Date   

Re: [HOsteam] Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

Victor Bitleris
 

I understand. The Taig Micro Lathe does not have that feature. Some very good machinists have added that, but it is a LOT of work. Much cheaper purchasing gears from NWSL.
Thanks for the clarification.

Vic Bitleris
Raleigh, NC

To: HOsteam@yahoogroups.com
From: krickman1@carolina.rr.com
Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2011 13:57:54 -0400
Subject: Re: [HOsteam] Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information




























On 10/18/2011 1:48 PM, Victor Bitleris wrote:

[F]or the life of me, I cannot imagine how you would turn a worm on the lathe.
Any lathe which can cut a screw can cut a worm. The lead screw is

driven via gears from the spindle, so that it will advance the carriage

a set distance for every revolution of the spindle. Changing the gear

ratio changes the thread pitch.



Ken Rickman



--

Kenneth Rickman

Salisbury, NC


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

Ken Robbins
 

Vic, Ken Rickman is abosultely correct. My 9" South Bend lathe can cut virtually any pitch screw (or worm) by changing the lead screw gearing to give the necessary longitudinal travel for each revolution of the spindle.

When I Grind a toolbit to match an existing worm I simply grind the sides and tip until the toolbit fits into a correct-size worm with little or no mismatch of the side angles. I usually make it a little narrower than finished size and then use my compound rest set parallel to the spindle to make small left and right passes until the correct profile is acheived.

Yes, it's a slow, tedious process but it works. I only do it when I have to!

Ken Robbins


Re: [HOsteam] Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

Kenneth Rickman
 

On 10/18/2011 1:48 PM, Victor Bitleris wrote:
[F]or the life of me, I cannot imagine how you would turn a worm on the lathe.
Any lathe which can cut a screw can cut a worm. The lead screw is driven via gears from the spindle, so that it will advance the carriage a set distance for every revolution of the spindle. Changing the gear ratio changes the thread pitch.

Ken Rickman

--
Kenneth Rickman
Salisbury, NC


Re: [HOsteam] Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

Victor Bitleris
 

Hi Ken,
I do not understand what you mean by "grinding a toolbit to match the original Mantua worm". Does your lathe have a controllable carriage motor? I am guessing that is the only way it would work. I am not machinist, but rather a hobbyist and I do have a Taig micro lathe that I use for brass turning and milling, but for the life of me, I cannot imagine how you would turn a worm on the lathe.
Thanks and regards,
Vic Bitleris
Raleigh, NC

To: HOsteam@yahoogroups.com
From: kenrobbins39@yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2011 12:08:15 +0000
Subject: [HOsteam] Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information






























Bill, I spent many years as a machinist before retiring, so grinding a toolbit to match the original Mantua worm was not too difficult for me. My home made worms (I've made several over the years) are never quite as smooth as NWSL's, but if I can't find one of their's to fit the situation, the "home mades" are smooth enough!



Incidentally, when I have a metal to metal worm gear set (typically a steel worm and a brass gear), I usually improve the mating fit by polishing the assembled set (in the locomotive) with abrasive lapping compound, followed by a thorough cleaning then run it again with jeweler's rouge polishing compound (often for several hours, over a period of days), then more disassembly, cleaning and finally lubrication. The difference in smoothness and noise level is usually dramatic!



That being said, I've found that this procedure doesn't seem to work with the Micarta / Fiber worm gears commonly found in older engines. Not sure why this is. They remain noisy after all the polishing and cleaning work! Maybe someone on this list can explain why.



I've never bothered using this polishing technique on Delrin or Nylon worm gears because I've always found them to be smooth and quiet right from the start.



Ken Robbins


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

Ken Robbins
 

Bill, I spent many years as a machinist before retiring, so grinding a toolbit to match the original Mantua worm was not too difficult for me. My home made worms (I've made several over the years) are never quite as smooth as NWSL's, but if I can't find one of their's to fit the situation, the "home mades" are smooth enough!

Incidentally, when I have a metal to metal worm gear set (typically a steel worm and a brass gear), I usually improve the mating fit by polishing the assembled set (in the locomotive) with abrasive lapping compound, followed by a thorough cleaning then run it again with jeweler's rouge polishing compound (often for several hours, over a period of days), then more disassembly, cleaning and finally lubrication. The difference in smoothness and noise level is usually dramatic!

That being said, I've found that this procedure doesn't seem to work with the Micarta / Fiber worm gears commonly found in older engines. Not sure why this is. They remain noisy after all the polishing and cleaning work! Maybe someone on this list can explain why.

I've never bothered using this polishing technique on Delrin or Nylon worm gears because I've always found them to be smooth and quiet right from the start.

Ken Robbins


[HOsteam] Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

Bill Brown
 

[ ... ]
I have a lathe, so I replaced the Mantua Nylon worm with one made of brass but kept the original Nylon worm gear. I use LaBelle #102 on my gears. The loco is extremely quiet and has racked up more than 100 hours so far with no problems whatsoever, other than occasional cleaning of those (ugh!) brass tires.
[ ... ]

Did you turn the worm yourself or were you able to find a metal worm that
fit the stock worm gear? It seems like grinding a cutter for the worm would
be a challenge.

