VARNEY/BOWSER 2-8-0


Casey Sterbenz
 

I have an old Varney 2-8-0 that I'd like to rebuild into something typical
of a 1890-1920 era locomotive used in the northeast. I researched my MRR
back issues and came up with an article about using the mechanism with a
wood-dowel boiler (remember those wonderful "Kitchen Table Locomotive"
articles from the '50s?) to resemble a Ma & Pa locomotive. That's the sort
of conversion I have in mind, although I'll likely roll a boiler from sheet
or find a suitable length of copper pipe rather than use wood. I've been
looking around for a suitable prototype but can find nothing with 63"
drivers other than the very heavy Reading and PRR prototypes. I generally
follow LIRR practice so I'm leaning toward a camelback type, but something
with a conventional boiler/cab arrangement would suit me just as well. Most
of the drawings I find are of engines with drivers in the 51" to 56"
diameter range. Does anyone out there know of a prototype 2-8-0 with
drivers in the 60-65" range other than Reading or PRR?

Casey Sterbenz
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Richard Parker <t3consult@...>
 

I believe that some of the IC consolidations had 63" drivers - Look in MR
Locomotive Cyclopedia for steam. Also, there were some early, and late Mikados
with 63" drivers.

Casey Sterbenz wrote:

From: "Casey Sterbenz" <sterbejj@hotmail.com>

I have an old Varney 2-8-0 that I'd like to rebuild into something typical
of a 1890-1920 era locomotive used in the northeast. I researched my MRR
back issues and came up with an article about using the mechanism with a
wood-dowel boiler (remember those wonderful "Kitchen Table Locomotive"
articles from the '50s?) to resemble a Ma & Pa locomotive. That's the sort
of conversion I have in mind, although I'll likely roll a boiler from sheet
or find a suitable length of copper pipe rather than use wood. I've been
looking around for a suitable prototype but can find nothing with 63"
drivers other than the very heavy Reading and PRR prototypes. I generally
follow LIRR practice so I'm leaning toward a camelback type, but something
with a conventional boiler/cab arrangement would suit me just as well. Most
of the drawings I find are of engines with drivers in the 51" to 56"
diameter range. Does anyone out there know of a prototype 2-8-0 with
drivers in the 60-65" range other than Reading or PRR?

Casey Sterbenz
______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

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eric wolfsbane <wolfsbane@...>
 

You could try a NYC/Rutland G-34[] class consolidation.

DWB seventeen feet
TWB twenty five feet and nine inches
B/S 22.5 by 30 inches
piston valve Stephenson valve gear
DD sixty three inches
LTD thirty inches

The varney/bowser old lady consolidation is close with the following
dimensions:

DWB 17'-9"
TWB 27'-11"
DD 62"
LTD 33 OR 30"

Theres an excellent article regarding constructing styrene locomotives
titled 'The locomotive You Wanted But Couldn't Get' It's in the October 1974
Model Railroader, page 40. It was written by
Monte Hoffmann. If you don't have access to the magazine email me privately.

It describes building a boiler up from a plastic tube to the proper profile
with .010 sheet styrene. it also talks about turning domes and such with an
electric drill, making cabs and tenders out out styrene.

You might find the following website useful. It's a shroud calculator for
model rocketry. It can also be used to create sections of tapered boilers on
steam locomotives as per the techniques in the Hoffmann article.

http://www.petcosouth.com/rblaske/shroudcalc.htm

Eric Soencksen
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