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

Rachel
 

Jim, I also gave up on the bags provided by the pilot program, but I bought some extra-strength compostable bags on Amazon that hold up for a week or until our counter bin is full, whichever happens first. I've taken to using those for my small household trash bins, too.


On Thu, Nov 28, 2019, 10:10 AM Jim Groves - Moderator <jgroves4ward2@...> wrote:
I think there will be buckets available for everyone.  The compostable bags are good in theory, but I’ve given up on them because there is always leakage unless you take your compost out every other day. Also, since the compost goes to a large facility that shreds and mixes properly, you can compost meat, bones and even soiled pizza boxes!

Do Compost:


  • fruits and vegetables
  • meats
  • bones
  • coffee grounds and filters
  • soiled paper napkins
  • soiled pizza boxes
  • tea bags and loose tea leaves
  • dairy products
  • egg and seafood shells
  • yard trimmings
  • leaves
  • grass

Do NOT Compost:


  • fats
  • oils
  • leftover grease

Jim

On Nov 28, 2019, at 7:44 AM, Fawaya Mohammed via Groups.Io <Fsam07=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

 Good morning and happy Thanksgiving to all
I think the one that the city gave out was a bucket with a lid. One time I has put my own personal container and it was taken. My problem is sometimes it is not enough.
Jefferson st




On Thursday, November 28, 2019, 5:49 AM, Julia Barsi via Groups.Io <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

FLAWN WILLIAMS
 

One note from our experience with the pilot program: your compost does not have to be contained in a bag once it reaches the five-gallon container that gets put out at the curb. The biodegradable bags are just a convenience to help you keep an in-the-kitchen receptacle clean.

Another note: the pickup crews leave the lids off the screw-top five-gallon buckets when they empty them. Unless you retrieve your bucket pretty quickly, in the warmer months this can lead to flies laying their eggs inside the open bucket. We have to hose our bucket out fairly often.

—Flawn

Jessica Arends
 

Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

marialis zmuda
 

Jessica,

are the bucket and bags still available?  if so, i will take them.

marialis zmuda

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 4:41 PM Jessica Arends <jessica.arends@...> wrote:
Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

mbcsquirrel98
 

I'm excited to hear about the new citywide compost collection!

Would those of you in the pilot program be willing to share your thoughts on the best kitchen or curbside bins (or other supplies) for composting?

Thanks,
Rebecca Morrison

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 04:49:13 PM EST, marialis zmuda <mzmuda48@...> wrote:


Jessica,

are the bucket and bags still available?  if so, i will take them.

marialis zmuda

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 4:41 PM Jessica Arends <jessica.arends@...> wrote:
Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

Mary Kennedy
 

We like the “classic” metal cylinder with lid — you put (replaceable and washable) charcoal filters in the top which prevent it from smelling (though if you have fish skins or raw meat in there I’d empty it quickly) — we use the compostable bags  for ease of transferring into the outdoor collection bucket, and then wash out the inside pail before filling it up again. As Flawn said, the outdoor bucket can get pretty nasty especially in the summer, but wash it out & put in the sun and you’ll be fine. 

We backyard compost as well but this program is great for meat scraps/bones/eggs/breads etc — and winter! No more smelly trash :)

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 17:25 mbcsquirrel98 via Groups.Io <mbcsquirrel98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm excited to hear about the new citywide compost collection!

Would those of you in the pilot program be willing to share your thoughts on the best kitchen or curbside bins (or other supplies) for composting?

Thanks,
Rebecca Morrison

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 04:49:13 PM EST, marialis zmuda <mzmuda48@...> wrote:


Jessica,

are the bucket and bags still available?  if so, i will take them.

marialis zmuda

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 4:41 PM Jessica Arends <jessica.arends@...> wrote:
Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

Rachel
 

The city provided countertop bins for those in the pilot program; I'm not sure if they will do that for everyone as it rolls out citywide.

Whether you prefer a counter bin or a floor bin with a foot pedal or a cupboard bin under your sink is really a matter of personal preference. In theory I prefer the floor bins, but in our current kitchen layout, floor space is at a greater premium so we use the countertop bin provided by the city pilot program.