Nice collection of resuscitated models! The Little Six is a nice job. I
could use one like that for a switching layout I'm planning. Perhaps I'll
come across one at RailFair in Roseville next month.
--


--+---+ \/ -bill
++---+ |[]]|_^_[] gearedloco2001@yahoo.com
_|____+-+___|____|_ Modesto, CA
| o+o +-+ ()--()-= \ Amazing Grace - C-250 #302


Re: [HOsteam] What to do with brass driver tires?

Kenneth Rickman
 

On 10/17/2011 9:24 PM, Victor Bitleris wrote:
Check this one out. His prices seem much more reasonable.
http://sierrascalemodels.com/plating.htm
Thanks, Vic. That is MUCH more reasonable. $20 for a 2-8-0 I can stand. I wonder why there is such a variation?

Ken

--
Kenneth Rickman
Salisbury, NC


Re: [HOsteam] What to do with brass driver tires?

Victor Bitleris
 

Check this one out. His prices seem much more reasonable.
http://sierrascalemodels.com/plating.htm
Regards,
Vic Bitleris
Raleigh, NC

To: HOsteam@yahoogroups.com
From: krickman1@carolina.rr.com
Date: Mon, 17 Oct 2011 20:38:26 -0400
Subject: Re: [HOsteam] What to do with brass driver tires?




























On 10/17/2011 7:30 PM, Kenneth Martin wrote:

The "Shayfixer" does plating of wheels. See his page at:
http://www.shayfixer.com/TheNickelPlater.htm
The results are beautiful, but the price is hard to justify.

"$40 labor minimum plus$12 per axle plus$10.00 USPS Priority Mail back

to you..."

Formy little MDC 2-8-0, that works out to $98, plus the cost of shipping

the drivers to him. That's a little hard to swallow for an engine that

only cost me $30 including shipping! I guess if I were doing a

restoration of a valuable model or something, it might be a better deal.



--

Kenneth Rickman

Salisbury, NC






















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [HOsteam] What to do with brass driver tires?

Kenneth Rickman
 

On 10/17/2011 7:30 PM, Kenneth Martin wrote:
The "Shayfixer" does plating of wheels. See his page at:
http://www.shayfixer.com/TheNickelPlater.htm
The results are beautiful, but the price is hard to justify.
"$40 labor minimum plus$12 per axle plus$10.00 USPS Priority Mail back
to you..."
Formy little MDC 2-8-0, that works out to $98, plus the cost of shipping
the drivers to him. That's a little hard to swallow for an engine that
only cost me $30 including shipping! I guess if I were doing a
restoration of a valuable model or something, it might be a better deal.

--
Kenneth Rickman
Salisbury, NC


Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

allen wood
 

Ken,

Thanks for the pictures and info. Again, a very nice job.


Allen Wood
Chico, Ca.


Re: [HOsteam] What to do with brass driver tires?

Ken Martin
 

The "Shayfixer" does plating of wheels. See his page at:
http://www.shayfixer.com/TheNickelPlater.htm

Ken Martin
Sacramento

On Oct 17, 2011, at 2:42 PM, Kenneth Rickman wrote:

Nickel plating
is ideal, but I don't know how hard it would be to do or have done.

Ken Rickman

--
Kenneth Rickman
Salisbury, NC


What to do with brass driver tires?

Kenneth Rickman
 

The recent discussion about the Mantua 0-6-0 brought up an interesting question for me. What do you do to improve the brass tires found on so many old models? I've thought about coating them in solder, but that seems like a really bad idea for a variety of reasons. Nickel plating is ideal, but I don't know how hard it would be to do or have done. Are there any other options?

Ken Rickman

--
Kenneth Rickman
Salisbury, NC


Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

Ken Robbins
 

Allen, I have posted 3 more photos of my Mantua 0-6-0-T that show the underside. I feel putting pickup wipers on the backside of an engine's drivers is better than having them rub on the tread (too much dirt buildup), so I worked out this arrangement. The thin phosphor-bronze fingers exert very light pressure.

I have a lathe, so I replaced the Mantua Nylon worm with one made of brass but kept the original Nylon worm gear. I use LaBelle #102 on my gears. The loco is extremely quiet and has racked up more than 100 hours so far with no problems whatsoever, other than occasional cleaning of those (ugh!) brass tires.

Good luck with your conversion. Hope to see pictures someday!

Ken Robbins


Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

allen wood
 

Ken,

Outstanding job on the Mantua 0-6-0T. I'm about 75% done on a similiar conversion. You mention "all wheel" pick up in one of the pictures, could you elaborate on what you did? Also, did you regear with NWSL products?

Allen Wood
Chico, Ca.


Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

Ken Robbins
 

Tom, as Ken Clark has correctly pointed out, the addition of a modern can motor will often transform these 50-year-old models into sweet-running little powerhouses.

I own one of those Mantua 0-6-0 tank engines and have made quite a few modifications to it (see photos in "Ken Robbins Steam Engines" in the photo section). It is now one of the quietest, smoothest running engines I own.

Ken Robbins
Hancock, NH


Re: [HOsteam] New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

Ken Clark
 

When it comes to older models, you have to decide if "Parts are Parts". In many cases someone has made an improvement on the original parts that improves the model's appearance or operation. NWSL for instance has made many replacement gear sets for such models and in most cases has a recommended motor upgrade. Mellor at one time made improved worm and motor sets for some older Mantua models. Helix Humper has a flat can motor with a large flywheel/worm designed for this model as well (Mantua 0-6-0 tank switcher part #160 $31.95). Adding a more efficient motor with a flywheel makes many of these older models operate better than new.




Kenneth R. Clark
P.O. Box 127054
San Diego, CA 92112

-----Original Message-----
From: papasmurf <papa.smurf5@myfairpoint.net>
To: HOsteam <HOsteam@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tue, Oct 11, 2011 5:56 pm
Subject: [HOsteam] New member...Saying Hello and with request for information





Have 50+ yr.-old Mantua HO 0-6-0T tank engine, badly in need of TLC. Was hoping someone here may know some sources for genuine parts, so loco can be restored to operating condition [OTHER THAN E-BAY, PLEASE!]. Even an old one for parts, which might help me to restore mine. TTFN & Keep Your Rails Shiny. .....Old Tom aka papasmurf in NH









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

John Hagen
 

Tom,

Go to http://yardbirdtrains.com/

The website shows but a protion of what he has in stock. If what you need isn't shown there, email or phone Dan and he will likely have it. He is an Mautua parts dealer for a long time and has just about anything you could ask for on a post-war Mantua product.

He does sell on ebay but that is just one of his marketing methods. There is also a related yardbirdtrains Yahoo group

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/yardbirdtrains/

and an unrelated vintage HO group

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vintageHO/

both of which are great for anyone interested in vintage HO stuff.

John Hagen

--- In HOsteam@yahoogroups.com, "papasmurf" <papa.smurf5@...> wrote:

Have 50+ yr.-old Mantua HO 0-6-0T tank engine, badly in need of TLC. Was hoping someone here may know some sources for genuine parts, so loco can be restored to operating condition [OTHER THAN E-BAY, PLEASE!]. Even an old one for parts, which might help me to restore mine. TTFN & Keep Your Rails Shiny. .....Old Tom aka papasmurf in NH


Re: [HOsteam] New member...Saying Hello and with request for information

James
 

try hoyardsale user group or repower regear 
 james dunlap 


________________________________
From: papasmurf <papa.smurf5@myfairpoint.net>
To: HOsteam@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2011 6:56 PM
Subject: [HOsteam] New member...Saying Hello and with request for information


 
Have 50+ yr.-old Mantua HO 0-6-0T tank engine, badly in need of TLC. Was hoping someone here may know some sources for genuine parts, so loco can be restored to operating condition [OTHER THAN E-BAY, PLEASE!]. Even an old one for parts, which might help me to restore mine. TTFN & Keep Your Rails Shiny. .....Old Tom aka papasmurf in NH




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [HOsteam] Steam Oil Bunker

Ian Campbell <injcustomtrains@...>
 

Thanks Roger will do a search for them

Ian Campbell
InJ Custom Trains (painting and detailing n and ho scale)
Oshawa,Ontario
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/profile.php?id=100000742383529

--- On Tue, 9/6/11, Roger Traviss <rogertra@highspeedplus.com> wrote:

From: Roger Traviss <rogertra@highspeedplus.com>
Subject: Re: [HOsteam] Steam Oil Bunker
To: HOsteam@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, September 6, 2011, 9:59 PM
















 









Thanks for your input guys. That's basically what I was about to do anyway.

Now about the hatch and the vent. I am not sure what they look like as I

have never seen the top of one. Are there any pictures to be found of these

Bunkers?



----------------------------------------



Many of the loco detail manufacturers make "tender oil hatches" so anyone of

them would do. Just Google their websites. You're looking for a round

hatch about 12" in diameter.



The vent(s) are just anti-vacuum vents so a piece of 2" diameter pipe in an

upside down hook shape will do.



Cheers

Roger Traviss



Photos of the late GER: -



http://www.greateasternrailway.com



For more photos not in the above album and kitbashes etc..:-

http://s94.photobucket.com/albums/l99/rogertra/Great_Eastern/



























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [HOsteam] Steam Oil Bunker

Roger T
 

Thanks for your input guys. That's basically what I was about to do anyway. Now about the hatch and the vent. I am not sure what they look like as I have never seen the top of one. Are there any pictures to be found of these Bunkers?

----------------------------------------

Many of the loco detail manufacturers make "tender oil hatches" so anyone of them would do. Just Google their websites. You're looking for a round hatch about 12" in diameter.

The vent(s) are just anti-vacuum vents so a piece of 2" diameter pipe in an upside down hook shape will do.

Cheers
Roger Traviss


Photos of the late GER: -

http://www.greateasternrailway.com

For more photos not in the above album and kitbashes etc..:-
http://s94.photobucket.com/albums/l99/rogertra/Great_Eastern/

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