I do recommend using sturdier compostable bags though, unless you want to take your compost outside daily. The flimsier ones doubtless disintegrate faster in the county facility... But they also disintegrate inside your bin, and I don't enjoy cleaning out the slime every other day when the bag falls apart. I've been using these for a few months with no complaints: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07PQHCVXD/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_BCM4DbEX9XC1J

- Rachel

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019, 5:59 PM Mary Kennedy <kennedy.mary@...> wrote:
We like the “classic” metal cylinder with lid — you put (replaceable and washable) charcoal filters in the top which prevent it from smelling (though if you have fish skins or raw meat in there I’d empty it quickly) — we use the compostable bags  for ease of transferring into the outdoor collection bucket, and then wash out the inside pail before filling it up again. As Flawn said, the outdoor bucket can get pretty nasty especially in the summer, but wash it out & put in the sun and you’ll be fine. 

We backyard compost as well but this program is great for meat scraps/bones/eggs/breads etc — and winter! No more smelly trash :)

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 17:25 mbcsquirrel98 via Groups.Io <mbcsquirrel98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm excited to hear about the new citywide compost collection!

Would those of you in the pilot program be willing to share your thoughts on the best kitchen or curbside bins (or other supplies) for composting?

Thanks,
Rebecca Morrison

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 04:49:13 PM EST, marialis zmuda <mzmuda48@...> wrote:


Jessica,

are the bucket and bags still available?  if so, i will take them.

marialis zmuda

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 4:41 PM Jessica Arends <jessica.arends@...> wrote:
Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

Corrie
 

The city website is clear that they won’t give out bins for the city wide rollout. They aren’t explicit about how they want materials put out for pickup, though. They make it seem like they want compost mixed with yard waste.


-Cȯrrie


On Nov 30, 2019, 07:58 -0500, Rachel <rknoyce@...>, wrote:
The city provided countertop bins for those in the pilot program; I'm not sure if they will do that for everyone as it rolls out citywide.

Whether you prefer a counter bin or a floor bin with a foot pedal or a cupboard bin under your sink is really a matter of personal preference. In theory I prefer the floor bins, but in our current kitchen layout, floor space is at a greater premium so we use the countertop bin provided by the city pilot program.

I do recommend using sturdier compostable bags though, unless you want to take your compost outside daily. The flimsier ones doubtless disintegrate faster in the county facility... But they also disintegrate inside your bin, and I don't enjoy cleaning out the slime every other day when the bag falls apart. I've been using these for a few months with no complaints: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07PQHCVXD/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_BCM4DbEX9XC1J

- Rachel

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019, 5:59 PM Mary Kennedy <kennedy.mary@...> wrote:
We like the “classic” metal cylinder with lid — you put (replaceable and washable) charcoal filters in the top which prevent it from smelling (though if you have fish skins or raw meat in there I’d empty it quickly) — we use the compostable bags  for ease of transferring into the outdoor collection bucket, and then wash out the inside pail before filling it up again. As Flawn said, the outdoor bucket can get pretty nasty especially in the summer, but wash it out & put in the sun and you’ll be fine. 

We backyard compost as well but this program is great for meat scraps/bones/eggs/breads etc — and winter! No more smelly trash :)

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 17:25 mbcsquirrel98 via Groups.Io <mbcsquirrel98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm excited to hear about the new citywide compost collection!

Would those of you in the pilot program be willing to share your thoughts on the best kitchen or curbside bins (or other supplies) for composting?

Thanks,
Rebecca Morrison

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 04:49:13 PM EST, marialis zmuda <mzmuda48@...> wrote:


Jessica,

are the bucket and bags still available?  if so, i will take them.

marialis zmuda

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 4:41 PM Jessica Arends <jessica.arends@...> wrote:
Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

Maureen Roult
 

We've been in the pilot program for a year or so and have yet to have a problem with the 3-gallon bags disintegrating on us.  Maybe it depends on what you put in them.

Maureen Roult
she/her/hers


On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 09:55:28 AM EST, Corrie <corriecar@...> wrote:


The city website is clear that they won’t give out bins for the city wide rollout. They aren’t explicit about how they want materials put out for pickup, though. They make it seem like they want compost mixed with yard waste.


-Cȯrrie


On Nov 30, 2019, 07:58 -0500, Rachel <rknoyce@...>, wrote:
The city provided countertop bins for those in the pilot program; I'm not sure if they will do that for everyone as it rolls out citywide.

Whether you prefer a counter bin or a floor bin with a foot pedal or a cupboard bin under your sink is really a matter of personal preference. In theory I prefer the floor bins, but in our current kitchen layout, floor space is at a greater premium so we use the countertop bin provided by the city pilot program.

I do recommend using sturdier compostable bags though, unless you want to take your compost outside daily. The flimsier ones doubtless disintegrate faster in the county facility... But they also disintegrate inside your bin, and I don't enjoy cleaning out the slime every other day when the bag falls apart. I've been using these for a few months with no complaints: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07PQHCVXD/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_BCM4DbEX9XC1J

- Rachel

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019, 5:59 PM Mary Kennedy <kennedy.mary@...> wrote:
We like the “classic” metal cylinder with lid — you put (replaceable and washable) charcoal filters in the top which prevent it from smelling (though if you have fish skins or raw meat in there I’d empty it quickly) — we use the compostable bags  for ease of transferring into the outdoor collection bucket, and then wash out the inside pail before filling it up again. As Flawn said, the outdoor bucket can get pretty nasty especially in the summer, but wash it out & put in the sun and you’ll be fine. 

We backyard compost as well but this program is great for meat scraps/bones/eggs/breads etc — and winter! No more smelly trash :)

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 17:25 mbcsquirrel98 via Groups.Io <mbcsquirrel98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm excited to hear about the new citywide compost collection!

Would those of you in the pilot program be willing to share your thoughts on the best kitchen or curbside bins (or other supplies) for composting?

Thanks,
Rebecca Morrison

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 04:49:13 PM EST, marialis zmuda <mzmuda48@...> wrote:


Jessica,

are the bucket and bags still available?  if so, i will take them.

marialis zmuda

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 4:41 PM Jessica Arends <jessica.arends@...> wrote:
Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

Cheryl Hoffman
 

Pilot program participants received a letter announcing that we can keep our white compost bins and the small scrap- collecting containers. Of course, I've already tossed the letter in the recycling bin, so someone please correct me if I give incorrect info here.

As I recall, residents joining the composting effort from now on will need to provide their own equipment. The city suggests a latching compost bin for street-side collection; raccoons, dogs, etc. are very clever at getting into less secure containers.  I'm pretty sure compost and yard waste should be kept separate. 

As Maureen said, the biobags are sturdy. I've only had one bag failure, and I had really overstuffed it, then let it sit fora few days, which allowed the bag to weaken. That was a lesson learned!

There are lots of online and local sources for the equipment that's needed, from low price points to high. 

Happy composting!

Cheryl

“Time and trouble will tame an advanced young woman, but an advanced old woman is uncontrollable by any earthly force.”

            Sir Impey Biggs

            (Dorothy Sayers, Clouds of Witness)

 



On Sat, Nov 30, 2019 at 4:30 PM Maureen Roult via Groups.Io <singndance=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
We've been in the pilot program for a year or so and have yet to have a problem with the 3-gallon bags disintegrating on us.  Maybe it depends on what you put in them.

Maureen Roult
she/her/hers


On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 09:55:28 AM EST, Corrie <corriecar@...> wrote:


The city website is clear that they won’t give out bins for the city wide rollout. They aren’t explicit about how they want materials put out for pickup, though. They make it seem like they want compost mixed with yard waste.


-Cȯrrie


On Nov 30, 2019, 07:58 -0500, Rachel <rknoyce@...>, wrote:
The city provided countertop bins for those in the pilot program; I'm not sure if they will do that for everyone as it rolls out citywide.

Whether you prefer a counter bin or a floor bin with a foot pedal or a cupboard bin under your sink is really a matter of personal preference. In theory I prefer the floor bins, but in our current kitchen layout, floor space is at a greater premium so we use the countertop bin provided by the city pilot program.

I do recommend using sturdier compostable bags though, unless you want to take your compost outside daily. The flimsier ones doubtless disintegrate faster in the county facility... But they also disintegrate inside your bin, and I don't enjoy cleaning out the slime every other day when the bag falls apart. I've been using these for a few months with no complaints: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07PQHCVXD/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_BCM4DbEX9XC1J

- Rachel

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019, 5:59 PM Mary Kennedy <kennedy.mary@...> wrote:
We like the “classic” metal cylinder with lid — you put (replaceable and washable) charcoal filters in the top which prevent it from smelling (though if you have fish skins or raw meat in there I’d empty it quickly) — we use the compostable bags  for ease of transferring into the outdoor collection bucket, and then wash out the inside pail before filling it up again. As Flawn said, the outdoor bucket can get pretty nasty especially in the summer, but wash it out & put in the sun and you’ll be fine. 

We backyard compost as well but this program is great for meat scraps/bones/eggs/breads etc — and winter! No more smelly trash :)

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 17:25 mbcsquirrel98 via Groups.Io <mbcsquirrel98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm excited to hear about the new citywide compost collection!

Would those of you in the pilot program be willing to share your thoughts on the best kitchen or curbside bins (or other supplies) for composting?

Thanks,
Rebecca Morrison

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 04:49:13 PM EST, marialis zmuda <mzmuda48@...> wrote:


Jessica,

are the bucket and bags still available?  if so, i will take them.

marialis zmuda

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 4:41 PM Jessica Arends <jessica.arends@...> wrote:
Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

Nina Faye
 

We participated in the pilot program for awhile. We had three curb side buckets stolen.  We went back to our own backyard system, less hastle. Of course we do not have much compost waste. Nina


On Sat, Nov 30, 2019 at 5:54 PM, Cheryl Hoffman
<bricomane@...> wrote:
Pilot program participants received a letter announcing that we can keep our white compost bins and the small scrap- collecting containers. Of course, I've already tossed the letter in the recycling bin, so someone please correct me if I give incorrect info here.

As I recall, residents joining the composting effort from now on will need to provide their own equipment. The city suggests a latching compost bin for street-side collection; raccoons, dogs, etc. are very clever at getting into less secure containers.  I'm pretty sure compost and yard waste should be kept separate. 

As Maureen said, the biobags are sturdy. I've only had one bag failure, and I had really overstuffed it, then let it sit fora few days, which allowed the bag to weaken. That was a lesson learned!

There are lots of online and local sources for the equipment that's needed, from low price points to high. 

Happy composting!

Cheryl

“Time and trouble will tame an advanced young woman, but an advanced old woman is uncontrollable by any earthly force.”

            Sir Impey Biggs

            (Dorothy Sayers, Clouds of Witness)

 



On Sat, Nov 30, 2019 at 4:30 PM Maureen Roult via Groups.Io <singndance=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
We've been in the pilot program for a year or so and have yet to have a problem with the 3-gallon bags disintegrating on us.  Maybe it depends on what you put in them.

Maureen Roult
she/her/hers


On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 09:55:28 AM EST, Corrie <corriecar@...> wrote:


The city website is clear that they won’t give out bins for the city wide rollout. They aren’t explicit about how they want materials put out for pickup, though. They make it seem like they want compost mixed with yard waste.


-Cȯrrie


On Nov 30, 2019, 07:58 -0500, Rachel <rknoyce@...>, wrote:
The city provided countertop bins for those in the pilot program; I'm not sure if they will do that for everyone as it rolls out citywide.

Whether you prefer a counter bin or a floor bin with a foot pedal or a cupboard bin under your sink is really a matter of personal preference. In theory I prefer the floor bins, but in our current kitchen layout, floor space is at a greater premium so we use the countertop bin provided by the city pilot program.

I do recommend using sturdier compostable bags though, unless you want to take your compost outside daily. The flimsier ones doubtless disintegrate faster in the county facility... But they also disintegrate inside your bin, and I don't enjoy cleaning out the slime every other day when the bag falls apart. I've been using these for a few months with no complaints: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07PQHCVXD/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_BCM4DbEX9XC1J

- Rachel

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019, 5:59 PM Mary Kennedy <kennedy.mary@...> wrote:
We like the “classic” metal cylinder with lid — you put (replaceable and washable) charcoal filters in the top which prevent it from smelling (though if you have fish skins or raw meat in there I’d empty it quickly) — we use the compostable bags  for ease of transferring into the outdoor collection bucket, and then wash out the inside pail before filling it up again. As Flawn said, the outdoor bucket can get pretty nasty especially in the summer, but wash it out & put in the sun and you’ll be fine. 

We backyard compost as well but this program is great for meat scraps/bones/eggs/breads etc — and winter! No more smelly trash :)

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 17:25 mbcsquirrel98 via Groups.Io <mbcsquirrel98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm excited to hear about the new citywide compost collection!

Would those of you in the pilot program be willing to share your thoughts on the best kitchen or curbside bins (or other supplies) for composting?

Thanks,
Rebecca Morrison

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 04:49:13 PM EST, marialis zmuda <mzmuda48@...> wrote:


Jessica,

are the bucket and bags still available?  if so, i will take them.

marialis zmuda

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 4:41 PM Jessica Arends <jessica.arends@...> wrote:
Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

E J Mulliken
 

We have backyard composted for years.  Learned that we could not add rice because we attracted rats.  At least that is the only change we could think of that we had made.  So we will do both back yard (results are good for our yard) and through the city for meat, bones, fish skins, and rice.  

The University of Maryland has a great recycling and composting program.  Composting has come slow because of 1) resistance and 2) cost of adding personnel to pick it up, process it, etc.   Our office recently began composting and we've made a big change from plastic Keurig coffee pods to compostable plastic pods.  UMD Dining Services also uses compostable serving utensils.  These are not compostable at home but only in an industrial setting. 

Question:  Will Hyattsville accept compostable plastics (most are marked as such) and coffee pods?

Jane Mulliken






On Sat, Nov 30, 2019 at 6:10 PM Nina Faye via Groups.Io <ns_faye=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
We participated in the pilot program for awhile. We had three curb side buckets stolen.  We went back to our own backyard system, less hastle. Of course we do not have much compost waste. Nina


On Sat, Nov 30, 2019 at 5:54 PM, Cheryl Hoffman
<bricomane@...> wrote:
Pilot program participants received a letter announcing that we can keep our white compost bins and the small scrap- collecting containers. Of course, I've already tossed the letter in the recycling bin, so someone please correct me if I give incorrect info here.

As I recall, residents joining the composting effort from now on will need to provide their own equipment. The city suggests a latching compost bin for street-side collection; raccoons, dogs, etc. are very clever at getting into less secure containers.  I'm pretty sure compost and yard waste should be kept separate. 

As Maureen said, the biobags are sturdy. I've only had one bag failure, and I had really overstuffed it, then let it sit fora few days, which allowed the bag to weaken. That was a lesson learned!

There are lots of online and local sources for the equipment that's needed, from low price points to high. 

Happy composting!

Cheryl

“Time and trouble will tame an advanced young woman, but an advanced old woman is uncontrollable by any earthly force.”

            Sir Impey Biggs

            (Dorothy Sayers, Clouds of Witness)

 



On Sat, Nov 30, 2019 at 4:30 PM Maureen Roult via Groups.Io <singndance=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
We've been in the pilot program for a year or so and have yet to have a problem with the 3-gallon bags disintegrating on us.  Maybe it depends on what you put in them.

Maureen Roult
she/her/hers


On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 09:55:28 AM EST, Corrie <corriecar@...> wrote:


The city website is clear that they won’t give out bins for the city wide rollout. They aren’t explicit about how they want materials put out for pickup, though. They make it seem like they want compost mixed with yard waste.


-Cȯrrie


On Nov 30, 2019, 07:58 -0500, Rachel <rknoyce@...>, wrote:
The city provided countertop bins for those in the pilot program; I'm not sure if they will do that for everyone as it rolls out citywide.

Whether you prefer a counter bin or a floor bin with a foot pedal or a cupboard bin under your sink is really a matter of personal preference. In theory I prefer the floor bins, but in our current kitchen layout, floor space is at a greater premium so we use the countertop bin provided by the city pilot program.

I do recommend using sturdier compostable bags though, unless you want to take your compost outside daily. The flimsier ones doubtless disintegrate faster in the county facility... But they also disintegrate inside your bin, and I don't enjoy cleaning out the slime every other day when the bag falls apart. I've been using these for a few months with no complaints: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07PQHCVXD/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_BCM4DbEX9XC1J

- Rachel

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019, 5:59 PM Mary Kennedy <kennedy.mary@...> wrote:
We like the “classic” metal cylinder with lid — you put (replaceable and washable) charcoal filters in the top which prevent it from smelling (though if you have fish skins or raw meat in there I’d empty it quickly) — we use the compostable bags  for ease of transferring into the outdoor collection bucket, and then wash out the inside pail before filling it up again. As Flawn said, the outdoor bucket can get pretty nasty especially in the summer, but wash it out & put in the sun and you’ll be fine. 

We backyard compost as well but this program is great for meat scraps/bones/eggs/breads etc — and winter! No more smelly trash :)

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 17:25 mbcsquirrel98 via Groups.Io <mbcsquirrel98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm excited to hear about the new citywide compost collection!

Would those of you in the pilot program be willing to share your thoughts on the best kitchen or curbside bins (or other supplies) for composting?

Thanks,
Rebecca Morrison

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 04:49:13 PM EST, marialis zmuda <mzmuda48@...> wrote:


Jessica,

are the bucket and bags still available?  if so, i will take them.

marialis zmuda

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 4:41 PM Jessica Arends <jessica.arends@...> wrote:
Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia

Danny Schaible
 

Glad to see city-wide compost collection in time for the 2020 New Year. If anyone is in need of a resolution, try composting!

To answer an earlier question about compostable utensils and coffee pods, I think these would be OK to add. Hyattsville compost is sent to the composting facility run by Prince George's County in Upper Marlboro, a state of the art facility (and the largest composting operation in the Eastern US) and they should be able to handle this type of material.

For a kitchen compost receptacle, I prefer something that I can keep in my freezer to eliminate odors and potential to attract fruit flies. A large zip-lock bag works well for this, or if you want something a little more fancy I have used this product and it works well.

Currently, only about ~5% of Hyattsville homes participate in the pilot curbside compost program. Now that the program is accessible to all Hyattsville residents (at least for non-commercial and multi-family residents) it would be great to increase this figure dramatically and reduce what we collectively send to the landfill.

Danny


On Sat, Nov 30, 2019 at 10:30 PM E Mulliken <emulliken@...> wrote:
We have backyard composted for years.  Learned that we could not add rice because we attracted rats.  At least that is the only change we could think of that we had made.  So we will do both back yard (results are good for our yard) and through the city for meat, bones, fish skins, and rice.  

The University of Maryland has a great recycling and composting program.  Composting has come slow because of 1) resistance and 2) cost of adding personnel to pick it up, process it, etc.   Our office recently began composting and we've made a big change from plastic Keurig coffee pods to compostable plastic pods.  UMD Dining Services also uses compostable serving utensils.  These are not compostable at home but only in an industrial setting. 

Question:  Will Hyattsville accept compostable plastics (most are marked as such) and coffee pods?

Jane Mulliken






On Sat, Nov 30, 2019 at 6:10 PM Nina Faye via Groups.Io <ns_faye=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
We participated in the pilot program for awhile. We had three curb side buckets stolen.  We went back to our own backyard system, less hastle. Of course we do not have much compost waste. Nina


On Sat, Nov 30, 2019 at 5:54 PM, Cheryl Hoffman
<bricomane@...> wrote:
Pilot program participants received a letter announcing that we can keep our white compost bins and the small scrap- collecting containers. Of course, I've already tossed the letter in the recycling bin, so someone please correct me if I give incorrect info here.

As I recall, residents joining the composting effort from now on will need to provide their own equipment. The city suggests a latching compost bin for street-side collection; raccoons, dogs, etc. are very clever at getting into less secure containers.  I'm pretty sure compost and yard waste should be kept separate. 

As Maureen said, the biobags are sturdy. I've only had one bag failure, and I had really overstuffed it, then let it sit fora few days, which allowed the bag to weaken. That was a lesson learned!

There are lots of online and local sources for the equipment that's needed, from low price points to high. 

Happy composting!

Cheryl

“Time and trouble will tame an advanced young woman, but an advanced old woman is uncontrollable by any earthly force.”

            Sir Impey Biggs

            (Dorothy Sayers, Clouds of Witness)

 



On Sat, Nov 30, 2019 at 4:30 PM Maureen Roult via Groups.Io <singndance=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
We've been in the pilot program for a year or so and have yet to have a problem with the 3-gallon bags disintegrating on us.  Maybe it depends on what you put in them.

Maureen Roult
she/her/hers


On Saturday, November 30, 2019, 09:55:28 AM EST, Corrie <corriecar@...> wrote:


The city website is clear that they won’t give out bins for the city wide rollout. They aren’t explicit about how they want materials put out for pickup, though. They make it seem like they want compost mixed with yard waste.


-Cȯrrie


On Nov 30, 2019, 07:58 -0500, Rachel <rknoyce@...>, wrote:
The city provided countertop bins for those in the pilot program; I'm not sure if they will do that for everyone as it rolls out citywide.

Whether you prefer a counter bin or a floor bin with a foot pedal or a cupboard bin under your sink is really a matter of personal preference. In theory I prefer the floor bins, but in our current kitchen layout, floor space is at a greater premium so we use the countertop bin provided by the city pilot program.

I do recommend using sturdier compostable bags though, unless you want to take your compost outside daily. The flimsier ones doubtless disintegrate faster in the county facility... But they also disintegrate inside your bin, and I don't enjoy cleaning out the slime every other day when the bag falls apart. I've been using these for a few months with no complaints: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07PQHCVXD/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_BCM4DbEX9XC1J

- Rachel

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019, 5:59 PM Mary Kennedy <kennedy.mary@...> wrote:
We like the “classic” metal cylinder with lid — you put (replaceable and washable) charcoal filters in the top which prevent it from smelling (though if you have fish skins or raw meat in there I’d empty it quickly) — we use the compostable bags  for ease of transferring into the outdoor collection bucket, and then wash out the inside pail before filling it up again. As Flawn said, the outdoor bucket can get pretty nasty especially in the summer, but wash it out & put in the sun and you’ll be fine. 

We backyard compost as well but this program is great for meat scraps/bones/eggs/breads etc — and winter! No more smelly trash :)

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 17:25 mbcsquirrel98 via Groups.Io <mbcsquirrel98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm excited to hear about the new citywide compost collection!

Would those of you in the pilot program be willing to share your thoughts on the best kitchen or curbside bins (or other supplies) for composting?

Thanks,
Rebecca Morrison

On Friday, November 29, 2019, 04:49:13 PM EST, marialis zmuda <mzmuda48@...> wrote:


Jessica,

are the bucket and bags still available?  if so, i will take them.

marialis zmuda

On Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 4:41 PM Jessica Arends <jessica.arends@...> wrote:
Hi Julia, 
We have a city-provided compost bucket and bags that we have never used because we do backyard composting. Let me know if you would like it and we will leave it out for you to pick up. 
Jessica (on Oglethorpe St by the middle school)

On Thu., 28 Nov. 2019, 5:50 am Julia Barsi via Groups.Io, <lindy_circle=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all -
I was glad to read in the hyattsville newsletter about the compost program finally being rolled out city-wide, but I'm a little confused about what I need to have.  The city web site says "collect food scrap items in kitchen pails using 3-gallon biodegradable bags, and to use compost bins with a lid that latches animals from accessing the composted materials".

So what do I put the bags of compost in when I take it to the curb?  Do I need a special pail?  I don't think I've seen the bins that the city provided for the pilot program so I'm not sure what "compost bins with a lid" looks like.  I certainly can't put the 1-gallon compost bucket that I have been using in my kitchen on the curb; it's too small and it isn't durable enough.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some clarification and happy thanksgiving!
Julia